Cancer Control

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Overview

Cancer control is the term applied to the development of integrated population-based approaches to reduce the incidence and mortality from cancer and to minimize its impact on affected individuals and on the community. It covers a spectrum of prevention, early diagnosis, optimal treatment, and supportive and palliative care. It emphasizes the application of new knowledge gained through research to achieve current best practice. Cancer control has become a political priority in many countries in recent years, with the evolution of both national and regional cancer control strategic plans. The integrated nature of cancer control, involving a wide spectrum of health care professionals, researchers, and health managers and planners, is reflected in this multi-disciplinary text, which is the first in this rapidly developing field.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Therese A Dolecek, PhD (University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health)
Description: This is a comprehensive account of cancer control, a concept that in recent years has been driving major initiatives in most developed countries. The editors note, "Cancer control aims to reduce the incidence and mortality of cancer, and to enhance the quality of life of those affected by cancer, through an integrated and coordinated approach directed to primary prevention, early detection, treatment, rehabilitation and palliation."
Purpose: The book addresses the need for an integrated and understandable overview of the spectrum of topics that constitute the evolving area known as cancer control. Given that cancer ranks high in morbidity and mortality, especially but not exclusively in developed countries, the objectives are very worthwhile. Indeed, the book is successful in accomplishing those objectives.
Audience: This is appropriate for faculty and students in health-related academic settings as well as administrators and healthcare professionals involved in the many aspects of work associated with cancer. The editors and chapter authors are all experienced through either their affiliations with departments in academic institutions or positions in highly recognized cancer agencies.
Features: Overarching cancer control areas include cancer burden descriptions, elements of cancer prevention, screening and early detection, bridging science and practice, patient-level treatment and quality of life issues, and integration of cancer control in various populations. The discussion of cancer control program models currently being implemented in various countries is very informative, especially for those contemplating or developing their own programs.
Assessment: The editors' goal was to produce a book that includes all of the currently recognized components of cancer control in a single source. At present, such information is only found in separate chapters in publications or articles focusing on cancer control aspects of specific areas such as cancer prevention or early detection. With the completion of this extremely ambitious endeavor, the editors have succeeded in producing a consolidated resource to understand and address the many important issues associated with cancer control.
From The Critics
Reviewer:Therese A Dolecek, PhD(University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health)
Description:This is a comprehensive account of cancer control, a concept that in recent years has been driving major initiatives in most developed countries. The editors note, "Cancer control aims to reduce the incidence and mortality of cancer, and to enhance the quality of life of those affected by cancer, through an integrated and coordinated approach directed to primary prevention, early detection, treatment, rehabilitation and palliation.
Purpose:The book addresses the need for an integrated and understandable overview of the spectrum of topics that constitute the evolving area known as cancer control. Given that cancer ranks high in morbidity and mortality, especially but not exclusively in developed countries, the objectives are very worthwhile. Indeed, the book is successful in accomplishing those objectives.
Audience:This is appropriate for faculty and students in health-related academic settings as well as administrators and healthcare professionals involved in the many aspects of work associated with cancer. The editors and chapter authors are all experienced through either their affiliations with departments in academic institutions or positions in highly recognized cancer agencies.
Features:Overarching cancer control areas include cancer burden descriptions, elements of cancer prevention, screening and early detection, bridging science and practice, patient-level treatment and quality of life issues, and integration of cancer control in various populations. The discussion of cancer control program models currently being implemented in various countries is very informative, especially for those contemplating or developing their own programs.
Assessment:The editors' goal was to produce a book that includes all of the currently recognized components of cancer control in a single source. At present, such information is only found in separate chapters in publications or articles focusing on cancer control aspects of specific areas such as cancer prevention or early detection. With the completion of this extremely ambitious endeavor, the editors have succeeded in producing a consolidated resource to understand and address the many important issues associated with cancer control.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199550173
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 3/12/2010
  • Pages: 496
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.70 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Dr Mark Elwood is an epidemiologist and public health medicine specialist and currently Vice-President of Family and Community Oncology at the British Columbia Cancer Agency in Vancouver, Canada. His varied career has included professorial positions at the University of Nottingham, England, and the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; and being Director of the National Cancer Control Initiative in Australia. He has been extensively involved in research and programme development in cancer prevention and screening, including the development of screening programmes for breast cancer in New Zealand and for colorectal cancer in Australia and Canada. His major research has been on melanoma, as well as on other cancers and birth defects. He has committed to evidence-based health care and the use of scientific knowledge in policy development. Dr Sutcliffe graduated with honours from St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, in 1970. Following training positions at St Bartholomew's, Hammersmith (Royal Postgraduate Medical School) and Oxford in the areas of internal medicine and medical oncology, he completed his Doctoral thesis at London University. He was a staff oncologist and member of the senior scientific staff of the Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital 1982-1989, the Vice President Oncology Programs 1989-1993, Professor of Radiology, University of Toronto (1989-1996), and the President and CEO of OCI/PMH 1994-1996. Between 1996 and 2000, Dr Sutcliffe was Vice President at the BC Cancer Agency with responsibility for the Vancouver Cancer Centre, academic development in oncology with the University of British Columbia and leadership of the Provincial Tumour Groups. Dr Sutcliffe was appointed President and CEO of the BC Cancer Agency (October 2000 - March 2009).

