Captains Courageous

Captains Courageous

3.8 23
by Rudyard Kipling
     
 

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A pampered millionaire's son tumbles overboard from a luxury liner and falls into good fortune, disguised in the form of a fishing boat. The gruff and hearty crew teach the young man to be worth his salt as they fish the waters off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. Brimming with adventure and humor, this classic tale of youthful initiation has delighted readers of all…  See more details below

Overview

A pampered millionaire's son tumbles overboard from a luxury liner and falls into good fortune, disguised in the form of a fishing boat. The gruff and hearty crew teach the young man to be worth his salt as they fish the waters off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. Brimming with adventure and humor, this classic tale of youthful initiation has delighted readers of all ages since 1897.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up-When Rudyard Kipling took up residence in the U.S., he found intriguing characters in the sailing men of New England. This dramatization of his classic novel focuses on a good-humored, hard-working Gloucester fisherman who rescues a spoiled rich boy, Harvey Cheynen, when he falls off a passing steamship. Unconvinced by Harvey's story that his father is a millionaire, Captain Disko Troop and the crew of the We're Here teach the boy the value of a job well done. When the ship returns to port several months later, Harvey is reunited with his exultant parents and there are happy surprises for everyone. Toni Jourdan's adaptation uses key elements of the original text, and the story is presented with enough gusto to give young listeners a taste of Kipling's style. Though some accents lack authenticity and a few performances are uneven, the use of appropriate sound effects enhances this generally well done production by the St. Charles Players. Repeating the last line on the next side of the cassette interrupts the flow of the story but may help youngsters keep their place. The cover art has eye appeal, but the box is made of lightweight cardboard. Playing portions of this dramatization would make an excellent book talk; using it as a whole would give upper elementary and middle school students additional exposure to the works of Kipling.-Barbara S. Wysocki, Cora J. Belden Library, Rocky Hill, CT Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
“The most complete man of genius I have ever known.”—Henry James
 
“Throughout the world his voice commanded more respect than any citizen other than heads of state.”—Mark Twain
 
“Of Kipling’s personal decency there can be no doubt….I for one cannot help wishing that I could offer some kind of tribute.”—George Orwell

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781453857519
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
10/02/2010
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
164
Product dimensions:
8.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.35(d)

Read an Excerpt

Timothy Matovina is assistant professor of theology at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. He is the author of numerous articles and six books, including The Alamo Remembered: Tejano Accounts and Perspectives and (with Virgilio Elizondo) San Fernando Cathedral: Soul of the City.

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From the Publisher
“The most complete man of genius I have ever known.”—Henry James
 
“Throughout the world his voice commanded more respect than any citizen other than heads of state.”—Mark Twain
 
“Of Kipling’s personal decency there can be no doubt….I for one cannot help wishing that I could offer some kind of tribute.”—George Orwell

Meet the Author

Rudyard Joseph Kipling was born in the then named Bombay, India on 30th December 1865. Aged six, he was sent to England to be educated, firstly in Southsea, where he was cared for in a foster home, and later at Westward Ho, a United Services College in Devon. A life of misery at the former was described in his story 'Baa Baa Black Sheep', whilst Westward Ho was used as a basis for his questioning the public school ethic in 'Stalky and Co'. Kipling returned to India in 1882 to work as an assistant editor for the Civil and Military Gazette of Lahore. His reputation as a writer was established with stories of English life in India, published there in 1888/9. ‘The Phantom Rickshaw’, ‘Soldiers Three’ and ‘Under the Deodars’ are amongst these early works. Returning to England in 1889, Kipling settled in London and continued to earn a living as a writer. In 1892 he married Caroline Balestier, an American. They travelled extensively in the following four years, including a spell living in America, and it was in this time most of his enduring work was written, not least ‘The Jungle Book’ and ‘The Second Jungle Book’. Kipling once again returned to England in 1896 and continued his writing career, although tragedy hit the family when his eldest daughter, Josephine, died in 1899. Nonetheless, in 1901 he completed ‘Kim’, often considered to be his best work. The following year, having settled in Sussex, he published ‘Just So Stories’, a book he had planned to write for Josephine. Having refused the position of Poet Laureate, which was offered in 1895, he did accept the Nobel Prize for Literature, becoming the first English author to be so honoured. By 1910, however, Kipling’s appeal was waning. His poems and stories were based on values that were perceived as outdated. There was widespread reaction against Victorian imperialism, highlighted by the incompetent management of the Boer War. When World War I came, Kipling had difficulty in adapting to the mood of the public and after his only son, John, was reported missing in action believed killed in 1915, he became very active on the War Graves Commission. After the war he became an increasingly isolated figure, although some of his best writing was to come, with ‘Debits and Credits’ in 1926 and ‘Limits and Renewals’ in 1932. Kipling died in 1936 in London and was buried in Westminster Abbey. Today, however, he is once again avidly read not just for the quality of his writing and storytelling, but through a renewed interest in the behaviour and values he represented.

