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Canadian Immigration Made Easy: How to immigrate into Canada ( All Classes ) with Employment Search Strategies for Skilled Workers

Overview

This is a 3 in 1 guide. The 1st part of this guide provides information about the new Immigration and Refugee Protection Act effective from June 28, 2002. It covers all immigration categories. It describes the eligibility criteria for Canadian immigration in every class and how to apply in every category.
The 2nd part of this guide provides comprehensive step-by-step settlement information that you must know before arriving in Canada. This information will help you to ...
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Overview

This is a 3 in 1 guide. The 1st part of this guide provides information about the new Immigration and Refugee Protection Act effective from June 28, 2002. It covers all immigration categories. It describes the eligibility criteria for Canadian immigration in every class and how to apply in every category.
The 2nd part of this guide provides comprehensive step-by-step settlement information that you must know before arriving in Canada. This information will help you to successfully settle in Canada by knowing Canadian laws, education, taxation and healthcare systems, Canadian culture and labour market. Addresses for newcomers to find help within their communities throughout Canada.
The 3rd part of this guide is the most important one, which provides employment search guide for skilled workers who are seeking employment in Canadian workplace.
If you do not have any degree or diploma and cannot qualify for Canadian immigration under point system or any other category but if you have 1-3 years of apprenticeship and experience in your skill with good English or French language ability or both then you can try for Temporary Work Permit in Canada based on job offer. Canada issue around 90,000 temporary work permits every year and this is the shortest route to be in Canada allowing you to discover new lifestyle.
This guide also contains an article on job search strategies in Canadian workplace approved by Human Resource Development Canada (HRDC) with a comprehensive list of job search websites for all professions from Hi-Tech to traditional, where you will be able to register online with thousands of Canadian and American recruiting agencies and employers for free. There is also a list of necessary websites for people who wants to start a small business in Canada and for people with disabilities.

This book has been produced with the approval of Citizenship and Immigration (CIC) Canada and with the authorization of Communication Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1M4

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780973314007
  • Publisher: Self-Help Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/28/2003
  • Pages: 216
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 0.49 (d)

Read an Excerpt

IMMIGRATING TO CANADA

Every year, Canada welcomes thousands of new residents. Coming to Canada as an immigrant is an exciting opportunity, but also a great challenge.

If you are interested in immigrating to Canada, you have a number of options when applying for permanent residence status. Read about these programs and decide which class suits you and your family best.

Immigration Classes

Skilled Worker Class ImmigrationCanada values the skills and experiences that foreign professionals and workers bring with them. Check to see if your skills and experience qualify you to come to Canada as a skilled worker.
Business Class ImmigrationCanada has a strong economic culture. If you have experience running or investing in businesses, you may qualify to come to Canada as a business immigrant.
Family Class ImmigrationFamily class immigration reunites families in Canadian homes. Learn how to sponsor your family member or come to Canada as a member of the family class.
International AdoptionAdopting children from abroad can be a long process. This is to protect children's rights. Learn about what you need to do to bring an adoptive child to Canada.
Provincial NominationMost provinces in Canada have programs to encourage immigrants to settle in their province and benefit their economies. Learn about settling in one of Canada's provinces as a provincial nominee.
Quebec-Selected ImmigrationQuebec is responsible for selecting immigrants who wish to settle in Quebec. Find out how to apply to be selected to settle in Quebec.

WHO IS A BUSINESS IMMIGRANT?
Business immigrants are people who can invest in, or start businesses in Canada and are expected to support the development of a strong and prosperous Canadian economy. The Business Immigration Programs seek to attract people experienced in business to Canada.
Business immigrants are selected based on their ability to become economically established in Canada.
There are three classes of business immigrants:

Immigrating to Canada as
a Self-employed Person

As a self-employed person, you must have relevant experience in cultural activities, athletics or farm management. You must also have the intention and ability to establish a business that will, at a minimum, create employment for yourself. You must make a significant contribution to cultural activities or athletics or purchase and manage a farm in Canada.
No immigration conditions are imposed on this class. You must have enough money to support yourself and your family members after you arrive in Canada.

WELCOME TO CANADA!

ongratulations! You have taken a big step. Moving to a new country takes courage. It also creates exciting opportunities and new beginnings. Taking the time to learn what to expect -- and what is expected of you -- will help you succeed. This guide tells you a little about what it's like to live in Canada. It also lets you know who can help if you need more information. We hope it will help you adapt to your new life. Be assured that those who already live in Canada add their wishes for your happiness and success in your new country.
Your first year in Canada will be emotional and full of change. You may be looking for a place to live, a job, and schools for your children. You will probably make many new friends. Some of them will know how it feels to move to a new community or new country.
Regardless of your situation, being a newcomer may mean giving up some familiar things for a new way of life. As a result, you may feel anxious or afraid, especially during the first few days and weeks. Almost all newcomers experience these emotions as they settle in. Feeling at home in a new country takes time.
The best way to adjust to your new community is to become involved! Do not hesitate to speak English or French, even if you make mistakes. Understanding and speaking one of Canada's official languages will help you adapt more easily. As you talk with the people you meet, you will feel more in control of your new life. Use each day as an opportunity to learn. Ask questions whenever you need to. Most people are pleased to help. Canadians believe in the spirit of community. No matter which city or town you choose to live in, you will find people who can help you adapt to your new life, and fit into Canadian society.
In the weeks, months and years ahead, you will have many opportunities to participate fully in Canadian life. Take them. You and your family can grow together, side by side with other Canadians, and make a better life for everyone. This is your new home. Welcome to Canada!

