Can I See Your I.D.?: True Stories of False Identities: True Stories of False Identities

Can I See Your I.D.?: True Stories of False Identities: True Stories of False Identities

3.4 5
by Chris Barton, Paul Hoppe
     
 

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True crime, desperation, fraud, and adventure: From the impoverished young woman who enchanted nineteenth-century British society as a faux Asian princess, to the sixteen-year-old boy who "stole" a subway train in 1993, to the lonely but clever Frank Abagnale of Catch Me if You Can fame, these ten vignettes offer riveting insight into mind-blowing

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Overview

True crime, desperation, fraud, and adventure: From the impoverished young woman who enchanted nineteenth-century British society as a faux Asian princess, to the sixteen-year-old boy who "stole" a subway train in 1993, to the lonely but clever Frank Abagnale of Catch Me if You Can fame, these ten vignettes offer riveting insight into mind-blowing masquerades. Graphic panels draw you into the exploits of these pretenders, and meticulously researched details keep you on the edge of your seat. Each scene is presented in the second person, a unique point of view that literally places you inside the faker's mind. With motivations that include survival, delusion, and plain, old-fashioned greed, the psychology of deception has never been so fascinating or so close at hand.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In 10 impeccably crafted profiles, Barton (The Day-Glo Brothers) shares the stories of individuals—many just teenagers—who adopted false identities for amusement, profit, or survival. From Sarah Rosetta Wakeman, who disguised herself as a man to fight in the Civil War, to 16-year-old Keron Thomas, who in 1993 impersonated a transit worker to fulfill his dream of piloting a New York City subway train, Barton reveals the motivations behind and the consequences of each deception. The use of second-person narration is very effective, allowing readers to assume the identities of each individual. Barton's prose captures the daring, ingenuity, and quick thinking required of each imposter ("You can bluster and grumble with the best of them.... You use up your share of tobacco too," he writes of Wakeman). In the most powerful stories, assuming a false identity was a life or death decision, as with Soloman Perel, a Jewish teenager who joined the Hitler Youth to escape being killed, and Ellen Craft, a slave who disguised herself as a white Southern gentleman to escape to the North. Hoppe contributes dynamic comic book–style panel art, not all seen by PW. Ages 12–up. (Apr.)
School Library Journal
Gr 6–9—Barton invites readers to travel with some of the world's greatest hoaxers, con artists, counterfeiters, and other great imposters, taking them into their deceptive minds. Ten short chapters feature clever pretenders, such as the legendary Catch Me If You Can's Frank Abagnale, Jr., and his forays into identity theft. The chapters offer in-the-hot-seat details about these clever-minded imposters, including detailed dates and a "What Happened Next?" page. Told in a second person, the text places readers inside the fakers' minds. However, the constant use of the words "you" and "your" gets rather annoying. Readers, especially younger audiences, might have trouble distinguishing if the stories are indeed real or not. Each chapter opens with a graphic-novel-style illustration. The fascinating stories will provide hours of amusement for those who are interested in the subject. The bibliography features many newspaper and magazine articles on each imposter for readers who are interested in pursuing the topic.—Krista Welz, North Bergen Public Library, NJ
Kirkus Reviews

In 10 vignettes, Barton profiles successful imposters, both men and women. Some assumed false identities for criminal purposes, others for self-preservation. Possibly the most famous of the 10 is Frank Abagnale, a master con-artist whose exploits were immortalized in the Steven Spielberg film Catch Me if You Can. Asa Earl Carter, a longtime Ku Klux Klan member, adopted the new first name of Forrest and passed himself off as a Cherokee to publish a fake memoir, The Education of Little Tree, a bestseller that became a favorite of middle- and high-school teachers. On the other side of the spectrum is Solomon Perel, a Polish Jew whose Aryan features enabled him to pass as an ethnic German, enroll in the Hitler Youth and survive the Holocaust. Ellen Craft's light-skinned features enabled her to pass as white. With her husband, William, posing as her slave, they audaciously boarded a train in Charleston, S.C., and journeyed to freedom in Philadelphia. Barton's use of the second-person point of view gives these stories dramatic tension and a sense of immediacy. Hoppe's graphic panels enhance this effect. The brevity of these profiles will appeal to reluctant readers and work well for reading aloud, but a little more back story for some characters might have clarified the motives for their masquerades. Teens in the thick of creating identities themselves will find this riveting. (bibliography) (Nonfiction. 12 & up)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803733107
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
04/14/2011
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
286,030
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.80(d)
Lexile:
980L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 Years

Meet the Author

Paul Hoppe and Henry Johnson are the real life Travis and Freddy, all grown up.

They have made and lost a million dollars on Wall Street. They have played in the Little League World Series, extreme-skied the Rockies and the Alps, played a ham sandwich on HBO, and visited three of the seven Wonders of the World.

Paul lives in Massachusetts and Henry lives in California.

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Can I See Your I. D. ?: True Stories of False Identities: True Stories of False Identities 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was okay... you would think it would be good if you read what it's about, but the thing that bothered me was that it it written in 2nd person. If you don't know what that means, it is when the author says "you" instead of "he/she" or "I". Another thing: this book isn't all one story. There are many stories on different teenagers who use a fake identity. However, some of them were good, some of them not-so-good. If you think you still might enjoy it, go ahead and buy it. I'm just warning everyone that it is written in 2nd person, and not all of the stories are good. It wasn't a page-turner for me.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I like these kind of books about true crime.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It sucks i hate it so bad
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loved this book, second person or not!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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