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Captive Selves, Captivating Others: The Politics And Poetics Of Colonial American Captivity Narratives
     

Captive Selves, Captivating Others: The Politics And Poetics Of Colonial American Captivity Narratives

by Pauline Turner Strong
 

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ISBN-10: 0813316669

ISBN-13: 9780813316666

Pub. Date: 11/01/2000

Publisher: Avalon Publishing

This book reexamines the Anglo-American literary genre known as the “Indian captivity narrative” in the context of the complex historical practice of captivity across cultural borders in colonial North America. This detailed and nuanced study of the relationship between practice and representation on the one hand, and identity and alterity on the other.

Overview

This book reexamines the Anglo-American literary genre known as the “Indian captivity narrative” in the context of the complex historical practice of captivity across cultural borders in colonial North America. This detailed and nuanced study of the relationship between practice and representation on the one hand, and identity and alterity on the other. It is an important contribution to cultural studies, American studies, Native American studies, women's studies, and historical anthropology.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780813316666
Publisher:
Avalon Publishing
Publication date:
11/01/2000
Series:
Institutional Structures of Feeling Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
280
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

Table of Contents

List of Maps and Figuresix
Chronology of Events, 1576-1776xi
Preface and Acknowledgmentsxiii
A Note on the Textxvii
1Introduction: Captivity As Convergent Practice and Selective Tradition1
Identity, Alterity, and the Process of Typification3
Scholarly Traditions of Captivity9
The Politics and Poetics of Captivity: An Overview13
Notes15
2Indian Captives, English Captors, 1576-162219
European Devourers and Their Prey20
Kidnapping Tokens and Informants: Frobisher's Inuit Captives23
Capturing Allies and Enemies: Tisquantum, Alias Squanto32
Notes37
3Captivity and Hostage-Exchange in Powhatan's Domain, 1607-162443
A Christian for a Savage: The Middle Ground of Hostage-Exchange43
The Captivity and Transformation of John Smith48
The Captivity and Typification of Pocahontas63
Captivity, Conquest, and Resistance70
Notes71
4The Politics and Poetics of Captivity in New England, 1620-168277
Indigenous and Convergent Captivity Practices78
Metacom's War, Wetamo's Grievances, and the Captivity of Mary Rowlandson83
Wilderness Trials: A Gentlewoman's Conversion Narrative96
Captivity, Servitude, and Authority103
Notes106
5Seduction, Redemption, and the Typification of Captivity, 1675-1707115
To Live Like Heathen: The Two Hannahs118
Texts Written in Blood: Cotton Mather and the Production of Meaning128
Redeemed and Unredeemed Captives: John and Eunice Williams135
Typification, Subordination, and the Limits of Hegemony143
Notes145
6Captive Ethnographers, 1699-1736151
Shared Substance, Shared Light: The Dickinson and Hanson Narratives152
Manners and Customs: The Transculturated Captive166
Notes172
7Captivity and Colonial Structures of Feeling, 1744-1776177
Providence and Sentiment in the Mid-Eighteenth Century178
Horrifying Matters of Fact: The Production of Savagery and Heroism192
Conclusion: The Selective Tradition of Captivity200
Notes206
AppendixBibliography of British and British Colonial Captivity Narratives, 1682-1776211
References219
Index253

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