Can You Keep a Secret?

Can You Keep a Secret?

by P. J. Petersen, Meredith Johnson
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

With great school scenes, a surefire subject for a first chapter book. Secrets are in the air. A big surprise birthday party is being planned. Someone in class has brought in a little snake that has gotten loose in the classroom. Mike would like to be in on these and the other secrets of his friends but no one ever wants to tell him anything because he can't keep

Overview

With great school scenes, a surefire subject for a first chapter book. Secrets are in the air. A big surprise birthday party is being planned. Someone in class has brought in a little snake that has gotten loose in the classroom. Mike would like to be in on these and the other secrets of his friends but no one ever wants to tell him anything because he can't keep things to himself. His classmate Amy knows a different kind of a secret a really important one. She's bursting to share it with someone, but she doesn't know whom she can confide in, and even if she should. P. J. Petersen has a knack for finding situations that will get readers attention and hold it. His special brand of light humor, genuine understanding of kids and school dynamics, and his realistic dialogue has made him popular with the young middle-grade crowd he writes about so well. Like The Sub, his best-selling novel, this book should appeal to a wide audience of girls and boys. Easy to read and right in tune with the concerns of kids, here's the perfect book for anyone who has ever kept a secret or told one.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 2-4Mike and Amy both have secrets that they struggle for one entire school day to keep to themselves. Mike, notorious for being a blabbermouth in Mr. Warren's class, must not tell about his teacher's upcoming birthday party, and Amy must not disclose that she saw Mr. Warren kissing the kindergarten teacher. Her struggle is trusting Mike enough to tell him what she has seen, knowing that he might inadvertently let it slip out. Trust, friendship, knowing what to tell and what not to tell, and taking responsibility for mistakes are all themes in this chapter book. Johnson's black-and-white sketches capture some of the classroom antics but are not particularly engaging. The characters are flat and uninteresting, but the theme is so universally experienced that young readers should be able to identify with this otherwise lukewarm story.Linda Bindner, Athens Clarke County Library, GA
Kirkus Reviews
A lighthearted tale about a boy intent on becoming trustworthy, from the author of White Water (p. 805). Mike is well liked by his sixth-grade classmates because he is kind and thoughtful, but he has a reputation for giving away secrets. He's not malicious; the secrets come out through his well-intentioned helpfulness, or his face gives him away. The comments of his classmates—e.g., "He'll tell the whole school"—bother him so much that when he becomes party to several secrets, including some important ones, he is determined to prove that he can keep them. Unfortunately for readers, he keeps some of the secrets by lying, and Petersen doesn't address that. Nevertheless, his tone is gentle throughout, and the novel is one that could prompt good discussions.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780525458401
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
10/01/1997
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 0.57(d)
Age Range:
7 - 9 Years

Related Subjects

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >