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Candida
     

Candida

4.0 1
by Bernard Shaw, Only Books (Editor)
 

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Candida, a comedy by playwright George Bernard Shaw, was written in 1894 and first published in 1898, as part of his Plays Pleasant. The central characters are clergyman James Morell, his wife Candida and a youthful poet, Eugene Marchbanks, who tries to win Candida's affections. The play questions Victorian notions of love and marriage, asking what a woman really

Overview

Candida, a comedy by playwright George Bernard Shaw, was written in 1894 and first published in 1898, as part of his Plays Pleasant. The central characters are clergyman James Morell, his wife Candida and a youthful poet, Eugene Marchbanks, who tries to win Candida's affections. The play questions Victorian notions of love and marriage, asking what a woman really desires from her husband. The cleric is a Christian Socialist, allowing Shaw-himself a Fabian Socialist-to weave political issues, current at the time, into the story.
Shaw attempted but failed to have a London production of the play put on in the 1890s, but there were two small provincial productions. However, in late 1903 actor Arnold Daly had such a great success with the play that Shaw would write by 1904 that New York was seeing "an outbreak of Candidamania". The Royal Court Theatre in London performed the play in six matinees in 1904. The same theatre staged several other of Shaw's plays from 1904 to 1907, including further revivals of Candida.
Candida presents a youthful figure whose informal moral reflections help other characters to understand their lives better. This youth is the nervous eighteen-year-old nobleman Eugene, who returns with Candida to her house and husband in London. Candida's husband is the socialist reverend Morell, a famous speaker who also runs his household in an egalitarian fashion; since there is only one maid, Morell, his wife, and his secretary assume some of the household chores. Morell seems very much in control of his world until Eugene tells him that he (Eugene) is in love with Candida and that she is probably repulsed by Morell.
Eugene's revelation and reflections undermine Morell's apparent security and control and show his fragility. An additional complication arises when Morell's despised father-in-law, the unscrupulous businessman Burgess, comes to talk to Morell for the first time in three years. Burgess is appalled at Morell's suggestion that they would get along fine if they agreed to be honest with each other. Morell should openly consider Burgess a scoundrel and Burgess should openly call Morell a fool.

Editorial Reviews

Criticas
Grade 3-5–Cándida is an 11-year-old girl from Caracas who is spending her summer vacation with her grandmother in the village of Maturín. In the three chapters of this book, readers get to know a typical middle schooler, her surprisingly mischievous Venezuelan grandmother, and the village itself, filled with interesting people. Cándida is at first embarrassed by her grandmother's countrified habits, but she soon discovers that there's logic behind her grandmother's odd behavior. The girl learns not to be overly concerned about what people think of her, not to be afraid of ghosts and things that go bump in the night, how to treat a crabby neighbor, and how to deal with her first love. Peli's illustrations are delightfully hip, showing Cándida in a midriff-baring shirt and baggy pants playing on her grandmother's patio, walking to town, and strolling through the town's main plaza. He takes pains with his pen-and-ink sketches to detail the life of the village, as well as the grandmother's shapeless flowery dresses and sparse hair. This delightful book is written in very accessible language and will appeal to reluctant readers. Especially recommended for school libraries.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
—María Otero-Boisvert, "Críticas"

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781535290616
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
09/04/2016
Pages:
42
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.09(d)

Meet the Author

call Morell a fool.
George Bernard Shaw (26 July 1856 - 2 November 1950), known at his insistence simply as Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic and polemicist whose influence on Western theatre, culture and politics extended from the 1880s to his death and beyond. He wrote more than sixty plays, including major works such as Man and Superman (1902), Pygmalion (1912) and Saint Joan (1923). With a range incorporating both contemporary satire and historical allegory, Shaw became the leading dramatist of his generation, and in 1925 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Born in Dublin, Shaw moved to London in 1876, where he struggled to establish himself as a writer and novelist, and embarked on a rigorous process of self-education. By the mid-1880s he had become a respected theatre and music critic. Following a political awakening, he joined the gradualist Fabian Society and became its most prominent pamphleteer. Shaw had been writing plays for years before his first public success, Arms and the Man in 1894. Influenced by Henrik Ibsen, he sought to introduce a new realism into English-language drama, using his plays as vehicles to disseminate his political, social and religious ideas. By the early twentieth century his reputation as a dramatist was secured with a series of critical and popular successes that included Major Barbara, The Doctor's Dilemma and Caesar and Cleopatra.
Shaw's expressed views were often contentious; he promoted eugenics and alphabet reform, and opposed vaccination and organised religion. He courted unpopularity by denouncing both sides in the First World War as equally culpable, and although not a republican, castigated British policy on Ireland in the postwar period. These stances had no lasting effect on his standing or productivity as a dramatist; the inter-war years saw a series of often ambitious plays, which achieved varying degrees of popular success. In 1938 he provided the screenplay for a filmed version of Pygmalion for which he received an Academy Award. His appetite for politics and controversy remained undiminished; by the late 1920s he had largely renounced Fabian gradualism and often wrote and spoke favourably of dictatorships of the right and left-he expressed admiration for both Mussolini and Stalin. In the final decade of his life he to write prolifically until shortly before his death, aged ninety-four, having refused all state honours including the Order of Merit in 1946.

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Candida 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago