Capitalism

Overview


This series provides readers with the information they need to think critically about the worldwide implications of global issues; each volume focuses on a controversial topic of worldwide importance and offers a panoramic view of opinions.; This edition of the Global Viewpoints series explores international attitudes and issues related to capitalism. The title explores the presence of capitalism around the world, with coverage including France, Germany, Russia, China, India, and Africa. Incl; By illuminating ...
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Overview


This series provides readers with the information they need to think critically about the worldwide implications of global issues; each volume focuses on a controversial topic of worldwide importance and offers a panoramic view of opinions.; This edition of the Global Viewpoints series explores international attitudes and issues related to capitalism. The title explores the presence of capitalism around the world, with coverage including France, Germany, Russia, China, India, and Africa. Incl; By illuminating the complexities and interrelations of the global community, this excellent resource helps students and other researchers enhance their global awareness. Each volume focuses on a controversial topic of worldwide importance and offers a pan
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780737756470
  • Publisher: Gale Group
  • Publication date: 2/24/2012
  • Series: Global Viewpoints Series
  • Pages: 224
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Table of Contents

Foreword 11

Introduction 14

Chapter 1 Capitalism Around the World

1 In France and Germany, Anticapitalist Attitudes are Widespread Stefan Theil 20

The economics education in France and Germany is biased against capitalism, reflecting a deeply held economic ideology that endangers European progress.

2 Scandinavian Countries Practice a Superior Form of Capitalism Dominique Moisi 32

The capitalism practiced in the Scandinavian countries of Northern Europe should be the model of capitalism for Europe, if not all of the Western world.

3 Popular Opinion in China Favors Capitalism James A. Dorn 37

The Chinese favor the policies of capitalism and want their government to take greater strides in embracing the free market.

4 In Russia, So-Called Kremlin Capitalism is Fascism, Not Capitalism Peter Foster 42

Although Russia is sometimes said to have Kremlin capitalism, state capitalism, or crony capitalism, in reality its authoritarian government embraces fascism.

5 Africa is Undergoing a Capitalist Revolution that Must Continue Ethan B. Kapstein 48

The continuation of Africa's capitalist revolution, which has had positive economic and political effects, is dependent on free trade with Europe and North America.

Periodical and Internet Sources Bibliography 58

Chapter 2 Capitalism and the Global Financial Crisis

1 Unbridled Capitalism Is to Blame for the Worldwide Financial Crisis Rowan Williams 60

The way capitalism brought about the global financial crisis shows that faith in the market has gone too far and more regulation is needed.

2 Entrepreneurial Capitalism Is Not to Blame for the Worldwide Financial Crisis Leszek Balcerowicz 66

It is the public framework of capitalism?involving interference in the market by the government?that caused the financial crisis, not market capitalism itself.

3 Capitalism Worldwide is Threatened by US Government Response to the Financial Crisis Gary S. Becker Kevin Murphy 71

The response to the global financial crisis should not be government policies that retreat from capitalism, because over the long term capitalism increases global prosperity.

4 The Crisis of Capitalism Requires That the United States Move Away from Consumerism Benjamin R. Barber 79

The global financial crisis demands a revolution in spirit where consumerism is not the cultural ethos and capitalism is put in its place.

5 Australia Should Respond to the Financial Crisis by Rejecting Extreme Capitalism Kevin Rudd 87

Given the failure of neoliberal capitalism, the Australian social democrats have the opportunity to use government to effectively regulate the markets.

6 The Impact of the Crisis on the Developing World Shows the Failure of Global Capitalism Jayati Ghosh 99

The economic boom and ensuing global financial crisis caused by global capitalism have increased inequalities in developing countries, requiring a new model of capitalism.

Periodical and Internet Sources Bibliography 109

Chapter 3 Capitalism and Democracy

1 Capitalism Is Threatening Democracy Worldwide Robert B. Reich 111

Democracies around the world are failing to deal effectively with capitalism's negative side effects due to a misunderstanding of the purpose of capitalism.

2 In the United States and the United Kingdom, Democracy Threatens Capitalism Anatole Kaletsky 120

The popular outrage against bankers and the financial system in democratic countries runs the risk of derailing the economic expansion possible under capitalism.

3 Capitalism Improves the Lives of Women More Than Democracy Does Michael D. Stroup 126

Improvements in economic freedom that bring a country closer to capitalism benefit women in more dramatic ways than improvements in political rights.

4 In Many Countries, Capitalism Exists Without Democracy Paul Gottfried 132

The existence of a capitalist economic framework in a certain country does not require democracy, nor does democracy guarantee continued capitalism.

5 In China, Capitalism Exists Without Political Democracy Boris Johnson 143

Although China has embraced capitalism, experiencing huge economic growth, there is no sign that China will embrace democracy anytime soon.

6 In Latin America, Democratic Countries are Rejecting Capitalism Naomi Klein 152

The democracies of Latin America have chosen socialism over capitalism, despite repeated attempts from inside and out to forcibly implement neoliberalism.

Periodical and Internet Sources Bibliography 163

Chapter 4 Capitalism and Social Welfare Spending

1 Europe Should Not Abandon Its Social Model of Capitalism Jeremy Rifkin 165

The European capitalist model that balances the free market with social programs is superior to the American model of winner-takes-all capitalism.

2 In the United States, Social Insurance Balances the Harms of Capitalism Mark Thoma 173

Social insurance programs such as unemployment compensation, Social Security, and Medicare increase economic efficiency and make society better off.

3 The United States Should Reduce Government Involvement in Social Welfare Jim Manzi 179

Reforms should be made to social welfare programs in the United States to make them more like market institutions with the government role limited to regulation.

4 Japan's Model of Ethical Capitalism Promotes Advanced Welfare Japan Economic Foundation 192

Japan's model of capitalism promotes economic growth and advanced social welfare, making it an ideal model of capitalism for the world.

5 In Canada, the Welfare System Has Masked the Problems with Capitalism Ellen Russell, Wilfrid Laurier University 203

Instead of calling for a return to the former welfare state, Canadians should be questioning the value of the capitalistic market system that produces large inequalities.

6 Iran is Experiencing an Ongoing Struggle Between Welfare Spending and Privatization Rostam Pourzal 208

For decades, the debate about free-market capitalism and welfare spending in Iran has centered on the government's role in the oil industry.

7 Portugal's Welfare State is Keeping It from Succeeding Economically George Bragues 218

The currency crisis in Portugal is a result of several decades of expensive social welfare spending and a lack of economic freedom and growth.

Periodical and Internet Sources Bibliography 223

For Further Discussion 224

Organizations to Contact 226

Bibliography of Books 232

Index 235

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