Canada

( 80 )

Overview

When fifteen-year-old Del Parsons' parents rob a North Dakota bank, his normal life is altered forever, and a threshold is crossed that can never be uncrossed. His parents' imprisonment threatens a turbulent and uncertain future for Del and his twin sister, Berner. Fierce with resentment, Berner flees their Montana home for California. But Del is not completely abandoned. A family friend spirits him across the Canadian border toward safety and a better life. There, afloat on the Saskatchewan prairie, Del finds ...

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Overview

When fifteen-year-old Del Parsons' parents rob a North Dakota bank, his normal life is altered forever, and a threshold is crossed that can never be uncrossed. His parents' imprisonment threatens a turbulent and uncertain future for Del and his twin sister, Berner. Fierce with resentment, Berner flees their Montana home for California. But Del is not completely abandoned. A family friend spirits him across the Canadian border toward safety and a better life. There, afloat on the Saskatchewan prairie, Del finds only cold refuge from Arthur Remlinger, an enigmatic and alluring American fugitive with a dark and violent past.

Undone by the calamity of his parents' robbery, Del struggles to remake himself. But his search for grace only moves him nearer to a harrowing and murderous collision with the forces of darkness that shadow us all.

A true masterwork of haunting and spectacular vision from one of our greatest writers, Canada is a profound novel of boundaries traversed, innocence lost and reconciled, and the mysterious and consoling bonds of family. Told in spare, elegant prose, both resonant and luminous, it is destined to become a classic.

