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Carlisle vs. Army

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A stunning work of narrative nonfiction, Carlisle vs. Army recounts the fateful 1912 gridiron clash that pitted Jim Thorpe, one of America's finest athletes, against Dwight D. Eisenhower, the man who would become one of the nation's greatest heroes. But beyond telling the tale of an epic afternoon whose reverberations would be felt for generations, Lars Anderson also reveals the broader social and historical context of the match, lending it his unique perspectives on sports and culture at the dawn of the ...
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Overview

A stunning work of narrative nonfiction, Carlisle vs. Army recounts the fateful 1912 gridiron clash that pitted Jim Thorpe, one of America's finest athletes, against Dwight D. Eisenhower, the man who would become one of the nation's greatest heroes. But beyond telling the tale of an epic afternoon whose reverberations would be felt for generations, Lars Anderson also reveals the broader social and historical context of the match, lending it his unique perspectives on sports and culture at the dawn of the twentieth century.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781410403865
  • Publisher: Gale Group
  • Publication date: 1/22/2008
  • Series: Thorndike Nonfiction Ser.
  • Edition description: Large Print Edition
  • Pages: 617
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Table of Contents

The Thrill of Possibility     13
Shot Like Buffalo     25
Pop Learns from Ma     45
The Trickiest Play     87
What an Indian Can Do     157
There's Just No Future in the Army     211
He is Certainly a Wild Indian     261
A Couple of Well-Paid Amateurs     331
A Brutal, Savage, Murderous Sport     367
Beast Barracks and a Beast on the Field     389
A Real American if There Ever was One     445
Chief Thorpe and the Huge Kansan     495
The Clash of Heroes     545
The Dead Indian and Another Wounded Knee     577
Epilogue: The Ghosts of Carlisle     609
Acknowledgments     625
A note on Sources     629
Notes     631
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2008

    Poor Research

    Don't be fooled by the media blitz behind this book and the companion book by Sally Jenkins ('The Real All Americans'). It is filled with serious errors and is the product of poor, second hand, research. The 'Long Knives' metaphor around which this book is built is just plain false. Jenkins picked that up from Babe Weyand's first book. He, in turn picked it up from none other than the less than believable 1940-50's sportscaster Bill Stern who included it in a 1948 ghost written book for juvenile readers without single authoritative source behind it. In a lengthy series of correspondence and ghost written articles Warner never mentions the Long Knives pep talk once. Nor do authoritative and contemporaneous (with Warner) football historians such as Allison Danzig and Tim Cohane. As to the double wing, Warner's correspondence, newspaper articles and interviews reveal that the Warner was using the single wing in 1906 and the double wing in 1910. Even Army in this game used the single wing as were many other teams in the Country. The Indians didn't consider Army very important. The 'Big Four' (Harvard, Penn, Princeton and Yale) were far more important to Carlisle and Warner than Army. As to Ike. He was a bit player on a terrible 'D' who was knocked out of the game when, comic book like, he and his teammate Charley Benedict collided headon in a missed attempt to 'high low' Thorpe in the 3d quarter. If the 'Long Knives' metaphor can be distilled into one game it is the 1905 game between Carlisle and the Cadets at West Point - seven years closer to Wounded Knee - and a game far more important on the national stage than the 1912 game. It took a special act of the War Department to be played at all. Jenkins doesn't even mention it. The Indians won that game too. Want more? See my 'There Were No Oysters - The Truth About the 1912 Army vs. Carlisle Game' which I wrote earlier this year in response to Jenkins' and Lars Anderson's companion book about the 1912 game.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2008

    A storty for American history buffs and football fans

    The book examines the plight, reputation, and confusion of identity for the American Indians following the massacre at Wounded Knee. The examination is made through the story of Jim Thorpe, Pop Warner and football at the Carlisle Indian school. The story culminates with a football showdown with the Army team and one of their most famous cadets, Dwight Eisenhower. Especially interesting is the story of college football in its eary days, its brutality, and how rule changes saved the game from being banned

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