WHY STRATEGIZE?
The Canadian Workplace Reality

Job search in Canada is no longer a matter of completing an application form and hoping for a job offer. Canadian businesses involved in technological innovation, corporate restructuring and unpredictable fluctuations in the recent global economy can no longer guarantee a job for life for you.

How people work is changing and so are occupational titles. Individuals are encouraged to look for work that matches their personal values and talents. The term "job" has transformed into "meaningful work" which is planned and has personal value in addition to the monetary compensation.

The onus is on the job seeker to research, to track and to secure employment options. These job opportunities may materialize as contract jobs, part-time jobs, "work-from-home" jobs, job sharing arrangements, casual assignments and long-term arrangements -or any combination thereof. To ensure your financial security, you need to constantly market your expertise to potential consumers of service.

Many internationally educated professionals in Canada have described barriers to enter their career after their arrival in Canada. The acculturation process may create such scenarios as:

· You may not necessarily achieve your career goals immediately
· You may have to take the time to gain Canadian accreditation for your professional credentials
· You may have to settle for alternative employment in the short-term to accommodate your life style and to upgrade your English language skills
· You may have to upgrade your technical skills on your own time to become employable in your field of interest.

Personal career management has become the responsibility of the individual worker who is expected to continuously create employment opportunities in keeping with a focused and planned career path

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Table of Contents

CHAPTER - I

Immigrating to Canada
Immigration Classes

Immigrating to Canada as a Skilled Worker
Will You Qualify as a Skilled Worker?
Six Selection Factors and Pass Mark
Principal Applicant
Things to Consider Before Applying
Application Fees
Additional Fees
Proof of Funds
How Much Money Should you Bring?
Disclosure of funds:
Medical Examinations
Authorized Doctors

Choosing a Destination in Canada
· British Columbia
· Alberta
· Saskatchewan

· Manitoba
· Ontario
· Quebec
· New Brunswick
· Nova Scotia
· Prince Edward Island
· Newfoundland and Labrador
· Yukon
· Northwest Territories
· Nunavut

Business Class Immigration
Who is a business immigrant?
Classes of Business Immigrants
Investors
Entrepreneurs
Self-employed persons

Immigrating to Canada as an Investor
Details for the Investor Program:
Regulatory Requirements
How to Apply
When and How to Pay Your Investment
Application for Business Immigrants

The Fee Schedule

Immigrating to Canada as an Entrepreneur
Details of the Entrepreneur Program:
Regulatory Requirements
How to Apply
Application for Business Immigrants
The Fee Schedule
Entrepreneur Counseling and Monitoring Guides

Immigrating to Canada as a Self-employed Person
Details of the Self-Employed Person Program:
Regulatory Requirements
How to Apply
Application for Business Immigrants
The Fee Schedule

Family Class Immigration
Spouse or Common-Law Partner in Canada Class
Sponsoring a Relative or Family Member
Applying as a Sponsored Immigrant

Applications for Sponsorship and Immigration to Canada from Abroad
Applications for Sponsorship and Immigration from Within Canada
Changes to Submission of Family Class Applications
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

International Adoption
The adoption process
The Immigration Process

Provincial Nomination
Provincial Nominee Program - Contact Information

Quebec-Selected Immigration
Immigrating to Quebec as a Skilled Worker
What Happens After You Apply
The Application Assessment Process
Processing Time
Checking the Status of Your Application

Who May Represent You
Do You Need A Representative?
Who Can Act As A Representative?
General Points
Lawyers
Immigration Consultants
Dealing With Representatives
Information Given To CIC Must Be Truthful
Where To Go For Help If Things Go Wrong
If Your Representative is A Lawyer Practicing in Canada
If Your Representative is A Consultant Practicing in Canada
If Your Representative is Either A Lawyer Or An Immigration Consultant Practicing in Canada
If Your Representative's Place of Business is Abroad
CIC Call Centre

You Asked About Immigration And Citizenship
An Introduction to Citizenship and Immigration Canada
Immigration
Immigration Operations
Immigration Operations in Canada
Immigration Operations Abroad
Immigration and Refugee Board
Federal-Provincial Agreements
Immigrating to Canada
Family Class Immigration
Economic Classes
Refugees
Refugee Protection in Canada
Settlement Programs And Services
Temporary Residents
Foreign Students
Temporary Foreign Workers
North American Free Trade Agreement
Enforcement
Appeals
Questions About Status
Citizenship
Becoming A Canadian Citizen
The Citizenship Test
The Citizenship Ceremony
Criminal Records
Other Commonly Asked Questions
About Canadian Citizenship

