The Carnivorous Carnival: Book the Ninth (A Series of Unfortunate Events)

( 423 )

Overview

Everybody loves a carnival! Who can fail to delight in the colourful people, the unworldly spectacle, the fabulous freaks?

A carnival is a place for good family fun - as long as one has a family, that is. For the Baudelaire orphans, their time at the carnival turns out to be yet another episode in a now unbearable series of unfortunate events. In fact, in this appalling ninth instalment in Lemony Snicket's serial, the siblings must confront a terrible lie, a caravan, and Chabo ...

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A Series of Unfortunate Events #9: The Carnivorous Carnival

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Overview

Everybody loves a carnival! Who can fail to delight in the colourful people, the unworldly spectacle, the fabulous freaks?

A carnival is a place for good family fun - as long as one has a family, that is. For the Baudelaire orphans, their time at the carnival turns out to be yet another episode in a now unbearable series of unfortunate events. In fact, in this appalling ninth instalment in Lemony Snicket's serial, the siblings must confront a terrible lie, a caravan, and Chabo the wolf baby. With millions of readers worldwide, and the Baudelaire's fate turning from unpleasant to unseemly, it is clear that Lemony Snicket has taken nearly all the fun out of children's books.

Ages 10+

On the run as suspected murderers, the unlucky Baudelaire orphans find themselves trapped in the Caligari Carnival, where they must masquerade as freaks in order to hide from the evil Count Olaf.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
For fans of that slippery author Lemony Snicket, Book the Ninth is here, and it's completely (but wonderfully) dreadful.

When the Baudelaire Orphans finally make it out of Count Olaf's car trunk (from Book the Eighth), they wind up at the horribly perilous Caligari Carnival. Trying to avoid capture but desperate to find out more information about a possible surviving parent, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny pose as circus freaks, only to be humiliated in front of visitors and pushed to the brink of consumption by lions. Fortunately, though, the three discover a few surprises about fortune-telling Madame Lulu, who offers a faint clue about V.F.D. and even the Snicket family itself.

Snicket fans will be in Ninth Heaven. Again, it's a sad state of affairs for the Baudelaires, but there are some fascinating morsels of hope, plus a few small surprises that might help link it all together. With riveting suspense, wicked intentions, and gullible freaks, The Carnivorous Carnival is definitely an installment that can't be missed. Matt Warner

Publishers Weekly
In the ninth title in Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, The Carnivorous Carnival, the Baudelaire siblings are falsely accused of murder. On the run from Count Olaf (the real killer), the three disguise themselves in Madame Lulu's House of Freaks; Violet and Klaus masquerade as the two-headed Beverly/Elliot; Sunny poses as Chabo the Wolf Baby. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-Tim Curry (The Rocky Horror Picture Show, The Pirates of Penzance) has the perfect, mysterious voice for this reading of Lemony Snicket's book (HarperCollins, 2002). The plot, as in the other eight titles in the series, centers around the three orphaned Baudelaire children and their avoidance of Count Olaf, who is presumably trying to obtain their deceased parents' fortune. The children find their woeful refuge in a carnival, becoming more involved than any of them had planned. Madame Lulu's House of Freaks welcomes the children as a two-headed freak (Violet and Klaus) and Chabo, the Wolf Baby (Sunny). Will the orphans finally find out the secret meaning of the initials VFD? Will they discover something about their parents and the fire that made them orphans? The Carniverous Carnival takes listeners one step closer to solving the series' mysteries. Tim Curry's sinister renditions of Snicket's plottings will delight, but this title will be more thoroughly enjoyed by those who have experienced the other eight episodes. Don't hesitate to purchase this if Lemony Snicket is popular in any form with your patrons.-Kirsten Martindale, Buford Academy, GA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780064410120
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/29/2002
  • Series: A Series of Unfortunate Events , #9
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 50,334
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 1120L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 1.09 (d)

Meet the Author

Lemony Snicket

Lemony Snicket is often despondent, mostly about his published research, which includes A Series of Unfortunate Events and The Composer Is Dead.

Brett Helquist's celebrated art has graced books from the charming Roger, The Jolly Pirate, to the alarming New York Times bestselling A Series of Unfortunate Events, to the cozy E. B. White Read-Aloud Award finalist bedtime for bear. He lives with his family in Brooklyn, New York.

Michael Kupperman has done many illustrations for such publications as Fortune, The New Yorker, and The New York Times. He frequently writes scripts for DC Comics. This is his first book.

