CardMaker's Hand-Lettering Workbook

CardMaker's Hand-Lettering Workbook

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by Nancy Burke, Marian Rodenhizer
     
 

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A selection of lettering samples, a review of necessary tools, and a tutorial for each alphabet round out this instruction book for card-making enthusiasts. Sample projects stimulate crafters, with 17 fonts to choose from, including Bubbly, Casual, Frosty, Typewriter, and Vacation. The ruled pages included at the back of the book can be photocopied and used for

Overview

A selection of lettering samples, a review of necessary tools, and a tutorial for each alphabet round out this instruction book for card-making enthusiasts. Sample projects stimulate crafters, with 17 fonts to choose from, including Bubbly, Casual, Frosty, Typewriter, and Vacation. The ruled pages included at the back of the book can be photocopied and used for lettering practice.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596354579
Publisher:
DRG
Publication date:
10/23/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
64
Sales rank:
867,373
File size:
6 MB

Read an Excerpt

CardMaker's Hand-Lettering Workbook


By Nancy Burke, Marian Rodenhizer, Tanya Fox, Matthew Owen

DRG

Copyright © 2011 DRG
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-59635-457-9



CHAPTER 1

BLOCK

This lettering style can either be drawn following a baseline, or completely free-form with letters slightly below or above the adjacent letter. Practice first by drawing on a baseline and then when comfortable, experiment with letter placement.

Project note: This is a very basic block lettering style that can be decorated, shaded and embellished in so many fun and whimsical ways. Get creative and have fun!

1. Using a pencil, lightly draw basic uppercase letters. Be sure to leave enough space between each letter for altering.

2. Using a larger-tip marker, outline each letter to widen them, being careful to make each letter roughly the same width.

3. Erase all pencil lines, leaving only the outline.

4. Using a fine-tip pen, outline the colored marker as shown below.

5. Using watercolor pencils, watercolors or regular colored pencils, shade in letter from top to bottom and light to dark.

Font created by Nancy Burke

CHAPTER 2

BUBBLY

This lettering style can either be drawn following a baseline or completely free-form with letters slightly below or above the adjacent letter. Practice first by drawing on a baseline and then when comfortable, experiment with letter placement.

Project note: This alphabet is a truly free-form alphabet and can be as fun and whimsical as you want to make it. There are no hard rules to this lettering style other than to make sure you do not get so carried away that the letters lose their readability. Just about anything that has a rounded edge, whether it be balloons, bubbles or even chocolate chip cookies, can be drawn using this style.

1. Lightly draw basic uppercase letters. Be sure to leave enough space between each letter for altering.

2. Draw a wide, rounded outline around each letter, taking care that every part of the letter is round with no straight lines. You can create an overlapped look at this point by outlining each letter to appear to be "tucked" behind an adjacent letter.

3. Using a fine-tip pen or marker, trace over outline. Erase any visible pencil lines.

4. Color letters in with colored pencils, watercolors or markers. Shade and create further dimension by adding decorative elements, such as additional smaller bubbles and reflection marks.

Font created by Nancy Burke

CHAPTER 3

casual

Using a pencil, lightly draw a base, middle and top guideline where you wish your sentiment or title to appear. Following these guidelines closely will ensure that all letters are the same height. Make sure that there is an even amount of space below, above and along each edge of your finished letter to accommodate adjustments made in each step.

Project note: This lettering style looks best when done with a fine- to medium-tip pen. When drawn with an opaque pen or marker onto dark paper, a very dramatic look can be achieved. This lettering style is also quite elegant when done with a calligraphy pen or marker. Experiment with several types of pen and marker tips and colors to get a variety of looks. Ascenders and descenders are extended — double the height and depth.

1. Keeping bottom edge of all letters touching your baseline, and tilting hand slightly to create a slanted, italic appearance to each letter, carefully draw out your sentiment or title in cursive using a pencil. Doing this in a slow and steady manner will ensure that all letters are slanted the same angle.

2. Trace over your original letters, making sure to exaggerate the ascenders and descenders, elongating serifs.

3. Trace over adjusted pencil lines with a fine- to medium-tip pen or marker. Allow adequate time for pen ink to dry completely and erase any visible pencil lines.

Font created by Marian Rodenhizer

CHAPTER 4

DAISY

This lettering style can either be drawn following a baseline (as in the steps below), or letters can be drawn free-form to appear to "bounce" (as in Bridal Shower Invitation card on page 46). If drawn free-form, you may wish to use a ruler simply to keep letters roughly the same height and width.

Project note: This alphabet is one of the easiest ways to turn a basic lettering style into something truly decorative and unique. The sky's the limit when it comes to designs and objects that can be drawn at the ends of each letter line. Imagine pretty pink buttons for a sweet baby shower invitation or baseballs for a sports fan's birthday card.

1. Lightly draw each letter in your sentiment or title, making sure enough space is left between each letter to add flowers or other decorative details to the ends of each letter line.

2. Draw small, decorative images and designs, such as hearts or flowers, at the ends of each letter line.

3. Using a fine-tip pen or marker, trace over lines. Color in decorative details with colored pencils, watercolors or markers. Erase any visible pencil lines.