Winner of the 2013 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The first novel in six years from Pulitzer Prize winner (for Independence Day) Ford is a tragic rural farrago composed of two awkwardly joined halves. In the late 1950s, in Great Falls, Mont., teenage twins Dell and Berner Parson have different concerns: Berner’s is whether to run away with her boyfriend; Dell’s is chess and beekeeping. Their comically mismatched parents—rakish, smalltime schemer Bev and brooding, Jewish Neeva—have problems beyond a joyless union. Bev’s stolen beef scheme goes awry, leaving him owing his Cree Indian accomplices. In desperation he robs a bank, roping his wife into the crime, and Dell, peering back much later, chronicles every aspect of the intricate but misguided plan, which left his parent incarcerated and he and Berner alone. Berner runs away, and Dell ends up in the care of a shady family friend at a hunting lodge in Canada, living an even more barren and lonely existence than he had in Great Falls. The book’s first half has the makings of a succinct rural tragedy, but Dell’s inquisition of the past is so deliberate that it eventually moves from poignant to played out. The Canadian section has a mythic strangeness, but adds little, as Dell remains a passive witness to the foolhardy actions of adults. A book from Ford is always an event and his prose is assured and textured, but the whole is not heavily significant. Agent: Amanda Urban, ICM. (June)
the Oprah Magazine O
“Awe-inspiring… The laconic, grief-stricken voice of Dell, looking back on his past, trying to make some kind sense of what happened when his family imploded, keeps you turning pages, as do the quiet, thought-provoking revelations that Ford drops in throughout.”
Library Journal
Since winning the Pulitzer Prize for his 1995 novel, Independence Day, Ford has cultivated a reputation for writing lucid and compelling prose. Here, he lives up to that reputation. The story unfolds around 15-year-old Dell Parsons, whose world collapses when his parents are jailed for a bank robbery, his twin sister flees, and he is transported across the border by a family friend to an obscure town in Canada. With detailed descriptions of place, Ford connects Dell's feelings of abandonment with the equally desolate setting of a remote Canadian landscape. The novel is pervaded by a profound sense of loss—of connectedness, of familiarity, of family—set against a profound sense of discovery. By piecing together the random events in his life, Dell transcends the borders within himself to find a philosophy of life that is both fluid and cohesive. VERDICT Segmented into three parts, the narrative slowly builds into a gripping commentary on life's biggest question: Why are we here? Ford's latest work successfully expands our understanding of and sympathy for humankind.—Joshua Finnell, Denison Univ. Lib., Granville, OH
Kirkus Reviews
A great American novel by the Pulitzer Prize–winning author. This is Ford's first novel since concluding the Frank Bascombe trilogy, which began with The Sportswriter (1986), peaked with the prize-winning Independence Day (1995) and concluded with The Lay of the Land (2006). That series was for Ford what the Rabbit novels were for Updike, making this ambitious return to long-form fiction seem like something of a fresh start, but also a thematic culmination. Despite its title, the novel is as essentially all-American as Independence Day. Typically for Ford, the focus is as much on the perspective (and limitations) of its protagonist as it is on the issues that the narrative addresses. The first-person narrator is Dell Parsons, a 15-year-old living in Montana with his twin sister when their parents--perhaps inexplicably, perhaps inevitably--commit an ill-conceived bank robbery. Before becoming wards of the state, the more willful sister runs away with her boyfriend, while Dell is taken across the border to Canada, where he will establish a new life for himself after crossing another border, from innocent bystander to reluctant complicity. The first half of the novel takes place in Montana and the second in Canada, but the entire narrative is Dell's reflection, 50 years later, on the eve of his retirement as a teacher. As he ruminates on character and destiny, and ponders "how close evil is to the normal goings-on that have nothing to do with evil," he also mediates between his innocence as an uncommonly naïve teenager and whatever wisdom he has gleaned through decades of experience. Dell's perspective may well be singular and skewed, but it's articulate without being particularly perceptive or reflective. And it's the only one we have. In a particularly illuminating parenthetical aside, he confesses, "I was experiencing great confusion about what was happening, having had no experience like this in my life. I should not be faulted for not understanding what I saw." At the start of the novel's coda, when Dell explains that he teaches his students "books that to me seem secretly about my young life," he begins the list with The Heart of Darkness and The Great Gatsby. Such comparisons seem well-earned.
The New York Times Book Review
Canada is blessed with two essential strengths in equal measure—a mesmerizing story driven by authentic and fully realized characters, and a prose style so accomplished it is tempting to read each sentence two or three times before being pulled to the next…Dell's voice here—nonjudgmental, insightful, laconic and slightly melancholy but at ease with the language he's using to plumb his memory—is the central strength of this remarkable novel. Its finely wrought sentences alone are worth the price of admission, but they are also in constant service to the story of the Parsons family…Canada is a tale of what happens when we cross certain lines and can never go back. It is an examination of the redemptive power of articulated memory, and it is a masterwork by one of our finest writers working at the top of his form.
—Andre Dubus III
The New York Times
Mr. Ford has fashioned an engaging, ruminative voice for Dell. It's less self-conscious than that of the author's best-known hero, Frank Bascombe…but almost as elastic, capable of capturing the vernacular of the everyday, while addressing the big philosophical questions of choice and fate. It's a voice capable of conjuring both the soporific routines of daily life in 1960 in Great Falls, before Dell's parents turn to crime, and the harrowing, Dickensian experiences he is subjected to after their arrest.
—Michiko Kakutani
The Washington Post
…a magnificent work of Montana gothic that confirms [Ford's] position as one of the finest stylists and most humane storytellers in America…his most elegiac and profound book…Always a careful craftsman, Ford has polished the plainspoken lines of Canada to an arresting sheen. He's working somewhere between Marilynne Robinson (without the theology) and Cormac McCarthy (without the gore). The wisdom he offers throughout these pages can be heard in the hushed silence that follows this harrowing tale.
—Ron Charles
The New Yorker
“Pure vocal grace, quiet humor, precise and calm observation.”
USA Today
“A triumph of voice.... The writing... is spare, but heartbreaking.”
Washington Post
“[Canada]confirms his position as one of the finest stylists and most humane storytellers in America… his most elegiac and profound book…”
Wall Street Journal
“Robust and powerful… Ford is able to tap into something momentous and elemental about the profound moral chaos behind the actions of seemingly responsible people… Ford has dramatized the frightening discovery of the world’s anarchic heart.”
Daily Beast
“Richard Ford returns with one of his most powerful novels yet…Ford has never written better…Canada is Richard Ford’s best book since Independence Day, and despite its robbery and killings it too depends on its voice, a voice oddly calm and marked by the spare grandeur of its landscape.”
Entertainment Weekly
“Told in Ford’s exquisitely detailed, unhurried prose…Ford is interested here in the ways snap decisions can bend life in unexpected directions... Canada’s characters grapple with this... and the answers they come up with define the rest of their lives, along with this quietly thoughtful book.”
Vogue
“Masterly… in Ford’s American tragedy, filled with lost innocence and inevitable violence—a rusting carnival, a rabbit caught in a coyote’s jaws—geography feels a lot like fate.”
Christian Science Monitor
“One of the most memorably heartbreaking novels of the year.”
Men’s Journal
“[Ford’s] newest novel Canada, shows an artist in full command of his craft—sparsely elegant and bracingly direct, with a refreshing lack of irony or tricks.”
The Oregonian (Portland)
“Marvelous…Canada is a masterpiece of a story with rich language and dialogue filled with suspense, bleakness, human frailties and flaws, and a little bit of hope seen through the eyes of an adolescent boy whose emotions seem often aligned with the desolate landscape of its setting.”
St. Paul Pioneer Press
“A must-read. . . . Canada reminds us why Ford is considered one of this country’s most distinguished writers.”
Austin American-Statesman
“[A] deeply felt and magnificently imagined work…With Canada, Ford has given us his deepest exploration yet of weakness and betrayal set amid a boy’s coming of age. It is a memorable novel, suffused with love, sorrow and regret.”
Washington Independent Review of Books
“[A] novel about big truths told by a writer with clear vision…solid, satisfying craftsmanship. This is a Richard Ford novel in the tradition of his earlier work. It also is a coming-of-age story, and a story about the discovery of identity.”
Men's Journal
"[Ford’s] newest novel Canada, shows an artist in full command of his craft—sparsely elegant and bracingly direct, with a refreshing lack of irony or tricks."
Colm Toibin
“This is a brilliant and engrossing portrait of a fragile American family and the fragile consciousness of a teenage boy. It is also fascinating in the way it reveals the plot in the opening page and then winds backwards, offering a more and more intimate version of the story.”
Men’s Journal
“[Ford’s] newest novel Canada, shows an artist in full command of his craft—sparsely elegant and bracingly direct, with a refreshing lack of irony or tricks.”
O: the Oprah Magazine
“Awe-inspiring… The laconic, grief-stricken voice of Dell, looking back on his past, trying to make some kind sense of what happened when his family imploded, keeps you turning pages, as do the quiet, thought-provoking revelations that Ford drops in throughout.”
The Barnes & Noble Review

