Candy Construction: How to Build Race Cars, Castles, and Other Cool Stuff out of Store-Bought Candy

Candy Construction: How to Build Race Cars, Castles, and Other Cool Stuff out of Store-Bought Candy

2.5 2
by Sharon Bowers
     
 

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Build a candy fantasy! Use ordinary store-bought candy and cookies as the raw material for a brand-new kind of crafting, where castles are made with wafer-cookie walls and race cars have Oreos for wheels. Sharon Bowers provides step-by-step instructions for dozens of whimsical and fun projects that will have you seeing candy in a whole new way. From licorice

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Overview

Build a candy fantasy! Use ordinary store-bought candy and cookies as the raw material for a brand-new kind of crafting, where castles are made with wafer-cookie walls and race cars have Oreos for wheels. Sharon Bowers provides step-by-step instructions for dozens of whimsical and fun projects that will have you seeing candy in a whole new way. From licorice pirates and centipedes made from Life Savers to marshmallow aliens and candy bento boxes, the sweet possibilities are endless. 

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
...plenty of fabulous ideas using all kinds of colorful sweet treats.
Real Simple blog
...plenty of fabulous ideas using all kinds of colorful sweet treats.
Children's Literature - Leigh Geiger
Don't play with your food! That parental mantra is turned upside down here as Bowers encourages kids to create a variety of fun and engaging crafts using widely available and inexpensive candy pieces. Bowers suggests that, in her experience, children aren't as interested in eating candy when they see it as their own creation. In fact, she clearly spells out three rules which emphasize limited candy consumption and taking care of your teeth. The crafts are all presented using a construction theme with the kids as builders and an adult as the "senior foreman." Recipes for the basic bricks (bar cookies) and mortar (icing) used as the basis for all of the crafts are introduced first. Then Bowers presents dozens of imaginative constructions from trucks and trains to games such as checkers and chess as well as jewelry and animals. There's sure to be something here to interest almost any kid. Each recipe includes a list of materials, clear instructions and a full-color photograph of the finished product. Crafts are grouped in categories such as games, transportation and holidays. Once the "bricks and mortar" have been made, there is very little cooking involved, however, this isn't a "do-it-yourself" book; adult preparation is needed before any of the crafts can be started and adult supervision will be needed for all of the cutting activities. It is an excellent way to encourage adult-child interaction and would be useful for parties and in the classroom. Several crafts, including transportation and holiday creations, are compatible with elementary school curriculum. Older children, who can read the text, will find a confusing mix of adult-directed advice on not pressing for perfection and child-centered terms like "things that go v'room." Reviewer: Leigh Geiger, Ph.D.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781603425483
Publisher:
Storey Books
Publication date:
10/01/2010
Pages:
144
Sales rank:
840,632
Product dimensions:
7.06(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.44(d)

Meet the Author

Sharon Bowers contributes to iVillage and Parents magazine, and is the author of Ghoulish Goodies, Candy Construction, and The Idiot’s Guide to Cooking Chicken.


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Candy Construction: How to Build Race Cars, Castles, and Other Cool Stuff out of Store-Bought Candy 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sux
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have not made anything yet but there are some really cute and great ideas. I am excited to make something...probably the train because it caught my children's eyes. Probably in a few years when my children are older, I am hoping it will be a fun activity for us to do together.