Career Management & Work-Life Integration: Using Self-Assessment to Navigate Contemporary Careers

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Overview

Career Management & Work/Life Integration: Using Self-Assessment to Navigate Contemporary Careers is a comprehensive, easy-to-follow guide to managing contemporary careers. Although grounded in theory, the book also provides an extensive set of exercises and activities that can guide career management over the lifespan. Authors Brad Harrington and Douglas T. Hall offer a highly useful self-assessment guide for students and other individuals who want to deal with the challenge of succeeding in a meaningful career while living a happy, well-balanced life.

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Editorial Reviews

Newsletter
"Back around the turn of the century, I was on the Alliance for Work-Life Progress board, and some of the board members found their jobs and offices being downsized as a fairly lengthy recession set in. I have been in touch with many of these folks since then, and they have all done well, but mainly by changing careers. What they really needed was Career Management and Work-Life Integration, by Brad Harrington and Douglas Hall (2007). As the authors note, job ladders inside of corporations (and job security) are largely a thing of the past. For young or mature adults, the implications of that shift are enormous. Specializing can be dangerous, and making yourself indispensable may not be a great idea. So individual career planning becomes on one level more difficult and less useful because the unexpected is always just around the corner, but on another level far more important if you don't want to end up stuck doing work you don't like for a company you like even less... And this really is a work-family book, which is anything but surprising once you take in the implications of modern careers: the difficulties of navigating contemporary careers are heavily compounded for modern families, where dual-earners are the norm, and fathers as well as mothers expect to devote substantial time to children and, increasingly, elderly parents and relatives. And corporate work-life policies become important for a reason that is often downplayed: attracting talent. My reading of most of the literature on the business case for work-life is that it tends to emphasize talent retention. But that may be the wrong angle if the problem is getting the right people, and planning on fairly short 'career' duration. I should mention that much of the book is very much practical, with exercises designed to draw out the reader's values, aspirations, history, and family situation in order to make sense of — and plan for — the future. I highly recommend it for that practical purposes, but genuinely enjoyed it as a contribution to rethinking the way work & family will play out in the future. Great stuff!” — Bob Drago
Business India
"Its key features develop a bridge between theory and application, offering a rigorous self-assessment process and providing a more thorough experiential view than most existing books. "— Johnson Thomas
Business India - Johnson Thomas
"Its key features develop a bridge between theory and application, offering a rigorous self-assessment process and providing a more thorough experiential view than most existing books."
Newsletter - Bob Drago
"Back around the turn of the century, I was on the Alliance for Work-Life Progress board, and some of the board members found their jobs and offices being downsized as a fairly lengthy recession set in. I have been in touch with many of these folks since then, and they have all done well, but mainly by changing careers. What they really needed was Career Management and Work-Life Integration, by Brad Harrington and Douglas Hall (2007). As the authors note, job ladders inside of corporations (and job security) are largely a thing of the past. For young or mature adults, the implications of that shift are enormous. Specializing can be dangerous, and making yourself indispensable may not be a great idea. So individual career planning becomes on one level more difficult and less useful because the unexpected is always just around the corner, but on another level far more important if you don't want to end up stuck doing work you don't like for a company you like even less... And this really is a work-family book, which is anything but surprising once you take in the implications of modern careers: the difficulties of navigating contemporary careers are heavily compounded for modern families, where dual-earners are the norm, and fathers as well as mothers expect to devote substantial time to children and, increasingly, elderly parents and relatives. And corporate work-life policies become important for a reason that is often downplayed: attracting talent. My reading of most of the literature on the business case for work-life is that it tends to emphasize talent retention. But that may be the wrong angle if the problem is getting the right people, and planning on fairly short 'career' duration. I should mention that much of the book is very much practical, with exercises designed to draw out the reader's values, aspirations, history, and family situation in order to make sense of — and plan for — the future. I highly recommend it for that practical purposes, but genuinely enjoyed it as a contribution to rethinking the way work & family will play out in the future. Great stuff!”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781412954105
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications
  • Publication date: 6/19/2007
  • Pages: 248
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Brad Harrington: Brad is the executive director of the Boston College Center for Work & Family (CWF) and a research professor of organization studies in the Carroll School of Management at Boston College. CWF is a national leader in helping organizations create effective workplaces that support and develop healthy and productive employees. The center pro­vides a bridge linking the academic community to the some of the world’s most progressive companies in the human resource arena.

