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Candide [NOOK Book]

Overview

"Candide, in this illustrated book", who a young man, and who is living a sheltered life in an Edenic paradise and being indoctrinated with Leibnizian optimism (or simply Optimism) by his mentor, Pangloss.
The work describes the abrupt cessation of this lifestyle, followed by Candide's slow, painful disillusionment as he witnesses and experiences great hardships in the world. Voltaire concludes with Candide, if not rejecting optimism outright, advocating a deeply practical precept, "we must cultivate our ...
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Candide

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Overview

"Candide, in this illustrated book", who a young man, and who is living a sheltered life in an Edenic paradise and being indoctrinated with Leibnizian optimism (or simply Optimism) by his mentor, Pangloss.
The work describes the abrupt cessation of this lifestyle, followed by Candide's slow, painful disillusionment as he witnesses and experiences great hardships in the world. Voltaire concludes with Candide, if not rejecting optimism outright, advocating a deeply practical precept, "we must cultivate our garden", in lieu of the Leibnizian mantra of Pangloss, "all is for the best in the best of all possible worlds".

Ever since 1759, when Voltaire wrote "Candide" in ridicule of the notion that this is the best of all possible worlds, this world has been a gayer place for readers. Voltaire wrote it in three days, and five or six generations have found that its laughter does not grow old.
"Candide" has not aged. Yet how different the book would have looked if Voltaire had written it a hundred and fifty years later than 1759. It would have been, among other things, a book of sights and sounds. A modern writer would have tried to catch and fix in words some of those Atlantic changes which broke the Atlantic monotony of that voyage from Cadiz to Buenos Ayres. When Martin and Candide were sailing the length of the Mediterranean we should have had a contrast between naked scarped Balearic cliffs and headlands of Calabria in their mists. We should have had quarter distances, far horizons, the altering silhouettes of an Ionian island. Colored birds would have filled Paraguay with their silver or acid cries.
Dr. Pangloss, to prove the existence of design in the universe, says that noses were made to carry spectacles, and so we have spectacles. A modern satirist would not try to paint with Voltaire's quick brush the doctrine that he wanted to expose. And he would choose a more complicated doctrine than Dr. Pangloss's optimism, would study it more closely, feel his destructive way about it with a more learned and caressing malice. His attack, stealthier, more flexible and more patient than Voltaire's, would call upon us, especially when his learning got a little out of control, to be more than patient. Now and then he would bore us. "Candide" never bored anybody except William Wordsworth.
Voltaire's men and women point his case against optimism by starting high and falling low. A modern could not go about it after this fashion. He would not plunge his people into an unfamiliar misery. He would just keep them in the misery they were born to.

Illustrated & Published by e-Kitap Projesi, Copyright..
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940149296538
  • Publisher: e-Kitap Projesi
  • Publication date: 5/21/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 250 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(98)

4 Star

(83)

3 Star

(45)

2 Star

(14)

1 Star

(10)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 253 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2010

    Brilliant Story, Horrible Translation

    Candide was a beautiful story, filled with humor, love, and lots of humor. I think the story is still stimulating even after hundreds of years!

    I recently read this for my Classics Book Club and we all took turns reading various passages from our varying translations of the book, which is something we tend to do each month. My only complaint about the story is this: the Morley translation (of the B&N Classics version) was AWFUL!

    All of the beautiful, poetic passages that the others in my group read aloud were translated as drivel in my copy (the only one with the B&N version of this book in our group). It seemed as if Mr. Morley literally translated the French to English (such as "the horse brown" instead of "the brown horse") and thus, lost much of the wonderful wordsmithing of Voltaire. I almost cried when it was my turn to read the opening passage because I knew the B&N version was horrible!

    Aside from the horrible translation, I would recommend this story to anyone. I wouldn't however, recommend THIS translation of the story. Sorry B&N...