4. You can further embellish each letter by drawing additional wavy lines over the straight letter lines.

Font created by Nancy Burke

CHAPTER 5

EVERYDAY

The Everyday Alphabet is another good example of a lettering style that can be practiced in order to build basic lettering skills. After drawing your guidelines lightly with a pencil, trace or draw directly onto the paper until you feel comfortable with the appearance of your letters.

Project note: This lettering style looks best when following the base and top guidelines closely. This alphabet lends itself to a very natural combination of printed and cursive letters. Feel free to sometimes join the letters and other times let them stand alone. This alphabet looks best when a combination of upper and lower case is used. The use of a calligraphy pen can also make this lettering style quite elegant.

Font created by Marian Rodenhizer

CHAPTER 6

FANCY

Using a pencil, lightly draw a base, middle and top guideline where you wish your sentiment or title to appear. Following these guidelines will ensure that all letters are relatively the same in height.

Project note: This lettering style can be kept simple or very decorative with extra flourishes. Try experimenting by adding additional curls to already curly letter lines as in the Fancy Monogram Card on page 48.

1. Keeping bottom edge of all letters touching your baseline, and tilting hand slightly to create a slanted appearance to each letter, carefully draw out your sentiment or title in cursive using a pencil. Doing this in a slow and steady manner will ensure that all letters are slanted the same angle.

2. Using a pencil, embellish each letter by exaggerating serifs and curls at the ends of letter lines. Refer to finished alphabet for suggested adjustments.

3. Trace over letters with a fine- to medium-tip marker. Allow adequate time for pen ink to dry completely and erase any visible pencil lines.

Font created by Marian Rodenhizer

CHAPTER 7

flag day

Draw your baseline where you would like the bottom of each letter to "sit." These letters will be rather wide when completed, so be sure to allow adequate spacing between each letter. Lightly draw a middle and top line to ensure letters are the same height as well.

Project note: This alphabet can be one of the more difficult lettering styles to master. But with a little practice, it will easily become a favorite. Be sure to follow each step for all letters before moving onto the next step, rather than completing one letter at a time. This will ensure that letters are more uniform in their overall appearance.

1. Using a pencil, lightly draw basic lowercase letters.

2. Draw an outline around each letter to widen them, being careful to make each roughly the same width. You may also make the bottom half of each letter slightly wider than the top half. This will give letters a slight "bell bottom" appearance as in the It's a Picnic card.

3. Erase original center pencil lines.

4. In the center of each letter, draw a small image or object. This could be a star, a flower or, as in the It's a Picnic card, a watermelon seed.

5. To further embellish letters, draw stripes on the bottom half of each letter and color in with colored pencils, watercolors or markers.

Font created by Nancy Burke

CHAPTER 8

FLING

Using a pencil, draw your baseline where you would like the bottom of each letter to "sit." To keep letters the same height, you may also wish to draw a top guideline as well. Be sure to leave enough room at the beginning and end of your sentiment or title, as well as between each letter, to add decorative serifs.

Project note: This alphabet is a variation of the very popular Art Deco lettering style. This is typically seen as an all-caps font and has better readability as such, but with a little practice, can be done in lowercase letters as well.

1. Using a pencil, lightly draw basic letters, keeping them nearly as wide as they are tall.

2. Using a straightedge or ruler to keep lines straight, widen the left main vertical line of each letter.

3. Add serifs to the ends of each letter line. Serifs can either be straight, curly or a combination of both. Curly serifs can either be open swirls or closed circles. Refer to complete alphabet for serif style and placement.

4. Using a Fine-tip pen or marker, trace over lines. Erase any visible pencil lines. Draw small decorative elements such as flowers or hearts. Or, start in the widened area of each letter and fill in letters with colored pencils, watercolors or markers.

Font created by Nancy Burke

CHAPTER 9

FROSTY

This lettering style can either follow a baseline, or be more free-form. Similar to the Daisy Alphabet, use a ruler to keep each individual letter roughly the same height and width and to keep letter lines straight.

Project note: This is a simple, yet fun alphabet that can be used for just about anything by changing the snowflakes to simple dots. You can also make it very artistic and unique by adding almost any type of decorative element you can think of. Try mixing uppercase and lowercase letters for a more whimsical look.

1. Lightly draw each letter in your sentiment or title, making sure enough space is left between each letter to add snowflakes or other decorative details to the ends of each letter line.

2. Erase any visible pencil lines, leaving small dots at the intersections and ends of each letter line as shown. These will serve as your guide in the next step.

3. Using a slightly wide and lighter-colored marker or colored pencil, reconnect points to re-form all letter lines.

4. Using a darker, Fine-tip pen or marker, trace over letter lines in a wavy manner. You may wish to practice this on scratch paper until you feel comfortable and have a consistent wrist motion.

5. Draw small decorative images and designs, such as snowflakes, hearts or flowers, at the ends of each letter line and at dots.