Before coming to Boston College, Brad spent 20 years with Hewlett­Packard Company, working in a broad range of executive and management positions in quality improvement, human resources, education, manage­ment development, and organization development in the United States and Europe. His roles included chief quality officer for HP’s worldwide medical products business and head of HP’s management and organization develop­ment organization. Brad holds a bachelor’s degree in business administra­tion from Stonehill College, a master’s degree in psychology from Boston College, and a doctorate in human resource development and organization development from Boston University. Brad has consulted with many corpo­rations and healthcare organizations on strategic planning, cultural change, leadership development, career management, and work–life systems. In 2006, Brad was honored as one of the Ten Most Influential Men in the Work–Life Field.

Brad is married to Dr. Annie Soisson, and they have three children: Maggie, Hannah, and Dillon. Brad and his family reside in Winchester, Massachusetts.

Douglas T. Hall: Tim is the director of the Executive Development Roundtable and the Morton H. and Charlotte Friedman Professor of Management in the School of Management at Boston University. He is also faculty director of the MBA program. He has served as acting dean and asso­ciate dean of faculty development and faculty director for the master’s pro­grams at the School of Management. He received his graduate degrees from the Sloan School of Management at MIT. He has held faculty positions at Yale, York, Michigan State, and Northwestern universities and visiting posi­tions at Columbia, Minnesota, and the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

Tim’s books include Careers In and Out of Organizations, The Career Is Dead—Long Live the Career: A Relational Approach to Careers, Careers in Organizations, Organizational Climates and Careers, The Two-Career Couple, Experiences in Management and Organizational Behavior, Career Develop­ment in Organizations, Human Resource Management: Strategy Design and Implementation, and Handbook of Career Theory. He is a recipient of the American Psychological Association’s James Mc Keen Cattell Award (now called the Ghiselli Award) for research design, the American Society for Training and Development’s Walter Storey Professional Practice Award, and the Academy of Management’s Everett C. Hughes Award for Career Research. He is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the Academy of Management, where he served as a member of the Board of Governors and as president of the Organizational Behavior Division and co-founder and president of the Careers Division.

Tim is married to Marcy Crary, and he has three children and five grandchildren.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Acknowledgments
1. Understanding the New Career
Three Career Cases
The Barnes Family
Helen Casey
The Smith Family
The Changing Landscape of Careers
The Changing Nature of Families
The New Careers
Our Career and Work-Life Model
2. The Self-Assessment Process
The Basic Areas of Self-Assessment
Reflecting on the Past
Identity as a Core Competence
Clarifying Your Values
Understanding Your Interests and Passions
Lifestyle
Understanding Life Goals and Personal Vision
Skills Assessment
Summary
3. Integrating Your Self-Assessment and Developing Implications
Integrating Your Self-Assessment
Developing Themes from Your Data
Step 1: Coding Your Data
Step 2: Grouping Your Data
Step 3: Assigning Tentative Themes step 4: Constructing the Final Themes With Supporting Data
Sample Themes
Developing Career and Work-Life Implications
Summary
4. Finding Ideal Work
Job Loss
Assessing the Labor Market
Identifying the Right Opportunities for You
Job Search Tools
References
Résumés
Starting a Professional Portfolio
Cover Letters
Conducting the Job Search
Networking and the Job Search
Informational Interviews
Guidelines for Conducting an Informational Interview
Questions to Ask
Identifying the Ideal Employer
Special Challenges and Tips for International Students Who Want to Work in the United States
Career Decision-Making
Summary
5. Career Development Strategies
Organizational Career Paths
From Career Ladders to Career Lattices
Vertical Careers and Organizational Advancement
Managing Up
Alternative Career Paths-Salzman's Typology
Backtrackers
Plateauers
Career Shifters
Self-Employers
Urban Escapees
The Portfolio Career
Ongoing Development
Organizational Career Systems
International Assignments
Financial Considerations
Summary
6. Work and Family
Men and Women, Families and Work
Dual-Career Couples
Dual-Career Families
Sources of Stress
Role Conflict
Summary
7. Workplace Flexibility
Flexible Work Arrangements
Flextime
Compressed Work Week
Part-Time and Reduced-Load Work
Job Sharing
Telecommuting
Leaves
Sabbaticals
Other Elements of the Family-Friendly Workplace
The Family-Friendly Workplace Culture
The Dark Side of Flexible Work Arrangements
Summary
8. Career Development Over the Lifespan
Lifespan Development: Are Career and Life Stages Still Relevant Today?
Adult Life Stages
Gender and Life Stages
A New Model for Middle and Later Years: Learning Cycles
The Second (or Third or Fourth) Career
Protean Career and Older Workers
How Do We Tap the Potential of Older Workers?
Use Developmental Relationships
Opt for New and Varied Job Experience
Improve Person—Job Brokering
Use Information Technology
Retirement
How Do I Want to Design My Life for the Thir Phase?
Financial Planning and Careers in Later Life
Summarizing Careers Over the Lifespan
Book Summary
Appendix: Standards of Excellence Index
Bibliography
Index
About the Authors

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