Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks: The Rise and Fall of an Industrial City - New Haven, Connecticut

Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks: The Rise and Fall of an Industrial City - New Haven, Connecticut

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by Preston Maynard
     
 

In Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks, the editors and contributors trace the rise and fall of New Haven, Connecticut, as an industrial city. While New Haven’s story is typical of many thriving cities during the American Industrial Revolution—fascinating to preservationists, urban and landscape historians, architects, industrial archaeologists, and

Overview

In Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks, the editors and contributors trace the rise and fall of New Haven, Connecticut, as an industrial city. While New Haven’s story is typical of many thriving cities during the American Industrial Revolution—fascinating to preservationists, urban and landscape historians, architects, industrial archaeologists, and community historians—it is atypical as well. Most American industrial cities relied on the manufacture of a single product, but New Haven diversified, fabricating over one hundred assorted manufactured goods at the turn of the twentieth century. In a remarkable feat of historical continuity, Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks explores the origins, preservation, reclamation, and reuse of the extant industrial sites and firmly iterates a unique sense of place for modern citizens of this post-industrial city. Five scholarly narrative essays interpret specific sites, and detailed historical profiles are included for sixteen selected industrial sites located on or near New Haven's harbor, including the Quinnipiac Brewery and the Candee Rubber Company. More than one hundred historically significant illustrations depict historical and modern views of sites, the products manufactured there, and New Haven’s working people. Maps and tables illustrate the progress of the city’s urban development from the seventeenth through the mid-twentieth centuries. Based on primary source material including land and fire department records, city directories, newspaper articles, maps, and personal accounts, this book is the culmination of the Industrial Heritage Project of the New Haven Preservation Trust’s mission to evaluate and document the city’s historic industrial sites and to produce educational and advocacy programs for preservation efforts.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“This is predictably one of the year's best coffee-table books about New Haven. But it is far more than ornamental. It combines nine well-written and scholarly essays by people who care for New Haven and have thought deeply about the vibrant century from just after the Civil War to just after World War II . . . The book is a project of the New Haven Preservation Trust; Editor Preston Maynard was once the trust's executive director. It is also linked to a municipal development plan at City Hall. it results from five years of collegial research among preservationists and planners who seek new 21st century uses for old factories emptied by age and de-industrialization . . .This handsome volume, with a bit of whimsy in its title but with a wealth of knowledge in the analysis of its contributing experts, also offers what summer book lists call 'a good read'. You can't say that about many other community renewal proposals.”—New Haven Register

"The rending and repair of the urban fabric is much on the minds of this book's authors, as each makes a case for the rediscovery of New Haven's industrial soul."—Technology and Culture

“For those who appreciate industrial architecture, Carriages and Clocks proves New Haven holds an overwhelming number of examples; beautiful in their day, waiting to be made that way again.”—From Shore Publishing (Guilford Courier, North Haven Courier, Harbor News, and others)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584654209
Publisher:
University Press of New England
Publication date:
12/21/2004
Pages:
245
Product dimensions:
11.00(w) x 12.75(h) x 1.02(d)

Read an Excerpt

[W]hat most distinguished New Haven among Connecticut's industrial cities and towns was not its dominance in making one particular product but rather its diversity of manufacturing. Not only did the city produce an astonishing number of different products, but in several areas one or more New Haven firms were among the largest manufacturers in the state, if not the nation . . . New Haven's industrial past remains clearly visible in the physical fabric of the city: railroad tracks running down the middle of streets, brick factory complexes suddenly springing into view, and large tracts of nineteenth-century working class houses all continue to command our attention. The city today is, in great part, a product of a period of substantial prosperity based upon manufacturing, and we cannot fully appreciate what New Haven has become in the twenty-first century without an understanding of the city's industrial past." -- From the Introduction

Meet the Author

PRESTON MAYNARD, as Vice President and Community Development Officer for the Community Economic Development Fund directs a foundation grant and technical assistance program that aids urban communities with redevelopment projects. He is former Executive Director of the New Haven Preservation Trust and an advisor to the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

MARJORIE B. NOYES has been an editor of publications for the Yale Schools of Art and Architecture, the Yale School of Medicine, the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, the New Haven Trust for Historic Preservation, and numerous other nonprofit organizations. She is a member of the Board of Directors of the New Haven Preservation Trust and the Guilford (CT) Preservation Alliance.

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Carriages and Clocks, Corsets and Locks: The Rise and Fall of an Industrial City - New Haven, Connecticut 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
manirul01 More than 1 year ago
Amazing.....!Excellent......!Just enjoy it.....!