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Can You Trust a Tomato in January?
     

Can You Trust a Tomato in January?

4.0 1
by Vince Staten
 
Here is the great American ritual of supermarket shopping in all its Muzak-drenched, fluorescent-lit, coupon-clipped glory. In this fascinating expedition through the world of polished linoleum-tiled aisles, find out why peanut butter doesn't stick to the roof of your mouth anymore, discover the lost connection between graham crackers and sex, and learn what's

Overview

Here is the great American ritual of supermarket shopping in all its Muzak-drenched, fluorescent-lit, coupon-clipped glory. In this fascinating expedition through the world of polished linoleum-tiled aisles, find out why peanut butter doesn't stick to the roof of your mouth anymore, discover the lost connection between graham crackers and sex, and learn what's really in the mysterious stuff they call Cool Whip.

Join author Vince Staten on his humorous and revealing journey through the secret life of our favorite supermarket items, as he uncovers the hidden histories and fascinating folklore behind the foods we take for granted. The results are truly amazing and reveal the answers to such questions as: Which has more lemon in it, Lemon Pledge or Country Time Lemonade? What is Spam-- and why is it so darn popular? What happened to the vanilla in Nabisco Nilla Wafers? Who thought of putting American cheese in an aerosol can, and is it really cheese, anyway?

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780671885786
Publisher:
Touchstone
Publication date:
07/06/1994
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
0.53(w) x 5.50(h) x 8.50(d)

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Can You Trust a Tomato in January? 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is just like the popular 'Unwrapped' television show on the Food Network. The book is organized very well and the author has a great conversational writing style that isn't overly scientific. However, if you are looking for deep insight processed foods, what exactly are those unpronouceable ingredients, and criticism about the way most Americans eat, you will not find it inside this book. What you will find are cute stories and anectedotes about popular foods from the early 90s. This book does make some statements about how produce travels very very far (usually over 1,000 miles) to get to our local supermarkets but then he does not follow up with that is why it is important to support local farmers. All in all, this is a good entertaining light read.