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Captains Courageous 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Oh my gosh! i was at the end of my seat when i read this novel! It was so amazing how life at sea can change one man's heart! it is really a super duper story and i recommend it to all you sea lovers out there, it is AWSOME
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a very good book but you need to be able to understand some pretty difficult dialect. I've read a lot of Mark Twain before without trouble but i found this book to be extremely hard to understand during any dialog.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Have you ever fallen off a huge ship at night when there’s so much fog you can’t see past you hand? Well the book is about a 15 year old spoiled kid from America that gets 200 dollars a month and lives in a mansion. He fell off the boat because a German dared him to smoke a cigar; he tried and felt sick and went to the side of the where he passed out and fell off the side into the ocean! A few minutes later a fisherman picks him out of the water and puts him in a bed. He wakes up in the morning not knowing where he is, the captain tells him he is on a fishing boat that will be on the sea for about 6 months. He learns to work on the boat and gets paid 10.50$ a month for working his butt off, and his mom and dad think he’s dead somewhere in the middle of the ocean. There are hundreds of fishing boats in this one area fishing when this one guy dies. They take all of his belongings and auction them off. Danny, Harvey’s friend is a boy that has to work to get his money which is very little and loves to fish. He buys his knife and give it to Harvey, but Harvey doesn’t know if he should take it because it belonged to a dead guy. Later they have a funeral and strap an anchor on him and throw him into the ocean. Danny and Harvey were out at sea fishing miles from where they put him into the sea. They catch him on one of the lines. They freak out and throw the knife into the water so he can have it back even though he’s dead. The fishing year is finally over and they all get to go home; but will Harvey ever see his parents again because he doesn’t even know where they are? You should read this book, it was really good and it was easy to read. I would recommend it for someone to read it is 250 pages long and very easy to read. It is also one really interesting book, I enjoyed reading it.
Ausonius More than 1 year ago
Which version of CAPTAINS COURAGEOUS am I reviewing? Not the original 1897 novel by Rudyard Kipling but a 2002 Great Illustrated Classics issue adapted by Malvina Vogel and illustrated by Ken Landgraf. It is called the Library Edition, bare-boned, no notes, chapter summaries, etc. There are as many pages of pen and ink sketches as there are of text. And the Vogel text is perhaps 85 % shorter than Kipling's original. Well-known adapter Vogel aims at readers ten years old and up. *** I, who am 76 years old and blessed with six grandsons and two granddaughters, have little doubt that the Vogel-Landgraf shortened, illustrated edition will be a hit with the youngsters whom it targets. The plot is simple enough: Around 1895 Harvey ("Harve") Cheyne falls off an ocean liner, is rescued by a fishing schooner and spends three months learning to be a cod fisherman. Back in the schooner's home port of Gloucester, Massachusetts, Harve telegraphs his multi-millionaire father in San Diego, is soon reunited with his parents and plans a sea-related future. He has been transformed from a self-centered, pampered mama's boy into a thoughtful, caring young man. *** My review focuses on what there is for adults in the Vogel-Landgraf adaptation. I assume that you already know the original novel. It abounds in symbolism (sea and baptism, a bloody nose and the sacrament of Confirmation, a fishing boat as monastery with abbot (Captain Troop), prior (co-owner Uncle Salters) and eight (temporarily) celibate male monks who welcome novice Harve to their fellowship. Several religions and superstitions appear in the novel. CAPTAINS COURAGEOUS is also a critique of