Biography

As the saying goes, all good things must come to an end -- and, in the case of Lemony Snicket, all unfortunate things must come to an end, too. After seven years and thirteen episodes, the much beloved A Series of Unfortunate Events books are drawing to a close. At least, that's what Snicket's "handler" Daniel Handler says.

But before getting to what promises to be "the most unfortunate event of all," it is first necessary to familiarize oneself with the mysterious man who created a mega-selling series of children's novels pivoting on the premise of placing young people in peril. According to his autobiography Lemony Snicket: the Unauthorized Autobiography, Snicket "grew up near the sea and currently lives beneath it. To his horror and dismay, he has no wife or children, only enemies, associates, and the occasional loyal manservant. His trial has been delayed, so he is free to continue researching and recording the tragic tales of the Baudelaire orphans." Hmmm. Perhaps an autobiography purporting that it may or may not be true isn't the best place to begin.

Instead, let us focus on Daniel Handler, the man who might actually be responsible for composing the Series of Unfortunate Events books according to certain skeptics (which include Handler, himself). Daniel Handler has been asked many times why anyone would want to make a career of chronicling the ghastly trials of a trio of ill-fated orphans. "When I was young, my favorite stories were not the sort of children's books that are constantly being thrust at you when you're little," he explained in an audio essay on Barnes & Noble.com. "I didn't like books where people played on a sports team and won a bunch of games, or went to summer camp and had a wonderful time. I really liked a book where a witch might cut a child's head off or a pack of angry dogs might burst through a door and terrorize a family. So, I guess it should not be surprising that when I turned to children's literature I tried to think of all sorts of interesting things to happen to small children, and all of these things were pretty dreadful."

Handler has long made it clear that his wildly popular series would be limited to thirteen installments. The Penultimate Peril: Book the Twelfth finds the much-beleaguered Baudelaire orphans "enjoying" a family vacation at a menacing hotel, and Handler is wrapping up his saga with The End: Book the Thirteenth, which promises to tie up all remaining threads in the story in an undoubtedly exciting manner.

However, the conclusion of his series is no indication that Handler plans on bringing his writing career to an end. He has also written adult-targeted titles under his own name, including his latest, Adverbs: A Novel. This exploration of love, which Publishers Weekly deemed "lovely" and "lilting," may forgo the trademark Lemony Snicket wry morbidity, but Handler ensures readers that the book isn't without its own unfortunate events. "It's a fairly miserable story, as any story about love will be," he says. "People try to find love -- some of them find it, some of them don't, some of them have an unhappy time even if they do find it -- but it is considerably more cheerful than any of my so-called children's books."

Good To Know

Daniel Handler has a potentially embarrassing confession to make: he is an avowed accordion player. Handler says that when he told his parents about his decidedly uncool musical pursuits, they reacted "as if I had taken up heroin."

His interest in music does not end with the accordion. Close friend and leader of indie-rock band The Magnetic Fields Steven Merritt has written an original song for each audio book version of the Series of Unfortunate Events books. Merritt and Handler will be releasing a CD of all 13 "dreadful" songs when the final installment of the series is published in late 2006. Handler also lent his accordion-laying talents to The Magnetic Fields' critically acclaimed album 69 Love Songs.

Handler's persistence may rival that of the never-say-die Baudelaire orphans. His first novel, The Basic Eight, was rejected 37 times before it was finally published.

He enjoys the work of novelist Haruki Murakami so much that Handler devoted an entire essay to the subject in the plainly and guilelessly entitled Village Voice review, "I Love Murakami."

According to a former high school classmate writing in the local paper, Handler was "voted not only Class Clown, but also Best Actor, Chatterbox, and Teacher's Pet."

A few fun facts from our interview with Handler:

"I can cook anything."

"I know one very good card trick."

"I auditioned for an enormous role in the film Gigli."

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    1. Also Known As:
      In some parts, people get to know him through his handler, Daniel Handler.
    2. Hometown:
      Snicket is something of a nomad. Handler lives in San Francisco, California.
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 28, 1970
    2. Place of Birth:
      Handler was born in San Francisco in 1970, and says Snicket's family has roots in a land that's now underwater.
    1. Education:
      Handler is a 1992 graduate of Wesleyan University in Connecticut.
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Series of Unfortunate Events #9


By Lemony Snicket

HarperCollins Publishers

Copyright ©2002 Lemony Snicket
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0064410129

Chapter One

When my workday is over, and I have closed my notebook, hidden my pen, and sawed holes in my rented canoe so that it cannot be found, I often like to spend the evening in conversation with my few surviving friends. Sometimes we discuss literature. Sometimes we discuss the people who are trying to destroy us, and if there is any hope of escaping from them. And sometimes we discuss frightening and troublesome animals that might be nearby, and this topic always leads to much disagreement over which part of a frightening and troublesome beast is the most frightening and troublesome. Some say the teeth of the beast, because teeth are used for eating children, and often their parents, and gnawing their bones. Some say the claws of the beast, because claws are used for ripping things to shreds. And some say the hair of the beast, because hair can make allergic people sneeze.

