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Canoeing and Kayaking Guide to the Ozarks
     

Canoeing and Kayaking Guide to the Ozarks

4.5 2
by Tom Kennon
 

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In the heartland of America rise the Ozark Mountains, teeming with cascading, free-flowing streams. Situated astride the Missouri/Arkansas border, the Ozarks represent a canoeing and kayaking wonderland. Still a comprehensive, accurate and readable guide, but now with a new design and format, A Canoeing & Kayaking Guide to the Ozarks (formerly Ozark Whitewater)

Overview

In the heartland of America rise the Ozark Mountains, teeming with cascading, free-flowing streams. Situated astride the Missouri/Arkansas border, the Ozarks represent a canoeing and kayaking wonderland. Still a comprehensive, accurate and readable guide, but now with a new design and format, A Canoeing & Kayaking Guide to the Ozarks (formerly Ozark Whitewater) catalogs the varied rivers of the region. Inside are updated descriptions of all the classic rivers, including the Buffalo National and Little Missouri, as well as exciting new reports of today’s steep creek runs: Bryant, Turkey, and many others. This guide is the definitive sourcebook for Ozark river sport.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780897325219
Publisher:
Menasha Ridge Press
Publication date:
05/01/2004
Series:
Canoe and Kayak Series
Edition description:
Third Edition
Pages:
239
Sales rank:
632,364
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x (d)

Read an Excerpt

A Canoeing and Kayaking Guide to the Ozarks


By Kennon, Tom

Menasha Ridge Press

Copyright © 2004 Kennon, Tom
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0897325214

West Cedar Creek drops at a rate of 40 feet per mile in this section and continuous class II and III rapids can characterize it. The paddler is greeted with a good class II drop at the put in. The Creek is constricted on both sides by bedrock, creating a fast flow with good eddies and surfing opportunities. Another good drop is just below the Highway 162 Bridge followed by a rapid that drops through a tight boulder field that requires precision moves at just the right moment. The rapid can be run on the river right or river left chutes. The left chute is more difficult and drops into a hole that can be a boat eater at higher levels. The right chute requires an approach from middle river left to river right in preparation for a quick left then right maneuver to run this rapid successfully. Class II rapids continue non-stop for approximately one quarter mile and then the paddler encounters a class II+ slide ledge that takes the paddler under a large rock shelf with no danger. It is just spectacular! Note the waterfall on the right side of the creek! The creek swings to the left (east) and drops over a four-foot waterfall that should be run on river left. There are several good surfing holes here. The paddler encounters a low water bridge less that a quarter mile from the falls. Pull out on river left and portage to avoid the culverts in the bridge. This is alternate Put-in for this section that can be used to shorten the trip by approximately one mile. The creek continues with sporty class II rapids for a short distance then East Cedar Creek enters on river left as the paddler passes under the old wagon bridge. Just below the confluence of East Cedar Creek the paddler encounters a class II+ run that is very exciting. Not far downstream the creek splits. Take the left channel and prepare for a very tight fast run. One should always be on the lookout for fallen trees! Just downstream, the confluence of Cedar Creek enters on right, as the creek turns left. Eddy out and surf the waves here! Just downstream is a low water ford. River left is the safe route. Hydraulics form from the middle to river right of the low water ford. The creek slows its drop for the next two miles but the current still moves and very little paddling is required.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from A Canoeing and Kayaking Guide to the Ozarks by Kennon, Tom Copyright © 2004 by Kennon, Tom. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Tom Kennon began paddling in 1974 and wrote his first book in 1978, Arkansas Whitewater Rivers, after gathering information about rivers in Arkansas due to the lack of information about paddling in the area. In 1988 Ozark Whitewater expanded the original book to a more comprehensive description of rivers in the Ozarks. He lives in Fort Smith, Arkansas and is still an active paddler and ACA canoe instructor closely associated with the Arkansas Canoe Club.

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4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book gives just the right amount of accurate information on several streams & rivers, from someone who has personally traveled them. It also gives several websites for up-to-date info on stream level, ect.