then rapidly rising destructive economic values of America's Gilded Age. All this is layers deeper than the simple tale of a spoiled rich kid growing up quickly through obedience and hard work, especially through male-bonded teamwork. *** Those depths are not there in the Vogel-Landgraf adaptation. Malvina Vogel adds sentences here and there, initially one that makes young Harve Cheyne look more impolite than Kipling did. She eliminates some key scenes. But she also does some things right, from an adult's point of view. Take the three film retellings of CAPTAINS COURAGEOUS. In the first, Manuel the fisherman who pulls Harve out of the Atlantic -- played for an Oscar by Spencer Tracy -- is killed off at sea. In the second Harve has no mother. In the third he has neither mother nor father. Admittedly, Kipling devotes relatively few words to the only two important female characters: Constance Cheyne, Harve's mother, and to the mother of the only other boy on the schooner We're Here. But those women exist and make a difference. To her credit Malvina retains them, and all other characters of the 1897 novel. And illustrator Landgraf sketches both of them, too. *** In the 1870s Kipling's own mother had told Kipling's Headmaster that her son had a soft feminine streak. In CAPTAINS COURAGEOUS, Kipling says that Harve inherited brains from his self-made tycoon father and sensitivity from his mother. At novel's end, previously hysterical Constance wins the hearts of every man on the We're Here and overcomes her Unitarian disdain of Catholics to make a large bequest to Harve's savior Manuel's church on the hill in Gloucester. Kipling hinted at some strengths of character in Mrs Cheyne. And the Vogel-Landgraf team keeps her very much alive, caring and credible. -OOO-
Guest More than 1 year ago
Yes, There is such a thing as a heart changing sea tale. This story tells of a young boy who is cast off a cruise liner. This boy being very rich, he of course is spoiled, and disliked (a.k.a.BRAT..like my brother...) When he is cast on this fishing boat of poor, rustic fisherman, he has a change of heart, and well, I don't wanna give it away. C'mon, how lazy can u get?Read it yourself. I'm not even a book person, and I LOVED this book.
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kamas716 More than 1 year ago
This is a great book. There are some imperfections in this version, though. The transfer process has occasionally misidentified letters; la=k, nn=rm, etc. If you don't mind having to translate a little bit this is a fine version. Otherwise, you may want to plunk down the cash for a cleaner version. 4/5 only because of the transfer errors.
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agathaNG More than 1 year ago
One of Kipling's best! Although the movie Hollywood made was well done, their attempt the "modernize" the story destroys some of the books charm.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
It is not worth the time it takes to read this 'WORK OF ART'. It is certainly not Kiplings OPUS
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was at the farm and needed something to read and picked it up and was engrossed by the expert writing, characterization, plot but then the last fourth of the novel took a surprising nose dive. It was as if Kipling the defender of the British empire has been too sympathetic to the working class fishermen and needed to portray the exploiting minority as kind, worthy of worship and paternalistic [parasites]. I'm curious to see the notes that he might have kept to explain such an abrupt poor writing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a fun book to read, and was hard to understand, but I think it was a great book, and I recommend it to almost anyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
i once had a liberary book captain courageous it was so good for me i liked it alot that i just finish all of it it was outstanding and five star rated
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Jo: Great! Because u were the first u can be my right hand woman. But first u need to interview u. Please take a seat and fill out this form