Can We Talk about Race?: And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation

Overview

In Can We Talk About Race? psychologist and educator Beverly Daniel Tatum, one of our leading commentators on race and schools, analyzes some of the most resonant issues in American education and race relations.
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Can We Talk about Race?: And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation

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Overview

In Can We Talk About Race? psychologist and educator Beverly Daniel Tatum, one of our leading commentators on race and schools, analyzes some of the most resonant issues in American education and race relations.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"What Tatum seeks to do above all is trigger sometimes challenging discussions about race, and infuse those discussions with a reality-based focus on how race affects us all. Her latest book does that beautifully, asking touch questions, and patiently, inclusively seeking answers."—Boston Globe

"Ten years ago, Tatum's book asked the question, 'Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?' Her latest book follows up with a broader question about the nation's readiness to talk honestly about the forces that continue to make race such a thorny issue . . . A probing and ambitious start to a series of books to prod national discussion on issues of race, education, and democracy."—Vanessa Bush, Booklist

"Four research-rich, concisely written essays on race and education, including examinations of the 'resegregation of our schools,' the need for educational curricula and staff that respect the diverse communities they serve, [and] the challenges of interracial friendships . . . What Tatum seeks to do above all is trigger sometimes challenging discussions about race, and infuse those discussions with a reality-based focus on how race affects us all. Her latest book does that beautifully, asking tough questions, and patiently, inclusively seeking answers."—Chuck Leddy, Boston Globe

"Another thoughtful, personal and provocative book that will encourage discussion about many of the difficult issues still surrounding race in America—in and out of the classroom."—Marian Wright Edelman, president, Children's Defense Fund

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807032855
  • Publisher: Beacon
  • Publication date: 4/15/2008
  • Pages: 168
  • Sales rank: 132,135
  • Product dimensions: 5.52 (w) x 8.48 (h) x 0.46 (d)

Meet the Author

Beverly Daniel Tatum is author of "Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?" and Assimilation Blues. She is currently president of Spelman College in Atlanta, where she lives with her husband.
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Table of Contents

Introduction: Can We Talk about Race?     ix
The Resegregation of Our Schools and the Affirmation of Identity     1
Connecting the Dots: How Race in America's Classrooms Affects Achievement     39
"What Kind of Friendship Is That?": The Search for Authenticity, Mutuality, and Social Transformation in Cross-Racial Relationships     83
In Search of Wisdom: Higher Education for a Changing Democracy     105
Afterword     127
Acknowledgments     133
Notes     135
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 20, 2009

    More timely now than ever

    I was halfway through this book when a family health crisis distracted me. A lot has happened since then, including the election of the first African American president. According to many white pundits, January 20 2009 marked the official end of racism in America...making this book all the more critical because now we're even LESS likely to talk openly and honestly about race than we were before.

    Each chapter in the book is based on a lecture in the "Race, Education and Democracy" series at Simmons College. In each, the author seamlessly weaves together personal experience, current events, factual data and policy analysis to help us not only understand where we are, but where we need to be and how we might get there.

    The first chapter explains that school segregation (or as she puts it, "resegregation") is still very much with us, and what needs to happen if we are to move beyond it. The second chapter examines why this even matters: because race in American classrooms is effecting achievement. The third chapter explores the thorny issue of cross-racial friendships, and questions whether we can have social change if we don't have interpersonal social connection. The final chapter takes us in search of wisdom, providing examples of ways to cultivate leadership.

    This book is more timely than ever. In a way, I'm glad I waited to finish it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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