Richard Ford once shot a book by a woman who'd given him a bad review. It wasn't a terrible review — it had its qualifications, even its moments of high praise — but that didn't stop Ford from mailing Alice Hoffman her own ventilated work as a sort of underworld warning. When Colson Whitehead demolished Ford's story collection A Multitude of Sins in the pages of The New York Times, Ford decided not to do anything rash. Instead, he waited two years for the chance to see Whitehead in person. Then he spat on him. Whitehead took this in stride: "I would like to warn the many other people who panned the book that they might want to get a rain poncho, in case of inclement Ford."

Good one. Yet, given that Whitehead had already enjoyed his pen-is- mightier moment in the review itself, one can't help an atavistic wish that he'd simply punched Ford's lights out. There's a point at which being the bigger man is as much a reflex as putting up one's dukes. And it is precisely Ford's willingness to be the smaller man — to indulge crazy impulses, to embarrass himself — that qualifies him to write a book like Canada, which is largely about how a single moment of weakness or folly can hurl one into unfamiliar country, with no hope of returning home. Fans of Ford's excellent Bascombe trilogy know his flair for human frailty, human perplexity, but in Canada Ford mingles with a far lower class of men.

Canada might as well be a deliberate rejoinder to Whitehead's review, which alleged that Ford was preoccupied with the tedious affairs and "lukewarm lust" of white upper-middle-class professionals. Canada's hero is a child in Montana, a boy named Dell Parsons whose life is ruined by his parents' decision to rob a North Dakota bank. Bev and Neeva Parsons, an affable, fatally optimistic southerner and his more circumspect Jewish wife, are no Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker. They aren't driven by a lust for adventure, nor are they even very much in love. (Their union is more or less the fault of getting pregnant with twins, Dell and his sister, Berner, during "one hasty encounter after meeting at a party honoring returning airmen" in 1945.) Only Bev is even properly a criminal; it is his ill-advised scheme, involving Indians and trafficking in stolen cattle, that lands the family in trouble with the wrong sort of people. Desperate times lead to where they always do.

