Canada in the Twentieth Century

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CHAPTER II. QUEBEC was actually founded by Champlain in the year 1608, and it is interesting to remember that this date approximately coincides with those of the settlement of Virginia by his famous contemporary John Smith, and ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER II. QUEBEC was actually founded by Champlain in the year 1608, and it is interesting to remember that this date approximately coincides with those of the settlement of Virginia by his famous contemporary John Smith, and the landing of the Pilgrim fathers in New England. It so fell out, therefore, that the three groups into which North American settlement may fairly be divided— those of Canada, and of the Northern and the Southern States of the Union respectively—were planted in the germ at about the same moment. Jacques Cartier, it is true, had been at Quebec some seventy years before Champlain permanently settled there; nor in this was there anything strange, for, as it was shown in the last chapter, the entrance to the Gulf of St. Lawrence was frequented yearly by hundreds of craft of many nations. Cartier, however, must have been lacking in the colonising instinct which distinguished Smith and Champlain, for he replied to the civility of the natives, whose friendship was of such vital moment, by carrying off some of their leading men to France and exhibiting them as curiosities in proof of his adventures. When he returned to the neighbourhood of Quebec four years later his reception was the reverse of cordial, due no doubt to the justifiable suspicions ol his uncivilised hosts that others of their number might at any moment be spirited away to the landof the pale faces for exhibition purposes. Cartier, however, built a fort near Cap Rouge and remained there throughout thewinter of 1541—42, whether from choice or from necessity does not appear. At any rate, he left as soon as the ice allowed him ; but off the Newfoundland coast, and apparently by accident, he ran against De Roberval, who had been commissioned by Francis I. to take command of this new country, and had...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781289568795
  • Publisher: Nabu Press
  • Publication date: 9/16/2013
  • Pages: 556
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 1.13 (d)

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CHAPTER II. QUEBEC was actually founded by Champlain in the year 1608, and it is interesting to remember that this date approximately coincides with those of the settlement of Virginia by his famous contemporary John Smith, and the landing of the Pilgrim fathers in New England. It so fell out, therefore, that the three groups into which North American settlement may fairly be divided— those of Canada, and of the Northern and the Southern States of the Union respectively—were planted in the germ at about the same moment. Jacques Cartier, it is true, had been at Quebec some seventy years before Champlain permanently settled there; nor in this was there anything strange, for, as it was shown in the last chapter, the entrance to the Gulf of St. Lawrence was frequented yearly by hundreds of craft of many nations. Cartier, however, must have been lacking in the colonising instinct which distinguished Smith and Champlain, for he replied to the civility of the natives, whose friendship was of such vital moment, by carrying off some of their leading men to France and exhibiting them as curiosities in proof of his adventures. When he returned to the neighbourhood of Quebec four years later his reception was the reverse of cordial, due no doubt to the justifiable suspicions ol his uncivilised hosts that others of their number might at any moment be spirited away to the landof the pale faces for exhibition purposes. Cartier, however, built a fort near Cap Rouge and remained there throughout the winter of 1541—42, whether from choice or from necessity does not appear. At any rate, he left as soon as the ice allowed him ; but off the Newfoundland coast, and apparently by accident,he ran against De Roberval, who had been commissioned by Francis I. to take command of this new country, and had...
Read More Show Less

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