The Captured: A True Story of Abduction by Indians on the Texas Frontier

The Captured: A True Story of Abduction by Indians on the Texas Frontier

4.4 17
by Scott Zesch
     
 

ISBN-10: 0312317875

ISBN-13: 9780312317874

Pub. Date: 11/10/2004

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

"On New Year's Day in 1870, ten-year-old Adolph Korn's life as the son of a poor German-speaking farmer ended, and his life as a Comanche began." "On that day, an Indian raiding party kidnapped the boy from his neighbor's pasture in the Texas Hill Country. With little hope of finding him alive and no resources - material or political - his loved ones eventually gave…  See more details below

Overview

"On New Year's Day in 1870, ten-year-old Adolph Korn's life as the son of a poor German-speaking farmer ended, and his life as a Comanche began." "On that day, an Indian raiding party kidnapped the boy from his neighbor's pasture in the Texas Hill Country. With little hope of finding him alive and no resources - material or political - his loved ones eventually gave him up for dead." "However, Adolph survived his capture, and soon thrived in the rough, nomadic life of the Plains Indians. Within a year, he had become one of the Comanche's fiercest warriors." "For nearly three years, Adolph fought alongside his fellow Comanches against the encroaching white settlers, buffalo hunters, and U.S. soldiers who threatened their survival. Forcibly returned to his parents when the army "captured" him a second time, Korn held fast to his Native American ways and never found a place in white society. He spent his last years living alone in a cave, an eccentric oddity forgotten by his family." "That is, until Scott Zesch stumbled over his relative's barely marked grave in a neglected corner of an old cemetery in Mason, Texas. Determined to know more about his ancestor and understand how a timid farm boy like Adolph could have become so thoroughly Indianized in such a short time, Zesch tracked down surviving relatives, dug for primary sources in archives across the West, talked with Comanche elders, and expanded his search to include other child captives from the region, who also became some of the most Indianized whites in history." Set against a backdrop of intense political wrangling and bloody confrontations between the U.S. government and Native Americans, The Captured is a true account of what settlers considered a "fate worse than death" - and the dramatic, very personal story of Adolph Korn and eight other children abducted by Comanches and Apaches in the Texas Hill Country.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312317874
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
11/10/2004
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
384
Product dimensions:
5.78(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.31(d)

Table of Contents

Contents

PROLOGUE: The Trail,
PART ONE: A Fate Worse Than Death,
CHAPTER ONE: New Year's Day,
CHAPTER TWO: Germans in Comanche Land,
CHAPTER THREE: The Bosom of the Comanches,
CHAPTER FOUR: Legion Valley,
CHAPTER FIVE: Warriors in Training,
PART TWO: In the Wilds,
CHAPTER SIX: As Mean an Indian as There Was,
CHAPTER SEVEN: Searchers and Quakers,
CHAPTER EIGHT: Death on the Red River,
CHAPTER NINE: The Long Way Home,
CHAPTER TEN: Resisting the Reservation,
PART THREE: Redemption,
CHAPTER ELEVEN: Once and Always Indians,
CHAPTER TWELVE: In the Limelight,
CHAPTER THIRTEEN: The Trail Fades,
TABLE: Dates and Places of Birth, Capture, Recovery, and Death,
NOTES,
BIBLIOGRAPHY,
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS,
INDEX,

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Captured 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 17 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have just completed reading this book by Scott Zesch and found it to be beautifully written. The book reads very smooth from beginning to end and is written with such compasion. I was so impressed with the author I checked to see what else he had written and was disappointed to know he only had one other book published. I would defintely recommend 'The Captured' to anyone who embraces the West.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Very good read except for the missing pages--about one per chapter, which ruins the continuity. Sloppy and careless on the part of production.
readerofallSW More than 1 year ago
I have just finished this book and did not want it to end. I thoroughly enjoyed it and knowing that it was so well researched. Now to find some other books like this. I am passing the book on to a friend.
Bonkwaddle More than 1 year ago
Well written, documented, and interesting. Must read for American History Buffs!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was intrigued at first, then got so caught up that I can't wait to read more about the white captives or white indians! Very well researched and written and gives a good account of what the captives experienced with the Indians.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Though I had read specific accounts of some of these captives, I have never read any book which so expertly relates their individual stories while comparing and contrasting their experiences and attempting to give explanations for the resulting changes in the children. I was thoroughly impressed with the researching and the filtering through masses of materials to separate fact from legend. This very readable book allowed me to gain insights into not only the captives, but also the political movements of the time.
Anonymous 10 months ago
Well written with impressive documentation. Highly recommend.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A great read. It would have been interesting if an indepth comparison of what we now know as Stolkholm Syndrome was discussed regarding these kids. As much as many want to believe the kidnapped kids preferred Indian life so much more they never wanted to leave and even went back to once liberated, they had been completey indoctrinated by violent domestic terrorists of another age. Historians can tend to insinute a bias towards Native American life being superior, more noble and free hence preferrable. I think that insinuation exists here and possibly helped the author feel better about the fate of his ancestor, who knows. It is politically correct to portray that but it doesnt paint the full picture. The Commanche were not what I would call good people back then, even before Europeans showed up they were raping and murdering and stealing from their neighbors. Not noble, not admirable. Criminal. Regardless, form your own conclusion about the events. This book is a good one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was very interesting and informative. It was hard to put down. Not only did the author cover life in the Indian camps, but also what life was like when they were returned to their families and how they ended their lives.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Incredibly intriguing. Recommend!!!
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