We know from page one that the robbery will occur, but Ford takes his time getting there. Along the way, one develops a sense that fiction writers — Ford, at least — might make the best criminals. Ford's elegant description of what goes wrong, a perfect inversion of what Bev and Neeva expect to go right, is summed up by Dell's pitch- black comic insight: "My parents simply did not understand life in small prairie towns, where everyone notices everything. . . . As it turned out, my father wasn't all that memorable to anyone in Creekmore — until it was time to testify against him, when he became very memorable." This passage, and the list of missteps that precedes it, and the pages of snowballing panic and recklessness preceding that, suggest that Ford might enjoy a second career as a noir screenwriter.

But Canada is not a crime novel. Ford's meticulous construction of the Parsonses' brief and undistinguished criminal career is impressive, but only half the story. What becomes of Dell, his parents having been carted off and his sister having run away, is alluded to in the title: He must cross a border. The life he desired, the one he was on the cusp of having — school, chess, beekeeping — is behind him forever. Once Dell is smuggled by Mildred, a family friend, to Saskatchewan, where he becomes the charge of her bachelor brother, the novel takes on an almost numinous life of its own. In Ford's telling, our northern neighbor is an uncanny hinterland, similar to America in trivial ways but forbiddingly different in others.

[Mildred] said Canada had dollars for money, but theirs were different colored and was sometimes mysteriously worth more than ours. She said Canada had its own Indians and treated them better than we treated ours, and Canada was bigger than America, though it was mostly empty and inhospitable and covered with ice much of the time. I rode along thinking about these things and how they could become true just by passing two huts marooned in the middle of nowhere.
Beyond this point of entry — from which there can be no return, lest Dell become property of the State of Montana — lies an experience that places Canada squarely in the line of Oliver Twist and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Dell's keeper, Arthur Remlinger, a dapper and mysterious hotelier, and Charley Quarters, his man Friday, are Ford's answer to Fagin and Sykes, to the Duke and the Dauphin. (The use to which they put Dell is unexpected and better left unsaid.) Ford has achieved something here that few authors can carry off — and, frankly, that nothing in his Bascombe books suggested an ability to do. He has written a book for adults from which any brave and curious child could derive a vast, if necessarily partial, benefit. This is a better thing, to be sure, than what we tend to get today: books for children from which adults imagine themselves to derive some nourishment.

That it might serve as YA literature the way books by Dickens or Twain do is not the main value of Canada,merely a measure of its quality. The cruel and immutable realities it unveils for poor Dell — that life turns on a dime; that people (even our parents) may not be what they seem or what we wish them to be; that we should be prepared for the unfamiliar — are our common lot. They should be learned early, and, sad to say, revisited often.

A writer living in southern Connecticut, Stefan Beck has written for The Wall Street Journal, The New York Sun, The Weekly Standard, The New Criterion, and other publications. He also writes a food blog, The Poor Mouth, which can be found at www.stefanbeckonline.com/tpm/.

Reviewer: Stefan Beck

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061692048
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/22/2012
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 678,804
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard Ford

Richard Ford is one of America's most lauded literary figures. Winner of both the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Pulitzer Prize for his novel Independence Day, Ford is also the author of The Sportswriter, The Lay of the Land, and the story collections Rock Springs and Women with Men. He is editor of several anthologies, including The Granta Book of the American Long Story and Best American Short Stories 1990. He lives in East Boothbay, Maine.

Biography

Richard Ford lived with his parents in Jackson, Mississippi, until he was eight years old, at which time his father suffered a near-fatal heart attack. After that, he shuttled back and forth between his parents' home in Jackson and Little Rock, Arkansas, where his maternal grandparents managed a hotel. Ford describes his childhood as happy and contented -- at least until he was 16, when his father died and the young man began to seriously think about his future.

