Carnivore Conservation

Carnivore Conservation

by John L. Gittleman
     
 

ISBN-10: 052166232X

ISBN-13: 9780521662321

Pub. Date: 06/28/2001

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Because carnivores are at the top of the food chain, it is often argued that protecting them will afford adequate protection to other taxa as well. In the past ten years, theoretical and empirical studies on carnivores have developed very quickly. This volume reviews and summarizes the current state of the field, describes limitations and opportunities for carnivore…  See more details below

Overview

Because carnivores are at the top of the food chain, it is often argued that protecting them will afford adequate protection to other taxa as well. In the past ten years, theoretical and empirical studies on carnivores have developed very quickly. This volume reviews and summarizes the current state of the field, describes limitations and opportunities for carnivore conservation, and offers a conceptual framework for future research and applied management. It will be of interest to students and researchers of conservation biology, mammalogy, animal behavior, ecology, and evolution.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521662321
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
06/28/2001
Series:
Conservation Biology Series, #5
Pages:
690
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 1.57(d)

Table of Contents

1. Why 'carnivore conservation'? John L. Gittleman, Stephan M. Funk, David W. MacDonald and Robert K. Wayne; Part I. Problems: 2. Past and future carnivore extinctions: a phylogenetic principle Andy Purvis, Georgina M. Mace and John L. Gittleman; 3. Interspecific competition and the population biology of extinction-prone carnivores Scott Creel, Göran Spong and Nancy Creel; 4. Strategies for carnivore conservation: lessons from contemporary extinctions Rosie Woodroffe; 5. Alien carnivores: unwelcome experiments in ecological theory David W. Macdonald and Michael D. Thom; 6. Carnivore introductions and invasions: their success and management options Luigi Boitani; 7. Hybridization and conservation of carnivores Robert K. Wayne and David M. Brown; 8. Carnivore demography and the consequences of changes in prey availability Todd K. Fuller and Paul R. Sievert; 9. Human-carnivore interactions: adopting proactive strategies for complex problems Marc Bekoff; 10. The control, exploitation and conservation of carnivores Warren E. Johnson, Eduardo Eizirik and Gina M. Lento; Part II. Some Approaches and Solutions: 11. Interdisciplinary problem solving in carnivore conservation: an introduction Tim W. Clark, David Mattson, Richard P. Reading and Brian J. Miller; 12. Assessment of carnivore reintroductions Urs Breitenmoser, Christine Breitenmoser-Würsten, Ludwig N. Carbyn and Stephan M. Funk; 13. Interactions between carnivores and local communities: conflict or co-existence? Claudio Sillero-Zubiri and Karen Laurenson; 14. New methods for obtaining and analyzing genetic data from free-ranging carnivores Pierre Taberlet, Gordon Luikart and Eli Geffen; 15. Applications of genetic concepts and molecular methods to carnivore conservation Warren E. Johnson, Eduardo Eizirik, Melody Roelke-Parker and Stephen J. O'Brien; 16. Role of reproductive sciences in carnivore conservation David E. Wildt, JoGayle Howard and Janine Brown; 17. Monitoring of terrestrial carnivore populations Eric M. Gese; Part III. Prospects for Research and Conservation: 18. Changing landscapes: consequences for carnivores Melvin E. Sunquist and Fiona Sunquist; 19. Behavior of carnivores in exploited and controlled populations Laurence G. Frank and Rosie Woodroffe; 20. The role of disease in carnivore ecology and conservation Stephan M. Funk, Christine V. Fiorello, Sarah Cleaveland and Matthew E. Gompper; 21. Geographic priorities for carnivore conservation in Africa M. G. L. Mills, Stephanie Freitag and Albert van Jaarsveld; 22. Estimating interpopulation dispersal rates Peter Waser, Curtis Strobeck and David Paetkau; 23. Setting priorities for carnivore conservation: what makes carnivores different? Joshua R. Ginsberg; 24. Conclusions: carnivore conservation: science, compromise and tough choices David W. Macdonald.

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