Can You Tell an Ostrich from an Emu?

Overview

A huge bird with a long neck and big eyes looks up from eating. Then it runs away on its strong legs.

Did you just see an ostrich? Or was it an emu? These animals look very similar, but they are different. Read this book to become an expert at telling these look-alikes apart.

Learn the fascinating differences between similar animals in the Animal Look-Alikes series—part of ...

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Overview

A huge bird with a long neck and big eyes looks up from eating. Then it runs away on its strong legs.

Did you just see an ostrich? Or was it an emu? These animals look very similar, but they are different. Read this book to become an expert at telling these look-alikes apart.

Learn the fascinating differences between similar animals in the Animal Look-Alikes series—part of the Lightning Bolt Books™ collection. With high-energy designs, exciting photos, and fun text, Lightning Bolt Books™ bring nonfiction topics to life!

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kristin Harris
"Animal Look-Alikes," a series, spotlights animals with similar appearance and explains how to tell them apart. Cheetahs and leopards, dolphins and porpoises, and frogs and toads are among the duos featured in the series. Ostriches and emus look a lot alike. They both have soft shaggy feathers with long necks and small heads. However, the ostrich's neck has few feathers and its pink skin is visible while the emu's neck is covered with dark feathers. An ostrich has two toes and an emu has three. Only one of the ostrich's toes has a claw, while all three of the emu's toes have claws. Another distinctive difference is that ostriches have large wings used to protect the young and for male posturing. Emus have tiny wings. Their nesting habits are very different as well. Male and female ostriches share sitting on the eggs in the nest that can have from 15 to 60 eggs. Female emus lay 5 to 15 eggs and leave the nest while the male emu stays with the nest and cares for the eggs. Ostriches live in groups in Africa while emus live in Australia and are usually solitary. Large color-coded text and photographs make the information in this volume accessible to early readers.
School Library Journal
Gr 2–4—Crickets and grasshoppers can be told apart by the lengths of their antennae; in the first book, readers also learn that crickets can make their songs with their right or left wings. Learning the differences between reptiles and amphibians is easy in Gecko. Whether their skins are rough and dry (reptiles) or smooth and moist (amphibians), both geckos and salamanders can lose their tails to hungry predators and grow new ones. The world's two largest birds, the nine-foot-tall ostrich and the six-foot emu, live on different continents and lead very different lives. The third book compares and contrasts them on each spread. All three titles are filled with sharp, colorful photographs with engaging close-ups of special characteristics, e.g., the grasshopper's abdomen-located "ear" vs. the cricket's on its front legs. Each book has a test called "Who Am I?" to see if readers can identify the animals described in the text. "Fun Facts" add more information.—Frances E. Millhouser, formerly at Chantilly Regional Library, Fairfax County, VA
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761385554
  • Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/28/2012
  • Series: Animal Look-Alikes Series
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 592,996
  • Age range: 5 - 7 Years
  • Lexile: 570L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Buffy Silverman is the author of many books about nature and science for children. She also enjoys writing poetry for children. Buffy is lucky to live in a rural area of Michigan where inspiration is just outside the window. The sun shimmers on Stony Lake. A great blue heron flies low over the swamp. Black squirrels scamper across oak branches, stuffing leaves in their mouths and bringing them to a hollow. The animals that share her yard inspire stories and poems. With every book and article she writes, she learns more about the world.

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