Caribbean Interests Of The United States [NOOK Book]

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES WITH THE BRITISH WEST INDIES THE LARGER ISLANDS The most numerous and widely scattered of all the European colonies in the Caribbean are the possessions of Great Britain. Two outposts on ...
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Caribbean Interests Of The United States

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
CHAPTER III RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES WITH THE BRITISH WEST INDIES THE LARGER ISLANDS The most numerous and widely scattered of all the European colonies in the Caribbean are the possessions of Great Britain. Two outposts on the mainland, one in South and one in Central America, constitute 88.7 per cent. of the superficial area of these holdings, but in historical importance and in present economic and political significance these are outdistanced by the islands which stretch in a great bow over 1,900 miles of sea from Trinidad at the mouth of the Orinoco to the Bahamas off the coast of Florida. In the days of sailing ships these islands were a valuable line of outposts from which British commerce could be protected. They were also before the days of beet sugar a great source of supply for the sugar of Europe. Their present importance is relatively less. The abolition of slavery has, in some, made the problem of the labor supply acute, and capital, with the rise of substitutes for cane sugar, has found them less profitable fields for investment. Until recently, indeed, their future seemed anything but bright. The total area of the British Caribbean colonies is111,425 square miles;1 90,277 square miles in British Guiana, 8,598 in British Honduras, 4,450 in Jamaica and 8,200 in the smaller islands. The largest island, Jamaica, is about four-tenths the size of Haiti. Comparisons of their trade development with that of their neighbors are deceptive for many reasons, chiefly because of the varying degrees of order in the different communities. Counting in only the islands, though their area is only 12,650 square miles compared to 18,- 045 square miles in the Dominican Republic, their foreign trade is still five times that of the Republic. On the other hand, they mak...
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940024121382
  • Publisher: D. Appleton And Company
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1929 volume
  • File size: 595 KB

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CHAPTER III RELATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES WITH THE BRITISH WEST INDIES THE LARGER ISLANDS The most numerous and widely scattered of all the European colonies in the Caribbean are the possessions of Great Britain. Two outposts on the mainland, one in South and one in Central America, constitute 88.7 per cent. of the superficial area of these holdings, but in historical importance and in present economic and political significance these are outdistanced by the islands which stretch in a great bow over 1,900 miles of sea from Trinidad at the mouth of the Orinoco to the Bahamas off the coast of Florida. In the days of sailing ships these islands were a valuable line of outposts from which British commerce could be protected. They were also before the days of beet sugar a great source of supply for the sugar of Europe. Their present importance is relatively less. The abolition of slavery has, in some, made the problem of the labor supply acute, and capital, with the rise of substitutes for cane sugar, has found them less profitable fields for investment. Until recently, indeed, their future seemed anything but bright. The total area of the British Caribbean colonies is111,425 square miles;1 90,277 square miles in British Guiana, 8,598 in British Honduras, 4,450 in Jamaica and 8,200 in the smaller islands. The largest island, Jamaica, is about four-tenths the size of Haiti. Comparisons of their trade development with that of their neighbors are deceptive for many reasons, chiefly because of the varying degrees of order in the different communities. Counting in only the islands, though their area is only 12,650 square miles compared to 18,- 045 square miles in the Dominican Republic,their foreign trade is still five times that of the Republic. On the other hand, they mak...
Read More Show Less

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