But I always insist that the most frightening part of any beast is its belly, for the simple reason that if you are seeing the belly of the beast it means you have already seen the teeth of the beast and the claws of the beast and even the hair of the beast, and now you are trapped and there is probably no hope for you. For this reason, the phrase "in the belly of the beast" has become anexpression which means "inside some terrible place with little chance of escaping safely," and it is not an expression one should look forward to using.

Im sorry to tell you that this book will use the expression "the belly of the beast" three times before it is over, not counting all of the times I have already used "the belly of the beast" in order to warn you of all the times "the belly of the beast" will appear. Three times over the course of this story, characters will be inside some terrible place with little chance of escaping safely, and for that reason I would put this book down and escape safely yourself, because this woeful story is so very dark and wretched and damp that the experience of reading it will make you feel as if you are in the belly of the beast, and that time doesn't count either.

The Baudelaire orphans were in the belly of the beast - that is, in the dark and cramped trunk of a long, black automobile. Unless you are a small, portable object, you probably prefer to sit in a seat when you are traveling by automobile, so you can lean back against the upholstery, look out the window at the scenery going by, and feel safe and secure with a seat belt fastened low and tight across your lap. But the Baudelaires could not lean back, and their bodies were aching from squishing up against one another for several hours. They had no window to look out of, only a few bullet holes in the trunk made from some violent encounter I have not found the courage to research. And they felt anything but safe and secure as they thought about the other passengers in the car, and tried to imagine where they were going.

The driver of the automobile was a man named Count Olaf, a wicked person with one eyebrow instead of two and a greedy desire for money instead of respect for other people. The Baudelaires had first met Count Olaf after receiving the news that their parents had been killed in a terrible fire, and had soon discovered he was only interested in the enormous fortune their mother and father had left behind. With unceasing determination - a phrase which here means "no matter where the three children went" - Count Olaf had pursued them, trying one dastardly technique after another to get his hands on their fortune. So far he had been unsuccessful, although he'd had plenty of help from his girlfriend, Esmi Squalor - an equally wicked, if more fashionable, person who was now sitting beside him in the front seat of the automobile - and an assortment of assistants, including a bald man with an enormous nose, two women who liked to wear white powder all over their faces, and a nasty man who had hooks instead of hands. All of these people were sitting in the back of the automobile, where the children could sometimes hear them speaking over the roar of the engine and the sounds of the road.

One would think, with such a wretched crew as traveling companions, that the Baudelaire siblings would have found some other way to travel rather than sneaking into the trunk, but the three children had been fleeing from circumstances even more frightening and dangerous than Olaf and his assistants and there had been no time to be choosy. But as their journey wore on, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny grew more and more worried about their situation. The sunlight coming in through the bullet holes faded to evening, and the road beneath them turned bumpy and rough, and the Baudelaire orphans tried to imagine where it was they were going and what would happen when they got there. "Are we there yet?" The voice of the hook-handed man broke a long silence. "I told you not to ask me that anymore," replied Olaf with a snarl. "We'll get there when we get there, and that is that."

"Could we possibly make a short stop?" asked one of the white-faced women. "I noticed a sign for a rest station in a few miles."

"We don't have time to stop anywhere," Olaf said sharply. "If you needed to use the bathroom, you should have gone before we left."

"But the hospital was on fire," the woman whined.

"Yes, let's stop," said the bald man. "We haven't had anything to eat since lunch, and my stomach is grumbling."

"We can't stop," Esmi said. "There are no restaurants out here in the hinterlands that are in."



Continues...


Excerpted from Series of Unfortunate Events #9 by Lemony Snicket Copyright ©2002 by Lemony Snicket. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 423 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(344)

4 Star

(51)

3 Star

(18)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(8)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 425 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2011

    Great book

    This was a great book!! I have been reading this series and I absolutely love it!!!! I was in tthe middle of reading another book when I started it, and I completly forgot that I was reading it untill I fineshed this book. This book is a fantastic addition to "A Series Of Unfortunet Events"

    12 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2011

    Two thumbs up

    Im a kid so i should know.Now,you should really read this book.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2012

    The series is amazing. You MUST continue!

