Capability Cases: A Solutions Envisioning Approach

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $6.10
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 88%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (15) from $6.10   
  • New (6) from $44.25   
  • Used (9) from $6.10   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$44.25
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(17705)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New, Perfect Condition, Please allow 4-14 business days for delivery. 100% Money Back Guarantee, Over 1,000,000 customers served.

Ships from: Westminster, MD

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$44.26
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(23484)

Condition: New
BRAND NEW

Ships from: Avenel, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$46.24
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(0)

Condition: New
0321205766 Premium Publisher Direct Books are Like New or Brand New books direct from the publisher sometimes at a discount. Multiple copies are usually available. These books ... are not available for expedited shipping and may take up to 14 business days to receive. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Woodland Hills, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Express, 48 States
$48.55
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(31)

Condition: New
PAPERBACK New 0321205766 Premium Publisher Direct Books are Like New or Brand New books direct from the publisher sometimes at a discount. Multiple copies are usually ... available. These books are not available for expedited shipping and may take up to 14 business days to receive. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Tarzana, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$72.16
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(4)

Condition: New
New

Ships from: Idyllwild, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$76.96
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(8)

Condition: New
7-26-05 other 1 BRAND NEW! ONLY Expedited orders are shipped with tracking number! *WE DO NOT SHIP TO PO BOX* Please allow up to 14 days delivery for order with standard ... shipping. SHIPPED FROM MULTIPLE LOCATIONS. Read more Show Less

Ships from: San Jose, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

"In this innovative book, Irene Polikoff, Robert Coyne, and Ralph Hodgson have captured deep insights from many years of studying how to get across the 'Business-IT Gap.' Capability Cases are an invaluable tool for bridging from envisioning to design."

—Steve Cook, software architect, Microsoft Corporation

"Capability Cases offers hope that mere mortals can rise above the daunting challenge of blending technology and process. Executives hoping to adopt high-performing business models will want to learn this step-by-step approach to designing and implementing IT-enabled organizational change."

—Dr. Jeanne W. Ross, principal research scientist, MIT Center for Information

BRIDGE THE GAP BETWEEN BUSINESS VISION AND SOFTWARE SOLUTION

Both IT organizations and business leaders recognize the urgent importance of aligning technology solutions with enterprise strategy. But they've struggled to do so... until now. Capability Cases represents a breakthrough: a powerful, systematic way to translate business vision into effective plans and system designs.

The authors' Solution Envisioning methodology addresses the crucial "front end" of software development, where you decide what to build and how you're going to build it. Using realistic examples, they walk you through exploring the capabilities you need, capturing business best practices, identifying optimal solutions, and crafting software systems that deliver them.

Solution Envisioning enables you to specify better solutions in less time, build systems that more fully reflect your true needs, and dramatically reduce risk and cost throughout the entire development process. Understand Solution Envisioning—from vision to plan—in three phases:

  • Use Business Capability Exploration (BCE) to build a shared understanding of what is needed in a solution—model your business situation using business forces, desired results, metrics, and scenarios
  • Run Solution Capability Envisioning (SCE) workshops to facilitate decision-making, collaborative assessment, and consolidation of a solution concept—use Capability Case Galleries to discover alternatives, gain context, promote stakeholder interaction, and stimulate creativity
  • Move from concept to business case to a roadmap for realization with Software Capability Design (SCD)

Includes easy-to-use "best of class" templates for developing a business case, concept of operations, architectural decisions, and other key work products.

Whether you're an executive, architect, project manager, developer, change agent, or consultant, Capability Cases will help you bridge the gap between vision and solution—so you can finally get what you need from information technology.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321205766
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 7/5/2005
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 504
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Capability Cases: A Solution Envisioning ApproachAbout the Authors

Irene Polikoff, partner and co-founder of TopQuadrant, Inc., has more than 15 years of IT experience. Her specialties include technology strategy, IT management, system integration, process reengineering, systems assessment, and technology selection.

Dr. Robert Coyne, executive partner at TopQuadrant, has more than 20 years of experience in the full lifecycle of business development, product design, software development, production, and delivery. He brings integrated knowledge and expertise from business, consulting, academia, and research to solution development processes, methods, and practice.

