×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Canvas Falcons
     

Canvas Falcons

2.0 1
by Steven Longstreet
 
Based on documents written by the great aces and interviews with survivors, this story of the air war in Europe re-creates a world where men too young to have known much of life discovered new ways of killing and dying. Here are the true stories of the famous flyers on both sides of the conflict: Manfred von Richthofen—"The Red Baron"—who shot down 80

Overview

Based on documents written by the great aces and interviews with survivors, this story of the air war in Europe re-creates a world where men too young to have known much of life discovered new ways of killing and dying. Here are the true stories of the famous flyers on both sides of the conflict: Manfred von Richthofen—"The Red Baron"—who shot down 80 enemy planes; Max Immelmann, who extended the combat capabilities of the aircraft with his innovative aerial maneuvers; one-eyed British ace Mick Mannock who brought down 73 German planes; and America's own Eddie Rickenbacker, whose 26 kills came in little more than a year of actual combat. Examining the technological aspects of combat aviation, the development and use of weapons such as the zeppelin and the machine gun, and the incredible teamwork of famous fighter squadrons, Longstreet captures both the romance and the horror of combat above the Western Front.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781566196697
Publisher:
Sterling Publishing
Publication date:
04/15/1995
Pages:
365

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Canvas Falcons 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book is reasonably well-written and presents interesting information about the fliers of the Great War. Although there are some inaccuracies and errors, it does provide enough detail and 'bits' to give the reader a closer look at the men and conflict during that era. One main drawback to the text is the author's continuous interjections and obvious personal opinions. It tends to detract from the 'historical' quality of the information presented. Also, I find it sligthtly disconcerting that the book is obviously slanted in favour of the Allied fliers and their personalities. As a 'historical' text, it should be as objective as possible. Both sides faced countless horrors and both sides had personalities of all calibres. In all, the book is worth reading to get a feel for the air war and the major characters, but it is far from being one of the best.