Font created by Nancy Burke

CHAPTER 10

FUNKY

Due to the uniqueness of this lettering style, and the fact that it lends itself well to a "bouncing" appearance, it is best to begin by using a pencil to lightly draw boxes for each letter. Keep each box similar in shape and size to ensure the finished letters follow suit.

Project note: This alphabet is lots of fun once you get the hang of it! The best part is filling it in with your own colorful elements and artwork. Try ladybugs for a fun summer party or big, bold blooms for that '70s "flower power" look.

1. Lightly draw basic uppercase letters inside each box, leaving a little room around each letter for widening.

2. Widen each letter so that the bottom half is slightly wider than the top half. This will create "bell bottom" appearance to the letters.

3. Trace over outline with a fine-tip pen or marker and erase any visible pencil lines.

4. Create a dimensional shadow effect by creating a second, thin outline at the bottom and left side of each letter. Fill in letters with decorative elements, such as stripes, polka dots or other line art, using colored pencils, watercolors or markers.

Font created by Nancy Burke

CHAPTER 11

PRINCESS

Draw your baseline where you would like the bottom of each letter to "sit." Be sure to leave enough room at the beginning and end of your sentiment or word to add decorative serifs. You may also wish to draw a top guideline as well in order to keep letters the same height.

Project note: This lettering style is very feminine, but can easily be adapted for more masculine projects. Replace the curly serifs with straight lines, and opt for a less feminine center element.

1. Lightly draw basic letters, keeping them nearly as wide as they are tall.

2. Widen the left or right main vertical line of each letter.

3. Create a slight flare at the bottom and top of each widened area of each letter and add double curly serifs to the ends of letter lines.

4. Using a fine-tip pen or marker, trace over lines. Erase any visible pencil lines.

5. Lightly draw additional decorative elements such as bows, flowers or stars in the centers of flared areas. Finish by coloring letters with colored pencils, watercolors or markers.

Font created by Nancy Burke

CHAPTER 12

ROMAN

Using a pencil, lightly draw a base and top guideline where you wish your sentiment or title to appear. Following these guidelines closely will ensure that all letters are the same height.

Project note: At first glance, this lettering style may appear to be rather simple, but it can be quite difficult to master in its near perfect uniformity. Be careful to keep your proportions accurate. As with any lettering style, practice makes perfect! This lettering style also lends itself to unlimited variety by using extra pens and pencils to highlight and emphasize each letter.

1. Keeping bottom edge of all letters touching your baseline and using a pencil, lightly draw each letter of your sentiment or title. Bowls of lowercase letters are slightly slanted. You may wish to draw each letter using a ruler or other straightedge.

2. Trace over pencil lines with a fine- to medium-tip pen or marker. Allow adequate time for pen ink to dry completely and erase any visible pencil lines.

3. Try bouncing letters for a fun and casual look. Keep the proportion and size of each letter consistent but raise or lower each letter from the baseline. Twist the letters slightly to give it more variation.

Font created by Marian Rodenhizer

CHAPTER 13

SUMMER

Using a pencil, lightly draw a base, middle and top guideline where you wish your sentiment or title to appear. Make sure that there is an even amount of space below, above and along each edge of your finished letter to accommodate adjustments made in each step below.

Project note: This is a very easy lettering style to mastei with only a minimal amount of effort. A few practice strokes on a scratch piece of paper, and you will be using this versatile yet whimsical lettering style on all of your cards and projects. This alphabet lends itself to "bouncing" letters to give an overall fun and casual look.

1. Keeping the bottom edge of all letters touching your baseline, and using a pencil, lightly draw each letter of your sentiment or title.

2. Since this lettering style is based on an oval shape, go back over the bowls (rounded areas) of each letter, slightly widening them to create a horizontal oval. Keep these ovals small and compact, while longer vertical lines, as well as ascenders and descenders can be exaggerated and lengthened.

3. Lightly draw very small serifs to the ends of each letter line. Refer to complete alphabet for placement of serifs.

4. Trace over entire letter with a fine- to medium-tip pen or marker. Allow adequate time for pen ink to dry completely and erase any visible pencil lines.

Font created by Marian Rodenhizer


(Continues...)

Excerpted from CardMaker's Hand-Lettering Workbook by Nancy Burke, Marian Rodenhizer, Tanya Fox, Matthew Owen. Copyright © 2011 DRG. Excerpted by permission of DRG.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Nancy Burke teaches artistic lettering, scrapbooking, and paper crafting at retreats, conventions, and retailers throughout the United States. She lives in Melba, Idaho. Marian Rodenhizer is a lettering artist. She lives in Port Ewan, New York.

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CardMaker's Hand-Lettering Workbook 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
DogLadyTN More than 1 year ago
Unfortunately, I haven't had time to actually sit down and practice with this book, but there are at least two alphabets that I really like. I'm looking forward to trying some or all of them.....maybe even "tweaking" one offered to create my very own.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This could have been a truly good book, but there are a couple of glaring omissions. There are no instructions or samples of lower-case letters. Also, while the supply list for projects is complete, there is no commentary or tips. Good for travel.