Carl Linnaeus: Father of Classification

Carl Linnaeus: Father of Classification

by Margaret Jean Anderson
     
 

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The scientific term for human beings is Homo sapiens. In Latin, Homo means "man" and sapiens means "wise." Although closely related, dogs and wolves are separate species. Therefore, dogs are called Canis familiaris and wolves are called Canis lupus. This system for classifying living things was developed by the Swedish scientist Carl Linnaeus almost 300 years ago and…  See more details below

Overview

The scientific term for human beings is Homo sapiens. In Latin, Homo means "man" and sapiens means "wise." Although closely related, dogs and wolves are separate species. Therefore, dogs are called Canis familiaris and wolves are called Canis lupus. This system for classifying living things was developed by the Swedish scientist Carl Linnaeus almost 300 years ago and is still used by scientists today.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Paula K. Zeller
In the eighteenth century, Carl Linnaeus devised a classification system for living things that is still in use today. This passionate scientist and prolific writer is the subject of a revised biography in the "Great Minds of Science" series. As a young boy in Sweden, Linnaeus demonstrated an intense interest in plants that transcended his academic studies and steered him toward botany and medicine, despite his parents' wish that he become a pastor like his father and grandfather. Linnaeus spent many hours reading books about plants and collecting specimens, and he was adept at finding benefactors who enabled him to make a living doing what he loved best. This book focuses on Linnaeus's academic and scientific accomplishments, his travels, and his writings. Margaret J. Anderson demonstrates her own enthusiasm for her subject with explanations of Linnaeus's classification and naming systems, including an overview of scientists from whom Linnaeus drew inspiration and those who followed in his path. Other features of the book include captioned color illustrations, a pronunciation guide to Swedish names, plant classification activities, a chronology, chapter notes, a glossary, lists of recommended books and websites, and an index. Although the book has an old-fashioned look and feel, the relevance of Linnaeus' work shines through. Reviewer: Paula K. Zeller
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 4-8Well organized and clearly written, although at times stilted, this biography of the developer of binomial nomenclature for classifying plants and animals has easy-to-read, open pages with large print and wide margins. Black-and-white illustrations include portraits of the Linnaeus family and photographs of their homes and the universities in which this Swedish scientist taught and did his research. The narrative includes many anecdotes about his family and experiences with people who influenced his life and work. Much of the book is devoted to his many scientific expeditions collecting and studying plant and animal life and to his teaching career. Simple plant experiments and some examples of Linnaeus's classification system are included. This sound chronological study provides useful report material in a rather bland package.Cynthia M. Sturgis, Ledding Library, Milwaukee, OR
Kirkus Reviews
Budding scientists will surely draw inspiration from this biography of Linnaeus, whom Anderson dubs "the greatest botanist of all time." Linnaeus and his world—18th-century Sweden—may seem far removed from most middle-graders' experiences, but Anderson creates a dramatic narrative fully capable of keeping readers enthralled. The elements of Linnaeus's life are used to maximum effect: At nine he was told that he was a hopeless student; as a young man, he perfected his own system of binomial nomenclature used to classify plant life. Throughout the story, Anderson shows how the personal side of Linnaeus's life affected his profession: Although he was beset by financial problems for years, he succeeded as an explorer and scientist, eventually achieving fame and wealth as a college professor with a family of his own. The portrait is accurately rendered, and although Linnaeus is imperfect by 20th-century standards—refusing to educate his daughters and remaining distant from his wife—Anderson finds in his life an upbeat story of a man achieving his dreams.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780766030091
Publisher:
Enslow Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date:
05/01/2009
Series:
Great Minds of Science Series
Edition description:
Revised
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

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