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2013

    I love it!

    This is an amazing book! It has such great detail. Lemony Snicket ( the author) makes you feel like your really there!

    6 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2012

    GREAT!

    One of my favorites out of the thirteen :D you cant put it down

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2012

    Love This Book

    I have been reading this series for a while. im on this book and it is really good reccomend for mystery lovers. Thank you and read this series

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2006

    Outstanding!!!!!

    this is absolutely the best book i have ever read Its awesome and wonderful.Full of suspense ,thrills and action that will make you want to read it again You have got to read this thrilling book youll be talking about it all the time (READ IT)!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2013

    amazing

    The book the carnivorus carnival by lemony sniket is amazing because there are suprises and scares ans suspence. I cant wait to read the next book in the series!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2013

    AMAZING

    BEST series ever! Best book in the series, too!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2013

    Love the series

    Love them

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2013

    I absoulutely loved theese books ( :

    I would reccomend theese books to anyone who can get a hold of this series at a store, their local library, or just borrow one from a friend! THIS IS A MUST READ BOOK KIND OF LIKE HOW DISNEY WORLD IS A MUST SEE PLACE FOR FAMILIES WITH YOUNG CHILDREN! I hope that many people will see this comment, read this this book( but read the other ones first) , and feel the same way as I do about theese phonominal books from this fantastical series. I am determined to get the entire human race reading theese books! It is my understanding that this comment is very long. Sorry about that you guys. Now that I think about it if you read this entire comment, then you must be used to reading really boring things. If you this book and series it will cure your boredom! With much respect, Anonymous ( ;

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2013

    AWSOME

    Best books in the world!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2013

    Some of the Jewel

    Best author ever!love his books!!!!!!:)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2012

    Yay

    Im akid buy lt

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2012

    Love it

    People who read this book(The Carnavis Carnaval) might be.....:& or :( but as we all know there is a bitter a inventor and a book worm so there is nothing to worry.


    Lemony Snickit

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2012

    Awesome

    These books rock so you have to read them. Lemmony snicket puts danger at every turn adds a good vocabulary and and a mystery on every page. You should totally read these books! They are awesome. I am only 9 years old. The snicket file a evil villain and some italian sause.Snicket is an absalutly amazing authur. You should buy these books on your nook or in stores
    Buy them fast or there will be no more left in stores

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 3, 2012

    Middle School Student Perspective

    A Book Review of Carnivorous Carnival
    by Julia, Grade 7, Yangon International School

    Life as an orphan can be a terrible existence! Perhaps, no orphans would have a more challenging existence than the Baudelaire children in Lemony Snicket¿s Carnivorous Carnival series. An author of several children¿s books, Snicket continues to develop the plight of the orphans in the ninth book of the series, Carnivorous Carnival. The three talented and distraught orphaned children truly desire to find their parents and take Count Olaf to jail. Will they ever be able to find their parents or will they stay with Count Olaf for the remainder of their childhood?
    After the tragedy of the burnt down hospital in book eight, the Baudelaire children arrive at the carnival after riding in the trunk of Count Olaf¿s car. Dressed up as freaks, the children attempt to stay hidden from Count Olaf. While doing so, the Baudelaire children hear Madame Lulu and Count Olaf talking about the orphans¿ parents. They must go and find their parents. It will not be easy to escape from Count Olaf and uncover the mystery about their parents. Can the Baudelaire children succeed?
    In this book, the author does a good job on developing the reader¿s interest. Reading this book will cause one to read all books in the series. Snicket¿s characters, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny are believable and geniuses. The Baudelaire children complications, experience so may the reader desires the Baudelaire children could be successful just once. While Snicket creates a climax in each story, he also builds to a final climax at the end of the series.
    Early teenagers should read this book. The characters are believable and provides good pictures in every chapter. On a scale of 1(low) to 5(high), I give this book a three because this book can cause sadness to kids who read this and also engaging when a problem starts.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2011

    I am weeping as write

    I decided twrite five star coments and thinking about this serie make sme cry.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2007

    A must read

    If you do or dont like reading I still say that you should read this book. It was fantastic in every way!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2002

    tHe BEsT onE yEt!!!

    i totally cant wait for it to come out, cuz ive read all the other ones(1-8) and they have been so interesting. i have seriously been sitting around since like december waiting for june to come, when this book will come out. but when it does, im sure it will be better then all the rest!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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