Ralph Hodgson, partner and co-founder of TopQuadrant, has been a thought leader in the IT industry for some 25 years. He has expertise in enterprise systems design, software engineering, IT consulting, object and ontology modeling, Semantic Technology, logic programming, and methodology development.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Capability Cases: A Solution Envisioning ApproachCapability Cases: A Solution Envisioning ApproachPreface

Capability.1 It's a promising word. It sounds, well, capable, and it alludes to the delivery of something. We all use capabilities every day in the goods and services by which we construct our lives. We like to be capable; we respect and value capabilities in others. As individuals, we carefully evaluate and compare the capabilities in the products and services we purchase—in everything from cars and houses to palm pilots, digital cameras, and mobile phone services. We look for and expect capabilities in companies we choose to deal with and in the companies we own or choose to be a part of.

As businesses, we also need to purchase or build, deploy and use, offer or consume capabilities all the time—regularly and continuously. It is requisite that we absorb, embrace, employ, and evolve new capabilities—with ever greater speed and agility—simply to remain effective and cost competitive. But, knowing about and successfully deploying the right new capabilities has always been challenging to businesses. In particular, software and technology capabilities are sometimes as elusive, amorphous, and difficult to pin down as they are valuable and essential to the core operations and processes of most modern businesses and organizations.

Most business capabilities today are a combination of human capital, fixed assets (such as facilities), processes, and technology. Forging successful combinations requires proficient orchestration of the interplay between business and technology. In this era of technology explosion (ranging from Web Services to new Platforms for Collaboration and Personalization to Semantic Technologies and Agents), the possibilities are as truly mind- boggling as the challenges of effective action. In nearly every industry and business area, technology capabilities are playing an ever more prominent role—and some business capabilities are becoming identical with technology capabilities.

We are entering a world where the network is the platform and a large amount of business-enabling capabilities will be made possible by assembling commodity software that implements standardized protocols. Indeed, technologies are creating deeper changes in businesses—invoking a disruptive new order that challenges all the rules of business. Business capabilities made possible by technology demolish traditional barriers of geography, law, organization, and time while simultaneously raising new bars for success in terms of connectedness, convenience, quality, and performance.2

For instance, capabilities introduced by technology have changed user expectations. Business has become more personal, and customers have (much) more control. Businesses have rapidly become more connected and accessible, and in many cases instantly available all the time. As a result, business has paradoxically become both simpler and more complex. Technologies can simplify transactions, but they also engender more complex transactions and more sophisticated use of data and knowledge. New capabilities create challenges to business models by regularly shifting the value proposition. Many things that were previously sold are given away for free. Business value, to be earned by truly serving customers, has shifted to somewhere else in the value chain.

How hard it is to identify, design, and deploy the right capabilities? Capability, per se, doesn't usually conjure up any nuances or overtones of failure (yet). But, as we all know, as soon as we attempt to acquire and make use of capabilities, there is suddenly a pressing demand for a blend of vision, planning, and know-how to take advantage of and make capabilities actual or realized through their successful application. Further complicating the situation, there is an increasing multiplicity of sources from which to realize (develop, acquire, compose) capabilities. Geoffrey Moore, industry consultant and best-selling author, puts it this way:3

"With service-oriented architecture, integration, composition of applications, open source software, vendor consolidation and the tension between building, buying and outsourcing software solutions—companies are under pressure to change too much and too fast. Risks seem unavoidable. There is not enough budget or time to cover all the bases. The leading enterprises will identify the core of their business and invest in safety and agility of the IT behind this core—first."