FACTS and FIGURES 2001
Immigration Overview
Immigration Report Card, 2001
Immigration By Source Area
Immigration By Top Ten Source Countries
Montreal By Top Ten Source Countries
Toronto By Top Ten Source Countries
Vancouver By Top Ten Source Countries
Business Class By Top Ten Source Countries
Skilled Workers By Top Ten Source Countries
Provincial Nominees By Province
Other Class By Category
New Immigrants 2001 & 2002 Comparison

CHAPTER - II
WELCOME TO CANADA
Sources of information
How to find information
Getting around
Using the telephone
The telephone book
Call centres and touch-tone telephones
Emergency 911
Voice mail
Pay phones
Directory assistance
Toll-free numbers
Telephone services for people with special needs
Using computers
Public libraries

GETTING TO KNOW CANADA
BASIC SERVICES
Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) Call Centres
Immigrant-serving organizations
Host Program
Immigrant Settlement and Adaptation Program (ISAP)
LINC (Language Instruction for Newcomers)

Government services

WHERE TO BEGIN
· Papers and other identity documents
· Using public transportation
· Where to stay
· Canadian money
· Shopping
· Going out of town

HEALTH SERVICES
· Applying for a Health Insurance Card
· Finding doctors and clinics
· Emergency help
· Immunization for children
· Immunization for adults
· Medical surveillance
· Pregnancy
· To find out more...
ESTABLISHING YOURSELF
FINDING A PLACE TO LIVE
· Renting
· Your rights as a tenant
· Buying
· Heat and hydro
· Getting a telephone
· Furnishing
· To find out more...
PROTECTING YOUR MONEY
· Banks and other financial institutions
· Opening an account
· Using banking machines
· Direct deposit
· Sending money
· Applying for credit
· Telemarketing
· To find out more...

FINDING A JOB
· Immigrant-Serving Organizations can help
· Human Resources Development Canada offices
· Using the newspaper and other resources
· Documents and foreign credentials
· Getting paid
· Working for yourself
· Business and travel
· Daycare
· Labour laws and human rights
· Volunteering
LEARNING ENGLISH OR FRENCH
EDUCATION
· Finding schools
· Enrolling your children
· Adult education
· To find out more...

Taxation
Canadian law
Transportation
· Getting a driver's licence
· Buying a car
· Use of seat belts
· Car seats for children
· In case of an accident
· To find out more...

Keeping in touch
Becoming a Canadian
A few last words
Living in Canada: Your checklist
Finding Help in Your Community
Key Immigrant Serving Organizations Across Canada

CHAPTER - III

WHY STRATEGIZE?
· The Canadian Workplace Reality
· Become a Career Strategist
· Essential Concepts to Remember in Work Search
· The Strategy To Discover Work Opportunities
· Some Websites To Strategize Your Research...
· Top 40 Interview Questions
· Interview Practice - An Example
· Some Useful Addresses
· List Of Associations of Professional Engineers
· Provincially-mandated Evaluation Services
· Other Evaluation Services
· Labour Market Information by Province and Territory
· Other Technical Associations

List Of Suggested Job Search Web Sites By Category
Hi-tech, Engineering, Non Profit Organization
Health, Education, Women, Multi Media
Tourism & Hospitality
Agriculture
Arts and Entertainment
Oil & Gas Industry
People with disabilities
Web sites for Youth and Recent Graduates
Newcomers

Career Planning and Job Search Strategies
Labour Market / Industry information
Newspapers/Magazine
Small Business Information
Web sites where you can post your resume
Education & Training
Tutorial sites
Employment Resource Centers
Volunteer sites
Free e-mails sites & single search engines
Meta search engines

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Preface

This is a 3 in 1 guide. The 1st part of this guide provides information about the new Immigration and Refugee Protection Act effective from June 28, 2002. It covers all immigration categories like skilled worker class, business class, family class (sponsorship) and provincial Nomination. It describes the eligibility criteria for Canadian immigration in every class and how to apply in every category.
The 2nd part of this guide will provide you comprehensive step-by-step settlement information that you must know before arriving in Canada. This information will help you to successfully settle in Canada by knowing Canadian laws, education, taxation and healthcare systems, Canadian culture and labour market. Addresses for newcomers to find help within their communities throughout Canada.
The 3rd part of this guide is the most important one, which provides employment search guide for skilled workers who are seeking employment in Canadian workplace.
If you do not have any degree or diploma and cannot qualify for Canadian immigration under point system or any other category but if you have 1-3 years of apprenticeship and experience in your skill with good English or French language ability or both then you can try for Temporary Work Permit in Canada based on job offer. Canada issue around 90,000 temporary work permits every year and this is the shortest route to be in Canada allowing you to discover new lifestyle.
This guide also contains an article on job search strategies in Canadian workplace approved by Human Resource Development Canada (HRDC) with a comprehensive list of job search websites for all professions from Hi-Tech to traditional, where you will be able to register online with thousands of Canadian and American recruiting agencies and employers for free. There is also a list of necessary websites for people who wants to start a small business in Canada and for people with disabilities.

This book has been produced with the approval of Citizenship and Immigration (CIC) Canada and with the authorization of Communication Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1M4 Canada

Read More Show Less

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