Although he attended Michigan State University with the vague intention of going into hotel management, Ford soon switched over to literature. After graduation, he married his college sweetheart, Kristina Hensley, but was having trouble settling on a career direction. He applied for several jobs (including the police and the CIA!) and even started law school. It was only after none of these panned out that he begin to consider writing for a living. On the advice of a former teacher, he applied to graduate school and was accepted into the University of California at Irvine, where he came under the happy, unexpected tutelage of Oakley Hall and E. L. Doctorow.

He began work on his first novel, the story of two drifters whose lives intersect on a desolate island in the Mississippi River. An excerpt appeared in The Paris Review, and the book was accepted for publication. In 1976, A Piece of My Heart was released to good reviews, but Ford bristled at being pigeonholed by critics as a regional writer. "I'm a Southerner, God knows," Ford said in an interview with the literary journal Ploughshares, "but I always wanted my books to exist outside the limits of so-called Southern writing."

In the early '80s, Ford's wife (who holds a Ph.D. in urban planning) was teaching at NYU, and the couple was living in Princeton, New Jersey. Disillusioned with novel writing, Ford took a job with the glossy New York magazine Inside Sports, but in 1982 the magazine folded, leaving him unemployed again. Tentatively he returned to fiction with the glimmer of a story idea based loosely on his most recent experiences. Several years in the making, The Sportswriter introduced Frank Bascombe, a middle-aged writer from suburban New Jersey who forsakes his promising literary career to pen articles for a glossy New York magazine. Published in 1986, the novel was named one of Time magazine's five best books of the year and was nominated for a PEN/Faulkner Award.

Ford claims that he never intended to write a trilogy around Frank Bascombe. But, in between other literary projects (including an acclaimed 1987 short story collection, Rock Springs), he found himself inexorably drawn back into the life of his melancholic protagonist. In 1995, the superb sequel, Independence Day, won both the PEN/Faulkner Award and the Pulitzer Prize. Then, in 2006, Ford concluded the saga with The Lay of the Land, a bittersweet set piece nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award.

Although Ford modestly maintained that the only reason he won the Pulitzer Prize was that Philip Roth had not written a novel that year, in fact his angst-ridden suburban Everyman Frank Bascombe ranks alongside Roth's Nathan Zuckerman (or, for that matter, John Updike's Rabbit Angstrom) as one of American literature's most unforgettable, richly drawn characters. For a man who stumbled into writing with very little forethought or design, Richard Ford has indeed come far.

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    1. Date of Birth:
      February 16, 1944
    2. Place of Birth:
      Jackson, Mississippi
    1. Education:
      B.A., Michigan State University, 1966; M.F.A., University of California, Irvine, 1970

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 80 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(21)

4 Star

(18)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(15)

1 Star

(14)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 80 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 12, 2012

    Slow going but worth it

    Bev Parsons and his wife Neeva are a mismatched pair. He is a smiling gregarious six-foot tall retired Air Force bombardier from the south. The daughter of Jewish immigrants, she is an intense and aloof diminutive school teacher. A hasty marriage due to an impending birth brings these two together, and an equally hasty decision to rob a bank tears the entire family apart leaving their fifteen year old twins Dell and Berner orphaned. Neeva, anticipating an impending arrest, had arranged for a co-worker to intercept the twins before they could be placed into the care of the state, but the two still spend a few days adrift. Berner decides to follow her own path. Dell is transported over the border and into Canada and the care of Arthur Remlinger. Remlinger is an expat American educated and ejected from Harvard whose outward demeanor fools few.

    Told majestically from Dell’s perspective Canada is his story. He is an unremarkable fifteen year old who’s only wish is to start the coming school year by joining the chess club yet finds himself as far away from normal as possible. Dell survives to convey a life lived and suggests the means to get there.

    Richard Ford has managed to bring the characters and the Canadian prairie to life. The story unfolds slowly with the introduction of the characters, but then the pages fly. I do have a few issues with the novel. It truly is a slow go for about 100 pages, and the ending did seem a bit rushed, but overall Ford paints pictures with words and the time spent was well worth the effort.

    13 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 3, 2012

    Excellent novel. Great characters. Dark humor. Ford's novels

    Excellent novel. Great characters. Dark humor. Ford's novels are always entertaining and enlightening. One of my favorite authors. I was waiting patiently for this book to be published, and I wasn't disappointed.

