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Capitol from the Vaults, Vol. 5: The Roots of Rock 'N' Roll
     

Capitol from the Vaults, Vol. 5: The Roots of Rock 'N' Roll

 
The fifth volume in the Capitol From the Vaults series focuses on artists from the label's pre-rock & roll halcyon days -- just as R&B, country & western, jazz, big band, and traditional pop were beginning to cross-pollinate. The results -- as exemplified on this 25-track compilation -- are as disparate as the pre-doo wop sacred harmonies of the Selah Singers'

Overview

The fifth volume in the Capitol From the Vaults series focuses on artists from the label's pre-rock & roll halcyon days -- just as R&B, country & western, jazz, big band, and traditional pop were beginning to cross-pollinate. The results -- as exemplified on this 25-track compilation -- are as disparate as the pre-doo wop sacred harmonies of the Selah Singers' "I'll Be Satisfied" to the double-entendre jive-talkin' on Ella Mae Morse's 12-bar blues "The House of Blue Lights." A decidedly more social effect of these precursors to rock & roll is that the music began to blur racial lines as well. Capitol's roster was indeed more interested in talent than color and, as such, blind to anything but the green from the cash registers. They had plenty of hits during their seminal days as well -- among the chart-topping inclusions are "How High the Moon" (Les Paul and Mary Ford), "Shot Gun Boogie" (Tennessee Ernie Ford), and the opening track "Straighten Up and Fly Right" -- an early bopper from the Nat King Cole Trio -- featuring some nimble electric guitar licks from Oscar Moore. Arguably the most successful crossover artist from the big-band genre was Benny Goodman. His rendition of the "Huckle-Buck" is equally as inspired as the more traditional R&B rendering from vocalist Sis Andrews. Sadly, this is one of the very few of Andrews contributions to have made it on CD. There are many other primordial rockers of note included here, such as the jumpin' jive of "Let the Good Times Roll" -- which was revamped to great effect by Ray Charles and B.B. King, among others. The boogie-woogie "Down the Road Apiece" became performance staples for both Chuck Berry and the Rolling Stones. As always, Billy Vera's liner notes essay is full of behind-the-scenes information. It's a good accompanying read to this CD compilation which is a considerable primer to the birth of rock & roll.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/09/2001
Label:
Capitol
UPC:
0724352829224
catalogNumber:
28292

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Tennessee Ernie Ford   Track Performer
Dean Martin   Track Performer
Ella Mae Morse   Track Performer
Pied Pipers   Track Performer
Jo Stafford   Track Performer
Benny Goodman   Clarinet
Wardell Gray   Tenor Saxophone
Buddy Greco   Piano
Freddie Slack   Conductor
Alvino Rey   Conductor
Merrill Moore   Track Performer
Cliffie Stone   Conductor
Nat King Cole   Vocals
Marvin Johnson   Vocals
Don Raye   Track Performer
Martha Tilton   Track Performer
Crown Prince Waterford   Track Performer
Paul Weston & His Orchestra   Conductor,Track Performer
Doug Mettome   Trumpet
Benny Goodman & His Orchestra   Track Performer
Les Paul & Mary Ford   Track Performer
Alvino Rey & His Orchestra   Track Performer
T-Bone Walker   Track Performer
Geechie Smith   Conductor
Nellie Lutcher & Her Rhythm   Track Performer
Judy Hayden   Vocals

Technical Credits

Louis Prima   Composer
Irving Mills   Composer
Nat King Cole   Composer
Maxwell Davis   Composer
Nancy Hamilton   Composer
James Moore   Composer
Jerry West   Composer
Morgan Lewis   Composer
Fleecie Moore   Composer
Anita Leonard   Composer
Stan Rhodes   Composer
Sam Theard   Composer
Barbara Belle   Composer
Cleve Reed   Composer
Mary London   Composer
Vernon White   Composer
G. Wilson   Composer

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