    14 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2010

    Brilliant story, terrible translation

    Candide as a story is worth reading in any language, although it is much funnier and much more enjoyable in original French. However, the reason for that may just be that this is a very poor translation. The language is more archaic than in the original, and many subtleties are lost through poor word choice (for example, in this version Martin "hopes" that all is for the best, while in the original he pessimistically "wishes" that everything was indeed AT ITS BEST). Nevertheless, Candide is a witty and brilliant story that can be enjoyed for philosophical enlightenment or simply for a rainy day. I would recommend, though, that if you're going to read it in English, get a different edition. Normally B&N Classics are nice, quality editions, but this is sadly an exception.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 5, 2009

    An excellent Read

    This book is definately one of the best things I've read in a while. The humor is great, and the characters all seem to fit in a way that makes the story an interesting one.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2004

    Simple Read

    I wasn't as taken with this book as many of the reviewers here, but found the book worth reading and interesting since I haven't ever read somethign from this time by a man.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 29, 2014

    Candide by Voltaire is a tale that leaves the reader questioning

    Candide by Voltaire is a tale that leaves the reader questioning his or her own hardships, experiences, and views of the world. The philosophical aspect of the book teaches the reader of many different views of people based on their experiences. For example the Character of the old woman in the book serves to represent a pessimistic and hopeless view of the world. The old lady lives her life thinking of what should have been and lives her life in the present in a depressed state. Candide, however had suffered many hardships throughout his life too, always tried to keep a positive mind set and never gave up on the hope for a better life. 
    The book also leaves the reader questioning the issues of morality and human nature. The injustices showed in the book such as rape and murder were recurring throughout the story. These terrible acts done by other people to the main characters in the book shows that human nature is cruel and unforgiving.
    Voltaire makes it so Candide never gets what he had been so desperately searching for through the course of the whole story in the end to make a point that in the real world, most of the time people do not end up getting what they want and they usually end up having to settle for less that their ideal “happy ending.”
    Candide is a very realistic and blunt representation of hardship and the overall human experience. The moral of the story is that all a person can do in life is attempt to stay positive and to keep moving forward when faced with hardship. This story provides many aspects and ways that people deal with life when faced with suffering and turmoil. The book serves as an accurate representation of human emotion and coping methods in the real world.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Somewhat funny

    This book is said to be funny, I found it amusing. I think some people may not understand or be able to stick with Voltaire.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2006

    Good book but BIG mistake at the end

    When you are reading the end of the book, there is a list of kings that died horrible deaths. This book says Henry IV of England was one of those kings. Henry IV died of natural causes. Perhaps it was meant to be Henry VI and it is a typo. I'd be interested to see the original Voltaire and what he wrote.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2005

    A beautiful slap to the face

    I loved Candide for its blatent criticism of Leibniz, bleeding with sarcasm and disgust from every page. It is just so cool (for the lack of a better term) that Voltaire wrote a novel just to trash an opposing viewpoint. This book actually made me laugh while reading about the inquisition.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2014

    Robbin crawford rhea

    Robbin as crawford abcdefghijklmnopqrst
    Uvwxyz zyxwvwtsrqponmlkjihgfedcba

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2013

    Very Witty

    Voltaire's Candide offers a very witty and comical satire on society. The novel is very funny and is worth the read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2013

    This book is good, but definately not for young readers. My 13 y

    This book is good, but definately not for young readers. My 13 yr old son was given this for his honors english class for the summer. Do Not let you child read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2013

    Love this book!

    If you haven't read this book, pick it up. It's a great story and a timeless classic.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2012

    Silly, Ridiculous, and Alarming

    I had not known much about Voltaire before reading this book. I only knew that he was a figure in enlightenment thinking and Samuel Johnson threw a hissy fit when you mentioned him. The short biography in this B&N version was informative. Candide is kind of an autobiographical satire on the philosophy of Leibniz. No one, from clergy to kings is spared in the lampooning. I was entertained and I learned about philosophy in the process.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2012

    Beautifully written!