    7 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 21, 2012

    While I wouldn't recommend it to a friend I am glad I read it.

    While I wouldn't recommend it to a friend I am glad I read it. The writing is well done but it was very over-hyped. I hated the long story about the geese because I am an animal lover and if I hadn't pushed myself to page 100 I would never have finished it. There were occasional learning points but overall nothing I could recommend.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2012

    Both an easy and a difficult read

    This story of about a life-changing/determining six months in the life of a 15 year old boy as told by his 65 year old self is both an easy and a difficult read. Easy first - the languid first-person account of external events that tear 15-year old Dell from all life's moorings - parents, twin sister, hope-for friends & future - is so well written. Writing a review involves remembering the reading experience, and my recollection seems very much like having listened attentively to the 65-year old Dell tell the story, relaxed and analytical, emotionally detached from the events of the past. The difficult aspect of reading this book is getting through the detailed examination of very small & subtle demonstrations of bad judgment that are the hallmarks of the self-centered. It makes for a very slow start - not to mention exasperation felt towards the characters. All in all, I'm glad to have read it.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2012

    Pace too slow

    This was my first and last Richard Ford book. BORING! The pace was dog slow, plot was absent, with a couple random bizarre incidents and character traits tossed in. I finished it only because it was my book group's pick. The sole redeeming quality of this sad tale was some of Dell's reflections sprinkled throughout the book.

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2012

    Canada

    Good story

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2012

    Just got bored with this book. Can't recommend it.

    Just got bored with this book. Can't recommend it.

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2012

    Cody on earpiece to mae

    I need you to take this container to result 10 stat befre it blows up be very careful location is result 3

    2 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 21, 2012

    Canada is an intimate story of a young man's maturation. It may

    Canada is an intimate story of a young man's maturation. It may seem boring and slow because Ford is locked into the cadence of a teenager's sense of time. Like Dell, acclimate yourself to the daily rhythms of his existence and relish this thoughtful gem.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2012

    Can't recommend this book

    It was filled with promise, but halfway through the book it just didn't deliver. He is a wonderful writer, but CANADA isn't his best.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2012

    Boring

    So boring. I had to force myself to finish this book. Don't waste your time.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 12, 2012

    Almost a 1 star but I gave it a generous 2. I only bought this

    Almost a 1 star but I gave it a generous 2. I only bought this book because it is set in Great Falls, MT where I had lived for 8 years...that is only why I finished reading it. SPOILER. Twins have sex with each other. Dad sells tainted meat to the railroad. Mom and Dad rob a bank and are sent to jail. Twins split up and the boy goes to Canada and meets some real BORING people. The story ends in Minneapolis. What a waste of time and money to purchase this book. WARNING!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2012

    Slow.... Slow...One of the worst books I've read this year.... p

    Slow.... Slow...One of the worst books I've read this year.... plot??
    what plot?? characters??? all left wide open - in fact half the
    characters in the story were... pointless.... dont waste your money.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 27, 2012

    To Boring to Finish

    Wow, I made it to part two but I give up. This book has unlikable boring characters & repeats stuff over & over. Also did not appreciate the relationship between the siblings. That was unnecessary & added nothing to the story. Save yourself some time & money & read something else.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2012

    Outstanding!

    An insightful and provocative study of life and its struggles, Ford leads the reader to examine how the good and bad ... all of it ... weave together to make us who we are. While not a fast or easy read, it is an outstanding novel and study of the human condition.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 22, 2012

    I would have to agree with his critics. Why I wasted my money o

    I would have to agree with his critics. Why I wasted my money on this pointless diatribe is beyond me.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2012

    Boring and no point to it

    It is a very slow read. It is called Canada and the main character does't get there till halfway through the book.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2012

    Introspection, self examination, insight vs beating a horse to death

    A good story, but a long LONG book and not related to its length. The author should have left a little more for the reader to wrestle rather than seemingly presenting this child's every thought. Good book. Could have been great.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2012

    Just ok

    Rather over-hyped. Pretty slow in the middle and all around depressing. I would pass on it.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2012

    Disappointing

    Slow going through most of the book

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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