Can We Save the Tiger?

Overview

The team behind the award-winning APE returns with an inspiring look at a range of endangered species sure to engage every child who loves animals.

Tigers are pretty special — and so are ground iguanas and partula snails and even white-rumped vultures. But these and many other animals are in danger of disappearing altogether, joining the dodo, the marsupial wolf, the great auk, and countless other animals we will never see again. Using the experiences of a few endangered species...

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Overview

The team behind the award-winning APE returns with an inspiring look at a range of endangered species sure to engage every child who loves animals.

Tigers are pretty special — and so are ground iguanas and partula snails and even white-rumped vultures. But these and many other animals are in danger of disappearing altogether, joining the dodo, the marsupial wolf, the great auk, and countless other animals we will never see again. Using the experiences of a few endangered species as examples, Martin Jenkins highlights the ways human behavior can either threaten or conserve the amazing animals that share our planet. Vicky White’s stunning portraits of rare creatures offer a glimpse of nature’s grace and beauty — and give us a powerful reason to preserve it.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Magnificent artwork and a careful balance of good and bad news are the strengths of this examination of endangered species from the team behind Ape. Tigers are not the only threatened species Jenkins follows; he also discusses partula snails (the victim of a plan to introduce new snail species to the Pacific islands where they live) and white-rumped vultures (whose numbers have been decimated by toxic drugs administered to the cattle whose carcasses they eat). By contrast, he also includes the comeback story of the American bison. Conversational text ("People also noticed that the vultures they did see... often looked all droopy and miserable, as if they were sick. Was there some disease, like vulture-measles or the flu, spreading across India?") explains difficult nuances of politics and sociology with verve. White's animals—meticulously drafted and shaded with the subtlest of earth tones—could almost walk off the page. The book's large trim size allows the inclusion of many sketches of creatures in a variety of positions, while intelligent design and typography decisions make each page worth lingering over. An excellent resource. Ages 5–7. (Feb.)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—This thoughtful introduction to endangered species is a perfectly packaged call to action that takes readers from desperate to hope. More than just the kakapo, bison, sawfish, and others included, this book is about the thousands of animals in danger of extinction and our responsibility to make changes to save them. Jenkins's conversational tone is welcoming and open, and even, in spite of the serious topic, a little humorous. The author is brilliant at explaining complicated human issues simply enough for children while at the same time balancing the needs of these animals. The warm text is successfully paired with White's soft pencil and oil paint illustrations. The artist draws readers in through the eyes of the animals, making it nearly impossible to deny them the attention and respect that their plight deserves. Though the discussions of individual animals are brief, enough information is provided to get youngsters thinking about them and imagining their future. The collection of success stories works as inspiration and provides a clear indication that yes, we can save the tiger, but it requires action, hard work, conscious decisions, and books like this one in the hands of children. Librarians, do your part.—Heather Acerro, Allen County Public Library, Fort Wayne, IN
Kirkus Reviews
From big, beautiful tigers to the lowly partula snail, the stunning illustrations in this album of endangered species accompany a familiar message: Human actions change the world in ways that affect many other species. Jenkins addresses readers directly, beginning by describing some extinct animals, but, unusually, he goes on to offer positive examples of once-threatened animals that have now recovered. He points out the complexity of conservation problems in the face of human needs. Close-up, highly detailed oil-and-pencil illustrations by an exceptionally talented natural-history illustrator bring 28 different animals right into readers' laps. The oversized volume, with its generous white space and varied typefaces, can easily be shared with a group as well. Along with the conversational narrative introduction, each animal is identified with its Latin name and other important facts. At the end, suggestions for further Web research and a concept index is illustrated with a picture of a rare orchid, reminding readers that the problem is not limited to the animal world. This is a treasure for teachers and animal lovers alike. (Informational picture book. 5-9)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780763673789
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 9/9/2014
  • Pages: 56
  • Sales rank: 587,761
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.88 (w) x 10.63 (h) x 0.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Martin Jenkins, a conservation biologist, has written several nonfiction books for children, including Ape, Grandma Elephant’s in Charge, The Emperor’s Egg, and Chameleons Are Cool. He lives in Cambridge, England.

Vicky White worked as a zookeeper for several years before earning an MA in natural history illustration from London’s Royal College of Art. She made her picture book debut with Ape. She lives in Middlesex, England.

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