Carl the Frog

( 1 )

Overview

Carl is a frog in search of a friend - but his outlandishly long tongue (and even larger appetite!) always sabotages his plans. An unsuspecting gnat tries to show young Carl how to use his tongue - but thawoolp! He ends up as Carl's first meal. Then a rambunctious horsefly tries to engage Carl in a game of cards - but thawoolp! He meets the same fate as the gnat. Even sweet Miss Fish tries to give Carl a chance - only to become the latest course in Carl's all-he-can-eat buffet. When a wise old kingfisher sets his...

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Overview

Carl is a frog in search of a friend - but his outlandishly long tongue (and even larger appetite!) always sabotages his plans. An unsuspecting gnat tries to show young Carl how to use his tongue - but thawoolp! He ends up as Carl's first meal. Then a rambunctious horsefly tries to engage Carl in a game of cards - but thawoolp! He meets the same fate as the gnat. Even sweet Miss Fish tries to give Carl a chance - only to become the latest course in Carl's all-he-can-eat buffet. When a wise old kingfisher sets his sights on Carl as his next meal, Carl finally learns to change his ways. The true test comes when a small ant tries to befriend the hungry frog. Carl musters all of his willpower and redefines the phrase "tongue tied" to keep himself from snacking on the ant, and in the process makes the best friend he could ever hope to have. This rollicking romp will keep families giggling while imparting the friendly lesson that it's better to have friends than to eat them!

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Suzanna E. Henshon
In this creative journey into the psyche of a frog, David Weiss has a distinct beginning, "Dots. Lots and lots of dots." Carl starts his life as a mere dot, an egg that quickly transforms into a tadpole. Soon Carl is swimming in circles, and he loves to test his shooting, snack-catching tongue. A few weeks later, he changes into a frog. What could be more exciting than leaping into a new life? Carl becomes a frog who loves to stretch his tongue and eat, even if it means swallowing his friends: Mr. Gnat, the horsefly, and the lovely minnow. At the end of the day, Carl's stomach is filled but he feels incredibly lonely. "I shall never eat another friend," he vows. Can a hungry frog control his leaping tongue? Then Carl has a close encounter with a clever kingfisher—and suddenly he realizes how unpleasant it can feel to be eaten. Suddenly he flings his tongue toward a bus—and ends up taking a wild ride. After tumbling to the ground, Carl is approached by an ant. He tries desperately not to eat this new friend, and is invited to a picnic. While attending the picnic, Carl learns it is far more pleasant to eat with friends (than to eat friends). In this comedic and humorous tale, David Weiss brings characters to life with vivid detail and personality; the illustrations serve as a wonderful backdrop to a memorable story. Parents and children will enjoy this enchanting story. Reviewer: Suzanna E. Henshon, Ph.D.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781600103384
  • Publisher: Idea & Design Works, LLC
  • Publication date: 2/25/2009
  • Pages: 40
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 11.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    What do frogs eat?

    If you were a frog and saw a gnat, what would you want to do with the gnat? Play with him or eat him? Carl goes from being an egg to being a tadpole to being a frog. He hops to the nearest tree to stretch his tongue. A friendly gnat encourages him in stretching his tongue, but then Carl feels hungry. After eating the gnat, he no longer feels hungry, but now he feels lonely. He plays cards with a friendly horsefly, but then he begins to feel hungry again. And there is the friendly fish who wants to swim with him. However, when a not-so-friendly kingfisher comes along and acts as if he is going to eat Carl, the frog learns an important lesson. In addition to the incidental information about the life cycle of a frog, children will see the valuable message from David N. Weiss's humorous story and Peter Whitehead's clever illustrations that they should never mistreat or harm their friends--or they may end up with no one to play with! Toddlers, preschoolers, and early readers will find Carl the Frog full of both laughs and a little thought-provoking.

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