Unless we have knowledge of capabilities, the vision to know their worth, and the experience and discipline to apply them, we may get lost somewhere in a "sea of potentials." In our personal lives, in assessing where true capabilities are found, whether they are real, sound, and worth having, we typically use many sources of information, processes, and tools for evaluation—facilities such as Consumer Reports4 for consumer products or recommendations from friends or people who have experience with the capability. This book is an attempt to aid individuals and companies in improving technology-enabled business capabilities by responding to their needs for

  • Understanding what capabilities exist—what is out there
  • Facilitating the interplay between business and technical ideas
  • Understanding the significance and implications of capabilities and the constraints and costs of employing them
  • Establishing effective processes for acquiring, adopting, and -applying capabilities

We introduce the Solution Envisioning process to help people envision together the needs and possibilities of business. The process is supported by the Capability Case, an aid to understanding and evaluating capabilities. In the everyday sense of the words, the Capability Case is intended to build a case for a capability by illustrating its potential and value. We offer Solution Envisioning with Capability Cases (the approach this book introduces) as a start toward a new kind of essential, comprehensive approach for appreciating and making intelligent decisions about the available technology capabilities that will be powering businesses for some time to come.

1 The quality of being capable; capacity or ability needed to do something. (plural) Qualities that may be used or developed; potentialities.

2 We are indebted to Peter Stecher of IBM, EMEA, for insights into this characterization of the revolutionary nature of new technologies in terms of the deeper changes they bring to doing business.

3 From Gartner Application Integration & Web Services Summit 2005 brochure, highlighting Moore's keynote talk, "The Key to Sustained Leadership: Separating the Core from the Context," where he "shares his latest insights into the software industry challenges and opportunities."

4 A source that has its own 'capabilities'—a trusted source of information, knowledge, evaluative mechanisms, and the experience to make useful judgments about the relative promise and value of other capabilities.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Technology innovation and the changing business landscape 17
Ch. 2 Bridging the gap with solution envisioning 41
Ch. 3 Illustrative applications and galleries 83
Ch. 4 Positioning within the solution delivery cycle 141
Ch. 5 Business capability exploration - phase I of solution envisioning 155
Ch. 6 Solution capability envisioning - phase II of solution envisioning 203
Ch. 7 Software capability design - phase III of solution envisioning 249
Ch. 8 Solution envisioning in different situations 301
Ch. 9 Conclusion - lessons learned and looking ahead with envisioning 347
Read More Show Less

Preface

Capability Cases: A Solution Envisioning Approach

Preface

Capability.1 It's a promising word. It sounds, well, capable, and it alludes to the delivery of something. We all use capabilities every day in the goods and services by which we construct our lives. We like to be capable; we respect and value capabilities in others. As individuals, we carefully evaluate and compare the capabilities in the products and services we purchase—in everything from cars and houses to palm pilots, digital cameras, and mobile phone services. We look for and expect capabilities in companies we choose to deal with and in the companies we own or choose to be a part of.

As businesses, we also need to purchase or build, deploy and use, offer or consume capabilities all the time—regularly and continuously. It is requisite that we absorb, embrace, employ, and evolve new capabilities—with ever greater speed and agility—simply to remain effective and cost competitive. But, knowing about and successfully deploying the right new capabilities has always been challenging to businesses. In particular, software and technology capabilities are sometimes as elusive, amorphous, and difficult to pin down as they are valuable and essential to the core operations and processes of most modern businesses and organizations.

Most business capabilities today are a combination of human capital, fixed assets (such as facilities), processes, and technology. Forging successful combinations requires proficient orchestration of the interplay between business and technology. In this era of technology explosion (ranging from Web Services to new Platforms for Collaboration and Personalization to Semantic Technologies and Agents), the possibilities are as truly mind- boggling as the challenges of effective action. In nearly every industry and business area, technology capabilities are playing an ever more prominent role—and some business capabilities are becoming identical with technology capabilities.

We are entering a world where the network is the platform and a large amount of business-enabling capabilities will be made possible by assembling commodity software that implements standardized protocols. Indeed, technologies are creating deeper changes in businesses—invoking a disruptive new order that challenges all the rules of business. Business capabilities made possible by technology demolish traditional barriers of geography, law, organization, and time while simultaneously raising new bars for success in terms of connectedness, convenience, quality, and performance.2

For instance, capabilities introduced by technology have changed user expectations. Business has become more personal, and customers have (much) more control. Businesses have rapidly become more connected and accessible, and in many cases instantly available all the time. As a result, business has paradoxically become both simpler and more complex. Technologies can simplify transactions, but they also engender more complex transactions and more sophisticated use of data and knowledge. New capabilities create challenges to business models by regularly shifting the value proposition. Many things that were previously sold are given away for free. Business value, to be earned by truly serving customers, has shifted to somewhere else in the value chain.

