Carousel [Original Motion Picture Soundtrack]

Carousel [Original Motion Picture Soundtrack]

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by Gordon MacRae
     
 

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Rodgers and Hammerstein were relatively uninvolved in the movie version of their second musical, Carousel, which was the least successful of three adaptations of their shows released within an eight-month period from October 1955 to June 1956. Oklahoma!, which preceded it, and The King and I, which followed, were both blockbusters, while

Overview

Rodgers and Hammerstein were relatively uninvolved in the movie version of their second musical, Carousel, which was the least successful of three adaptations of their shows released within an eight-month period from October 1955 to June 1956. Oklahoma!, which preceded it, and The King and I, which followed, were both blockbusters, while Carousel failed to make back its considerable production cost. The dark-edged story had also been less of a success on Broadway, though still a big hit, and the casting of Shirley Jones and Gordon MacRae (the latter a last-minute replacement for Frank Sinatra, who walked out in a contract dispute), the same pair who had just appeared in Oklahoma!, may have dampened audiences' enthusiasm. The soundtrack album, however, was musically more complete containing songs like "You're a Queer One, Julie Jordan" and "Blow High, Blow Low" that had been cut from the film -- and more popular -- reaching the Top Five and selling a million copies -- than the movie. Jones (some of whose singing may have been dubbed by Marni Nixon) and MacRae perform well, as does the rest of the cast, particularly soprano Claramae Turner ("You'll Never Walk Alone"). Some lyrics have been bowdlerized, and a couple of minor songs are missing, but this is still a good version of the score, especially because of the larger orchestra. Subsequent CD reissues have expanded the album's length, and the 2001 edition is padded out with music from two lengthy ballet sections to bring the running time over 70 minutes. 2001 reissue producers Didier C. Deutsch and Charles L. Granata each contribute liner notes, and they overlap; the two essays should have been edited together. And since they make so much of Sinatra's defection, it would have been nice to have dug up the pre-recordings he made for the soundtrack.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/13/2001
Label:
Angel Records
UPC:
0724352735228
catalogNumber:
27352
Rank:
2368

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Gordon MacRae   Primary Artist,Vocals,Track Performer
Shirley Jones   Track Performer
Mixed Chorus & Orchestra   Track Performer
Alfred Newman   Conductor
Barbara Ruick   Vocals,Track Performer
Shirley Jones   Vocals
Claramae Turner   Vocals,Track Performer
Robert Rounseville   Vocals,Track Performer
Orchestra   Track Performer
William le Massena   Vocals
20th Century Orchestra   Performing Ensemble

Technical Credits

Ken Darby   Contributor
Didier C. Deutsch   Producer,Liner Notes,Photo Courtesy,Re-Release Producer
Oscar Hammerstein   Lyricist
John Palladino   Producer,Mastering Producer
Hubert Spencer   Orchestration
David Foil   Liner Notes
Charles Granata   Producer,Liner Notes,Reissue Producer
Henry Ephron   Programming,Producer
Jessica Novod   Art Direction
Burton Yount   Art Direction
Jessica Novod Berenblat   Art Direction
Gordon H. Jee   Art Direction

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5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Australian version of this "expanded" soundtrack differs from ours in that it does not contain the five minute dance sequence for JUNE IS BUSTIN OUT ALL OVER, but it does have the original tape masters for the PROLOGUE/MAIN TITLE and LOUISE'S BALLET. Our version simply lifts these sections from the finished film with sound effects and dialogue laid over the music. The Australian release uses the original recording session masters - giving credence to naysayer reviewers who bemoan the USA choices, claiming the original tapes did in fact still exist (and in superbly sounding stereo to boot).