The Capital Asset Pricing Model in the 21st Century: Analytical, Empirical, and Behavioral Perspectives

Overview

The Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) and the mean-variance (M-V) rule, which are based on classic expected utility theory, have been heavily criticized theoretically and empirically. The advent of behavioral economics, prospect theory and other psychology-minded approaches in finance challenges the rational investor model from which CAPM and M-V derive. Haim Levy argues that the tension between the classic financial models and behavioral economics approaches is more apparent than real. This book aims to relax ...
See more details below
Paperback
$50.22
BN.com price
(Save 3%)$52.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (11) from $36.98   
  • New (9) from $36.98   
  • Used (2) from $52.13   
The Capital Asset Pricing Model in the 21st Century

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$23.99
BN.com price
(Save 42%)$42.00 List Price

Overview

The Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) and the mean-variance (M-V) rule, which are based on classic expected utility theory, have been heavily criticized theoretically and empirically. The advent of behavioral economics, prospect theory and other psychology-minded approaches in finance challenges the rational investor model from which CAPM and M-V derive. Haim Levy argues that the tension between the classic financial models and behavioral economics approaches is more apparent than real. This book aims to relax the tension between the two paradigms. Specifically, Professor Levy shows that although behavioral economics contradicts aspects of expected utility theory, CAPM and M-V are intact in both expected utility theory and cumulative prospect theory frameworks. There is furthermore no evidence to reject CAPM empirically when ex-ante parameters are employed. Professionals may thus comfortably teach and use CAPM and behavioral economics or cumulative prospect theory as coexisting paradigms.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Currently, trillions of dollars are managed with the aid of quantitative techniques. Major paradigms of quantitative finance include expected utility theory, mean-variance optimization, the closely-related capital asset pricing model, prospect theory, and (Professor Levy's own creation) stochastic dominance. In this book, Professor Levy presents a penetrating analysis of the relationships among these paradigms, often finding mutual support where others find only conflict." - Harry Markowitz, Nobel Laureate, University of California, San Diego

"Levy's book should be required reading for anyone who wants to learn about asset pricing; it is also an essential reference for anyone who wants to contribute to the immense literature in the field, the most important subject in the entire field of finance." - Richard Roll, Anderson School of Management, University of California, Los Angeles

"Here in one volume is a presentation, analysis, and discussion of some of the key pillars of modern financial theory: mean-variance analysis, the capital asset pricing model, expected utility theory, and cumulative prospect theory. Haim Levy presents each theory carefully and completely, discusses the relevant arguments and evidence, and argues convincingly that practitioners and academics should adopt a synthesis that incorporates major elements of these approaches. A real tour de force from one of the major contributors to the field." - William F. Sharpe, Nobel Laureate, Stanford University

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521186513
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 11/30/2011
  • Pages: 456
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Haim Levy is Miles Robinson Professor of Business Administration at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and Dean of the Academic Center of Law and Business, Israel. The author of hundreds of articles in leading academic journals and about 20 books, he has obtained the ranking of the most prolific researcher in finance in the world covering the 40 years through 1986 and the most prolific researcher in finance in the world in the core 16 finance journals covering the 50-year period through 2005. A coauthor with Nobel Laureates Harry Markowitz and Paul Samuelson, Professor Levy's major research contributions have been to the field of stochastic dominance, which sets forth the criteria for decision making under conditions of uncertainty, in both expected utility and prospect theory paradigms. He has also developed economic models for equilibrium asset pricing in an imperfect market. Professor Levy received the Hebrew University's Prize for Excellence in Research in 1996 and the Emet Prize in 2006. He has served as economic adviser to the Bank of Israel and held a University Professor position at the University of Florida and visiting academic positions at the University of California, Berkeley, and the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.D. from the Hebrew University in 1969 and has held a full professorship there since 1976.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1. Overview; 2. Expected utility theory; 3. Expected utility and investment decision rules; 4. The mean-variance rule; 5. The capital asset pricing model (CAPM); 6. Extensions of the CAPM; 7. The CAPM cannot be rejected: empirical and experimental evidence; 8. Theoretical and empirical criticisms of the M-V rule; 9. Prospect theory and expected utility; 10. Cumulative decision weights: no dominance violation; 11. M-V rule, the CAPM, and the cumulative prospect theory: coexistence.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)