How hard it is to identify, design, and deploy the right capabilities? Capability, per se, doesn't usually conjure up any nuances or overtones of failure (yet). But, as we all know, as soon as we attempt to acquire and make use of capabilities, there is suddenly a pressing demand for a blend of vision, planning, and know-how to take advantage of and make capabilities actual or realized through their successful application. Further complicating the situation, there is an increasing multiplicity of sources from which to realize (develop, acquire, compose) capabilities. Geoffrey Moore, industry consultant and best-selling author, puts it this way:3

"With service-oriented architecture, integration, composition of applications, open source software, vendor consolidation and the tension between building, buying and outsourcing software solutions—companies are under pressure to change too much and too fast. Risks seem unavoidable. There is not enough budget or time to cover all the bases. The leading enterprises will identify the core of their business and invest in safety and agility of the IT behind this core—first."

Unless we have knowledge of capabilities, the vision to know their worth, and the experience and discipline to apply them, we may get lost somewhere in a "sea of potentials." In our personal lives, in assessing where true capabilities are found, whether they are real, sound, and worth having, we typically use many sources of information, processes, and tools for evaluation—facilities such as Consumer Reports4 for consumer products or recommendations from friends or people who have experience with the capability. This book is an attempt to aid individuals and companies in improving technology-enabled business capabilities by responding to their needs for

  • Understanding what capabilities exist—what is out there
  • Facilitating the interplay between business and technical ideas
  • Understanding the significance and implications of capabilities and the constraints and costs of employing them
  • Establishing effective processes for acquiring, adopting, and -applying capabilities

We introduce the Solution Envisioning process to help people envision together the needs and possibilities of business. The process is supported by the Capability Case, an aid to understanding and evaluating capabilities. In the everyday sense of the words, the Capability Case is intended to build a case for a capability by illustrating its potential and value. We offer Solution Envisioning with Capability Cases (the approach this book introduces) as a start toward a new kind of essential, comprehensive approach for appreciating and making intelligent decisions about the available technology capabilities that will be powering businesses for some time to come.

1 The quality of being capable; capacity or ability needed to do something. (plural) Qualities that may be used or developed; potentialities.

2 We are indebted to Peter Stecher of IBM, EMEA, for insights into this characterization of the revolutionary nature of new technologies in terms of the deeper changes they bring to doing business.

3 From Gartner Application Integration & Web Services Summit 2005 brochure, highlighting Moore's keynote talk, "The Key to Sustained Leadership: Separating the Core from the Context," where he "shares his latest insights into the software industry challenges and opportunities."

4 A source that has its own 'capabilities'—a trusted source of information, knowledge, evaluative mechanisms, and the experience to make useful judgments about the relative promise and value of other capabilities.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Preface

Capability.1 It's a promising word. It sounds – well--capable, and it alludes to the delivery of something. We all use capabilities everyday in the goods and services by which we construct our lives. We like to be capable, we respect and value capabilities in others. As individuals, we carefully evaluate and compare the capabilities in the products and services we purchase –in everything from cars and houses to palm pilots, digital cameras and mobile phone services. We look for and expect capabilities in companies we choose to deal with and in the companies we own or choose to be a part of.

As businesses, we also need to purchase or build, deploy and use, offer or consume capabilities all the time – regularly and continuously. It is requisite that we absorb, embrace, employ and evolve new capabilities – with ever greater speed and agility -- simply to remain effective and cost competitive. But, knowing about and successfully deploying the right, new capabilities has always been challenging to businesses. In particular, software and technology capabilities are sometimes as elusive, amorphous and difficult to pin down as they are valuable and essential to the core operations and processes of most modern businesses and organizations.