    Voltaire is unrelenting in his critique and attack of deterministic optimism and Leibnz cosmology. Each character and each event that transpires only exists to lambast this philosophy. Even better, the final pages leave one wrestling with yourself whether optimism or pessimism is the best philosophy to live life, or questioning the power of pragmatic philosophy. Voltaire perfectly captures problems of theodicy as well as the existence of life itself--both the beauty of existence and the idleness of life.

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  • Posted December 30, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Beautifully disparaging

    Candid is utterly tragic, and yet magnificent humor is so cleverly entwined. I found myself laughing throughout the novel. It is profound and beautifully disparaging, and I will read this over again and again.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2011

    Highly recomended

    Loved it! It even had illustrations that showed nicely on my nook.

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  • Posted September 6, 2010

    Relevant and entertaining adventure-comedy-commentary.

    This is a title that I'd often heard mentioned, but never really picked up anything regarding its subject or author. I'd heard Voltaire mentioned by teachers and in various conversation, but never really looked into his writings. So, when Candide popped up in one of the Barnes & Noble free eBook offerings, I was quite happy to read it and learn a bit about the author. After reading a bit about Voltaire on Wikipedia, I had a good idea of what to expect in reading this book. Overall, it fits the bill of being a satire of religious dogma and Leibniz's optimistic philosophy. This is an aspect that I can appreciate, especially given a lot of the things going on in the world today. Poking at those who rely solely upon tenets and beliefs without actually acting to make anything happen is always welcome. This sort of laziness and reliance solely on mystical magical supreme powers has always made me twitch. Voltaire does create a very fast-paced mock-adventure story that at times is difficult to follow. The fantastical and often unreal situations in which the characters find themselves, coupled with the pace of the story, is as disorienting as it is engaging. I found myself having to slow down reading the book at times as I would get lost in the whirlwind of events. The caricatures Voltaire describes do well to compile all of the disturbing characteristics of the zealots encountered during his time and that we find even today. I can see why the book was banned at the time. It's not often that governments or religious groups can handle being mocked or shown less respect than they deem that they deserve. When those governments or religious groups have been granted or have assumed adequate power over the people, they tend to suppress all that they feel detracts from their stature or power. Fortunately, there are authors from the past and in our current day that will use various literary vehicles to express themselves thereby exposing their views to the public. While we are in no way obliged to accept their views completely, having the opportunity to asses their merit for ourselves is something we should embrace. Candide is short, but dense with detail. Read it with an open mind and abstract what's on the page to what is "out there" in our day and you will see how relevant Voltaire's commentary is today.

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  • Posted June 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    "Work keeps at bay three great evils: boredom, vice, and need."

    I loved Candide and could not put it down. It's true, there's nothing especially ground-breaking in this little tale. However, it's still a nice read, thought-provoking in so many ways, and the satire can be ridiculously hilarious at times.

    If you want to read it, go for it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2009

    Candide, my son.

    A great classic of satirical literature, to be ranked with Tristram Shandy and Catch 22. If you haven't read it, you must, in order to put it into your stockpile of greatness. If you haven't read it for a long time, it will reward your renewed interest. The persevering Candide, the badly used lovely Cunegonde, the preacher of totally undeserving optimism, Professor Pangloss. And that final garden, that final garden.

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  • Posted November 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Absurdly Redundant Satire

    Candide equals satire. Most regrettably, this was satire in its base form--unrealistic misfortunes piled one on top of the other. The pile was so high and glaringly fake in composition that it became almost a chore to read. Put bluntly, the satire in Candide was even more pathetic than my previous analogy.

    The moral of Voltaire's dissatisfying work was short and to the point--making common sense to any reader. However, there seems to be no logical reason in finishing the book once one makes it past the third or fourth chapter, as it simply repeats egregious calamities endured by various characters.

    The conclusion I came to was that Voltaire's Candide is only to be -skimmed- if ALL other classics have been thoroughly perused; or, if one is intently set on having their intelligence flogged more often than Candide himself. Candide: a repetitive misery of a satire.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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