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Carmen
     

Carmen

5.0 1
by Prosper Merimee
 

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Carmen was inspired by a story she told him on his visit to Spain in 1830. He said, "It was about that ruffian from Málaga who had killed his mistress, who consecrated herself exclusively to the public. [...] As I have been studying the Gypsies for some time, I have made my heroine a Gypsy."

Overview

Carmen was inspired by a story she told him on his visit to Spain in 1830. He said, "It was about that ruffian from Málaga who had killed his mistress, who consecrated herself exclusively to the public. [...] As I have been studying the Gypsies for some time, I have made my heroine a Gypsy."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781934648124
Publisher:
Norilana Books
Publication date:
09/16/2007
Pages:
108
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.38(d)

Meet the Author

Prosper Mérimée was born into a family of artists in Paris in 1803. He studied law and languages in school, and in 1825, he published his first book, Le Théâtre de Clara Gazul—a purported translation of plays written by a Spanish actress and translated by one Joseph L’Estrange. He followed this up with another “translation” of a selection of folk ballads under the title La Guzla. No less a personage than Pushkin was convinced, quoting a few of the ballads in his own work. In 1834, Mérimée was appointed inspector-general of historical monuments, a job for which he was uniquely suited with his linguistic and scholarly skills. He successfully led a protest movement to save the medieval walled city of Carcassonne from destruction and, with his friend George Sand, rediscovered the Lady and the Unicorn tapestries lying neglected in a provincial château. On a journey to Spain he became friendly with the Countess of Montijo, whose daughter Eugénie would marry Napeleon III. When the emperor acceded to the throne, Mérimée was made a senator. His correspondence with such figures as Stendhal and Anthony Panizzi, the librarian of the British Museum, was legendary for its wit and intelligence, and Mérimée’s novellas on historical and supernatural themes, including Colomba and La Vénus D’Ille, are some of the finest of the romantic era. He died in 1870 in Cannes.

George Burnham Ives (1856
1930) also translated the work of George Sand and Honoré de Balzac.

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