Most business capabilities today are a combination of human capital, fixed assets (such as facilities), processes and technology. Forging successful combinations requires proficient orchestration of the interplay between business and technology. In this era of technology explosion (ranging from the Web Services to new Platforms forCollaboration and Personalization to Semantic Technologies and Agents), the possibilities are as truly mind-boggling as are the challenges of effective action. In nearly every industry and business area, technology capabilities are playing an ever more prominent role – and some business capabilities are becoming identical with technology capabilities.

We are entering a world where the network is the platform and a large amount of business enabling capabilities will be made possible by assembling commodity software that implements standardized protocols. Indeed, technologies are creating deeper changes in businesses – invoking a disruptive, new order that challenges all the rules of business. Business capabilities, made possible by technology, demolish traditional barriers of geography, law, organization and time while simultaneously raising new bars for success in terms of connectedness, convenience, quality and performance.2

For instance, capabilities that technology has introduced have changed user expectations. Business has become more personal, and customers have (much) more control. Businesses have rapidly become more connected and accessible, and in many cases, instantly available, all the time. As a result, business has paradoxically become both simpler and more complex. Technologies can simplify transactions, but also engender more complex transactions and more sophisticated use of data and knowledge. New capabilities create challenges to business models by regularly shifting the value proposition. Many things that were previously sold are given away for free. Business value, to be earned by truly serving customers, has shifted to somewhere else in the value chain.

How hard it is to identify and design and deploy the right capabilities? Capability per se, doesn't usually conjure up any nuances or overtones of failure (yet). But, as we all know, as soon as we attempt to acquire and make use of capabilities, there is suddenly a pressing demand for a blend of vision, planning and know-how in order to take advantage of and make capabilities actual or realized through their successful application. Further complicating the situation, there is an increasing multiplicity of sources from which to realize (develop, acquire, compose) capabilities. Geoffrey Moore, Industry Consultant and Best-Selling Author, puts it this way:3

"With service-oriented architecture, integration, composition of applications, open source software, vendor consolidation and the tension between building, buying and outsourcing software solutions -- companies are under pressure to change too much and too fast. Risks seem unavoidable. There is not enough budget or time to cover all the bases. The leading enterprises will identify the core of their business and invest in safety and agility of the IT behind this core –first."

Unless we have knowledge of capabilities, the vision to know their worth, and the experience and discipline to apply them, we may get lost somewhere in a "sea of potentialities". In our personal lives, in assessing where true capabilities are to be found, whether they are real, sound and worth having, we typically use many sources of information, processes and tools for evaluation – facilities such as Consumer Reports4 for consumer products or recommendations from friends or those who have experience with the capability. This book is an attempt to aid individuals and companies in improving technology enabled business capabilities by responding to their needs for:

  • Understanding what capabilities exist –what is out there

  • Facilitating the interplay between business and technical ideas

  • Understanding the significance and implications of capabilities and the constraints and costs of employing them

  • Establishing effective processes for acquiring, adopting and applying capabilities

We introduce the Solution Envisioning process to help people envision together the needs and possibilities of business. The process is supported by the Capability Case, an aid to understanding and evaluating capabilities. In the everyday sense of the words, the Capability Case is intended to build a case for a capability by illustrating its potential and value. We offer Solution Envisioning with Capability Cases as a start toward a new kind of essential, comprehensive approach for appreciating and making intelligent decisions about the available technology capabilities that will be powering business for some time to come.


1 The quality of being capable; capacity or ability needed to do something. (plural) Qualities that may be used or developed; potentialities.

2 We are indebted to Peter Stecher of IBM, EMEA, for insights into this characterization of the revolutionary nature of new technologies in terms of the deeper changes they bring to doing business.

3 From Gartner Application Integration & Web Services Summit 2005 brochure, highlighting Moore's keynote talk "The Key to Sustained Leadership: Separating the Core from the Context" where he "shares his latest insights into the software industry challenges and opportunities."

4 A source that has its own 'capabilities' – a trusted source of information, knowledge, evaluative mechanisms and the experience to make useful judgments about the relative promise and value of other capabilities.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)