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Table of Contents

Pt. 1 The cancer challenge

1 Cancer control and the burden of cancer Mark Elwood Elwood, Mark Simon Sutcliffe Sutcliffe, Simon

Pt. 2 Prevention and screening

2 Active cancer prevention Graham Colditz Colditz, Graham Courtney Beers Beers, Courtney

3 Achieving behavioural changes in individuals and populations David Hill Hill, David Helen Dixon Dixon, Helen

4 Early diagnosis and screening in cancer control Anthony Miller Miller, Anthony

Pt. 3 Applying new research

5 Integrating science with service in cancer control: closing the gap between discovery and delivery Jon Kerner Kerner, Jon

6 The impact of immunization on cancer control: the example of HPV vaccination Ann Burchell Burchell, Ann Eduardo Franco Franco, Eduardo

Pt. 4 Improving patient care

7 Improving cancer services: the approach taken in England Mike Richards Richards, Mike

8 Population-based cancer control and the role of guidelines - towards a 'systems' approach George P. Browman Browman, George P. Melissa Brouwers Brouwers, Melissa Beatrice Fervers Fervers, Beatrice Carol Sawka Sawka, Carol

9 The optimal provision of cancer treatment services Michael Barton Barton, Michael Geoff Delaney Delaney, Geoff

10 Managing the cost of new therapies: the challenge of funding new drugs Susan O'Reilly O'Reilly, Susan Jaya Venkatesh Venkatesh, Jaya

11 Community supports for people affected by cancer Michael Jefford Jefford, Michael

12 Improving quality of life Shirley Bush Bush, Shirley Eduardo Bruera Bruera, Eduardo

13 Shifting the paradigm: from complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to integrative oncology Anne Leis Leis, Anne Stephen Sagar Sagar, Stephen Marja VerhoefVerhoef, Marja Lynda Balneaves Balneaves, Lynda Dugald Seely Seely, Dugald Doreen Oneschuk Oneschuk, Doreen

14 Patient centred supportive and palliative care Genevieve Thompson Thompson, Genevieve Carla Ens Ens, Carla Harvey Chochinov Chochinov, Harvey

Pt. 5 Integrated cancer control

15 From cancer care to cancer control: organization of population-based cancer control systems Simon Sutcliffe Sutcliffe, Simon

16 Getting the public involved in cancer control - doing something besides worrying Patricia Kelly Kelly, Patricia William Friedman Friedman, William Tara Addis Addis, Tara Mark Elwood Elwood, Mark Claire Neil Neil, Claire Mark Sarner Sarner, Mark Simon Sutcliffe Sutcliffe, Simon

17 Organizational structures for cancer control Lorraine Caron Caron, Lorraine

18 Evaluating the outcomes of cancer control Andrea Micheli Micheli, Andrea Paolo Baili, Roberta Ciampichini Arduino Verdecchia Verdecchia, Arduino

19 Priority setting methods and cancer control Stuart Peacock Peacock, Stuart Lindsay Hedden Hedden, Lindsay Craig Mitton Mitton, Craig

20 Ethics and the idea of cancer control Lisa Schwartz Schwartz, Lisa

21 Integrating cancer control with control of other non-communicable diseases Robert Burton Burton, Robert Jerzy Leowski, Jr. Leowski, Jerzy, Jr. Maximliian de Courten de Courten, Maximliian

22 Cancer control in developing countries Ian Magrath Magrath, Ian

23 Strengthening the global community for cancer control Simon Sutcliffe Sutcliffe, Simon Mark Elwood Elwood, Mark

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