Can We Share the World with Tigers?

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Overview


Bengal tigers are an endangered species due to many human-caused factors, such as poaching, habitat destruction, and global warming. In Robert Wells's signature style, this book explores these difficult topics in a child-friendly manner with endearing illustrations--and it gives kids ways they can help to save the tigers, too.
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Overview


Bengal tigers are an endangered species due to many human-caused factors, such as poaching, habitat destruction, and global warming. In Robert Wells's signature style, this book explores these difficult topics in a child-friendly manner with endearing illustrations--and it gives kids ways they can help to save the tigers, too.
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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Jennifer Greene
Bengal tigers are in danger of becoming extinct, as this title from the "Wells of Knowledge Science" series illustrates. The book starts by following a tigress and her cubs through the dangers of poaching and habitat destruction. In distracting unrealism, the tigers make friends with a langur monkey, who accompanies them through the rest of the book. The text then discusses habitat destruction in general before veering wildly into concepts such as invasive species, mass extinctions, and biodiversity. While it introduces interesting, important concepts, the book lacks organizational clarity and reads a bit didactic. The cartoon illustrations are at odds with the book's serious tone. In addition, the use of comics-type paneling in the layout makes following the order of the text difficult in places. Timelines on vertically oriented page spreads, while a fun concept, in practice just further contributes to an awkward reading experience. The book includes a list of ideas of things kids can do to live sustainably, but it remains unclear how these suggestions, like controlling invasive weeds or buying a bird warning bell for your cat, will affect tigers. The end contains a helpful glossary of the well-chosen, bolded words introduced in the text, but an addition of an index listing the page number where the word appeared in context might have been useful as well. The narrative frame concerning the tigers pops up briefly at the end, but is altogether poorly done—it is unrealistic, lopsided at the beginning, and has little to do with the rest of the book. Furthermore, the title's question is never sufficiently answered. Altogether, while the book touches on interesting ecological concepts, it falls short as a science resource for the target audience of young readers aged six to nine. Reviewer: Jennifer Greene
School Library Journal
Gr 2–3—This science book packs several ideas into a picture book for young children. What begins with a charming story of a Bengal tigress and her cubs and the dangers in their world quickly turns into a race through facts about the world, ecology, biodiversity, habitat destruction, species population, mass extinction, invasive species, eco-footprints, and alternative energy. It is all a bit overwhelming. The cartoon-style illustrations and fictional approach belie the seriousness of the topic, for instance, the tigress licking a monkey to say thank you for a warning of approaching danger. The text romps through history and jumps from spot to spot on Earth, making the material disconnected and confusing. On one spread children are reading about early hunters and gatherers and on the next they see the tigers looking at a large city with skyscrapers. A couple of pages later the tigers are in a boat on the ocean. The Bengal tigers will appeal to children, but they are likely to miss most of the information the author is trying to impart.—Erlene Bishop Killeen, Stoughton Area School District, WI
Kirkus Reviews
Using threats to endangered Bengal tigers' survival as a springboard, Wells teaches young readers about the many ways humans interfere with the natural world and its biodiversity. Opening with a Bengal tigress and her cubs, Wells introduces into the mix a langur monkey that stops the tigress from walking into a poacher's trap. The anthropomorphized quartet (the tiger plants a big kiss on the monkey's cheek--yeah, right) then travel through the book together, teaching readers about habitat destruction, pollution, overharvesting, invasive species, biodiversity and extinction. Words are defined in the text, in a glossary or in glaring yellow "Learning Circle[s]" that also sometimes provide factoids, but while many of the glossary words are all in caps, there are other words that also appear this way that are not defined in the back. Also, while the more scientific terminology is defined, other vocabulary is not as audience-friendly: excessive, sensitive, vegetation, profit, livestock, disrupted, emit, incurable. Not as strong as its predecessors in the Wells of Knowledge Science series, this is not as well-written or -designed--the text is scattered across the spreads and often justified or otherwise confusingly spaced, making it difficult to follow. Too, there are a few pages that are vertically oriented. The pen-and-acrylic illustrations nicely convey the concepts using a mix of timelines, flowcharts and artwork, but the fact/fiction blend jars. A hot topic receives a tepid treatment. (Informational picture book. 5-9)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807510551
  • Publisher: Whitman, Albert & Company
  • Publication date: 9/1/2012
  • Series: Wells of Knowledge Science Series
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 815,172
  • Age range: 6 - 9 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 10.50 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author


Robert E. Wells is the author and illustrator of many intriguing and award-winning science books for children, including Can You Count to a Googol? and Why Do Elephants Need the Sun? He lives with his wife in Wenatchee, Washington.

Robert E. Wells is the author and illustrator of many intriguing and award-winning science books for children, including Can You Count to a Googol? and Why Do Elephants Need the Sun? He lives with his wife in Wenatchee, Washington.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 30, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    CAN WE SHARE THE WORLD WITH TIGERS? by Robert E. Wells is anothe

    CAN WE SHARE THE WORLD WITH TIGERS? by Robert E. Wells is another interesting Children's books/Science. Standard Core: Science series. Age Range: 6-9 years. Filled with information on Wildlife conservation,endangered species,India,and Bengal Tigers to name a few. Very informative and educational. Educators,students,Science bluffs,and young readers alike will enjoy this title. The world of Science has never been so fun. Very intriguing for children,young readers and old alike will get to explore the world of extinct plants and animals as well as information on Earth and how to help prevent extinction. Also as a glossary.Easy to follow. A must read! I don't like science particularly but truly enjoyed this title. Received for an honest review from the publisher.
    RATING: 4
    HEAT RATING: NONE(CHILDREN'S BOOKS)
    REVIEWED BY: AprilR, My Book Addiction Reviews

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