Carnival of Death, the: A Case of Killer Drugs and Cold-blooded Murder on the Midway

Carnival of Death, the: A Case of Killer Drugs and Cold-blooded Murder on the Midway

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by L. Ron Hubbard
     
 

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In the movie The Big Sleep, Bogart as Philip Marlowe follows a trail of decadence and murder on the dark side of L.A. But even that pales in comparison to the freak show found by undercover U.S. narcotics agent Bob Clark . . . in The Carnival of Death. Clark’s investigation begins with cocaine and leads to two headless corpses. Who is behind the slaughter?… See more details below

Overview


In the movie The Big Sleep, Bogart as Philip Marlowe follows a trail of decadence and murder on the dark side of L.A. But even that pales in comparison to the freak show found by undercover U.S. narcotics agent Bob Clark . . . in The Carnival of Death. Clark’s investigation begins with cocaine and leads to two headless corpses. Who is behind the slaughter? There are plenty of distractions—bright lights and beautiful girls—but Clark better find the murderers fast. Because the next head that rolls could be his own.

In 1934, while living in New York, the heart of the publishing industry, Hubbard struck up a friendship with the city’s medical examiner—a relationship that started his education in undetectable crime and provided him with authoritative clinical background for his detective stories.

Also includes the mystery The Death Flyer, in which a man and woman find themselves trapped on a ghost train and bound for a deadly crash . . . unless they can find a way to derail fate and cheat death—on the fly.

“Roars to life.”
—Library Journal

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Fans of purple pulp prose will welcome this Hubbard novella, which first appeared in the November 1934 issue of Popular Detective magazine. The lurid opening sentence sets the tone: "Rising to a crescendo of stark horror, a scream of death hacked through the gaiety of the night." Bob Clark, carnival detective for Shreve's Mammoth Carnival but actually a covert operative for the U.S. Treasury Department, suspects someone is using the carnival as a cover for dope-trafficking. While Clark's cover is ostensibly solid, he has still been the subject of multiple attempts on his life. Against this background, the investigator must track four cannibals who escaped from their restraints and who are the logical people responsible for the decapitation murder of their barker. The climax even features a showdown in a house of mirrors. A short story, "The Death Flyer," about violence onboard a train, helps fill up this slim volume. (Mar.)
From the Publisher

"Originally written in November of 1934, the story revolves around Bob Clark, an undercover US Treasury agent who, in the course of an investigation at a carnival, stumbles upon a series of headless corpses and now must solve the murders. But a local drug ring and four escaped headhunters have other plans." —PR Log

“Fans of purple pulp prose will welcome this Hubbard novella, which first appeared in the November 1934 issue of Popular Detective magazine. The lurid opening sentence sets the tone: "Rising to a crescendo of stark horror, a scream of death hacked through the gaiety of the night." Bob Clark, carnival detective for Shreve's Mammoth Carnival but actually a covert operative for the U.S. Treasury Department, suspects someone is using the carnival as a cover for dope-trafficking. While Clark's cover is ostensibly solid, he has still been the subject of multiple attempts on his life. Against this background, the investigator must track four cannibals who escaped from their restraints and who are the logical people responsible for the decapitation murder of their barker. The climax even features a showdown in a house of mirrors. A short story, "The Death Flyer," about violence onboard a train, helps fill up this slim volume.” —Publishers Weekly

Library Journal
Working undercover at a carnival to bust a suspected drug ring, U.S. narcotics agent Bob Clark stumbles onto a series of headless corpses. All signs point to the carnival's biggest draw, four "ferocious African headhunters" imported and manacled for display to scare American audiences, but Clark chases another theory. Originally published in the November 1934 issue of Popular Detective, this horror/mystery tale roars to life through the kaleidoscopic auditory fabric of its carnival setting. R.F. Daley provides the overall narration as well as voices a minor character; Jim Meskimen, Ryan Cota, Tait Ruppert, Lori Jablons, and Nick Baybak render the remaining 14. Though the plot kicks off right away, the production increasingly gains traction as more of the cast chime in to layer the tale. Recommended. [Includes the ghost story "The Death Flyer" (1936).—Ed.]

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781592122479
Publisher:
Galaxy Press, LLC
Publication date:
02/21/2011
Series:
Stories from the Golden Age
Pages:
136
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
790L (what's this?)

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