Carrot Soup

( 1 )

Overview

Take one rabbit, patiently growing carrots. Add his friends — Mole, Dog, Cat, Duck, and Pig. Mix all ingredients together for a superdelicious surprise!

But be careful: John Segal's whimsical story and pictures will sneak into your heart, until nothing will satisfy you except more Carrot Soup.

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Overview

Take one rabbit, patiently growing carrots. Add his friends — Mole, Dog, Cat, Duck, and Pig. Mix all ingredients together for a superdelicious surprise!

But be careful: John Segal's whimsical story and pictures will sneak into your heart, until nothing will satisfy you except more Carrot Soup.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The bread-baking Little Red Hen could have used some pals like those of hard-working Rabbit in this sweet-and tummy-tempting-picture book about a bunny and his favorite dish. As soon as spring arrives, Rabbit eagerly plows and plants, laying the groundwork for the orange crop that will become the delicious chief ingredient in the titular soup. After months of watering, weeding and waiting-expertly conveyed in a series of spot illustrations-Rabbit is ready to harvest his delicacy. But upon finding an empty carrot patch, Rabbit goes into a tizzy, asking all his animal friends if they've seen his veggies. While all his buddies feign ignorance, readers know the real story, humorously playing out in the background of Segal's (The Reluctant Dragon) airy and delicately hued watercolors. A frazzled and disappointed Rabbit finally returns home to a tasty surprise-and a cozy house full of friends. The spare text, with its fun repetition and visual story line, invites repeated readings for the very young. Segal's fresh paintings, a mix of sunny landscapes and vignettes, are like a breath of spring. For budding gourmands, a guide to carrot varieties and a carrot soup recipe are included. Ages 3-6. (Mar.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
It is spring, Rabbit's favorite season. It is time to plant his carrot garden. Rabbit plants, waters, weeds, and tends his garden. He waits and waits and waits. Finally it is time to pick his carrots and make his favorite carrot soup. But there is a problem. With his wheelbarrow and all his tools, rabbit goes to the garden to find—no carrots. Rabbit asks his friends Mole, Dog, Cat, Duck, and Pig in turn if they have seen his carrots, but all claim to know nothing. Sadly Rabbit returns home to discover all of his friends surprising him with piping hot bowls of carrot soup. Rabbit's heartwarming story is told in simple, sparse text and accompanied by whimsical illustrations. Youngsters will delight in watching Rabbit's friends lugging carrots and balloons behind his back as they get ready for the surprise party. A recipe for carrot soup follows the story. It all makes for a delightful book that is sure to please young listeners. 2006, Margaret K. McElderry Books, Ages 3 to 6.
—Pat Trattles
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Rabbit's favorite time of year is spring, when he can plant his garden. He plows, plants, waters, weeds, and waits for his carrots to grow, while looking forward to eating carrot soup. But at harvest time, he finds that all of his beloved plants are gone. As he asks his neighbors if they have seen his produce, each one skillfully avoids answering. In the background, readers see animals holding balloons, wearing party hats, and hauling away bucketloads of carrots. Disappointed, Rabbit returns home to discover that his friends have organized a party and cooked his favorite soup. The book ends with the word "Surprise!" and it is not clear if Rabbit is pleased or not. However, children will find this tale satisfying in its predictability and will enjoy being in on the secret. The illustrations are rendered in soft-hued watercolors with lots of white space and playful animal caricatures. Segal intermittently uses a storyboard format to convey the progression of the action. Read this tale along with Wilson Gage's Squash Pie (Dell, 1980, o.p.), Ruth Krauss's The Carrot Seed (HarperCollins, 1945), or Vladimir Vagin's The Enormous Carrot (Scholastic, 1998) for a tasty storytime-and try the carrot soup recipe at the back, too.-Be Astengo, Alachua County Library, Gainesville, FL Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Rabbit plants his carrot seeds, tends his garden and waits and waits. When harvest time arrives, he finds his garden empty! He angrily asks mole who directs him to dog who directs him to cat who directs him to duck who directs him to pig. Rabbit can't even find pig, and his carrots are still missing. He goes home dejected only to find SURPRISE! His house is full of friends and bowls of carrot soup. Segal's first solo venture is a winner from soup to nuts. His watercolors of a distressed Rabbit and his innocent-acting friends are a perfect extension of the spare text. The ever-growing line of carrot-toting friends inexpertly hiding behind trees on the right hand pages (behind Rabbit's back) will have toddlers giggling and pointing. Perfect for themes of gardening, friendship, parties and food. Rabbit's recipe for carrot soup is included. Delish! (Picture book. 2-5)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689877025
  • Publisher: Margaret K. McElderry Books
  • Publication date: 3/7/2006
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 906,517
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.32 (w) x 10.24 (h) x 0.38 (d)

Meet the Author

John Segal has illustrated many books for children, including Kenneth Grahame's The Reluctant Dragon, retold by Robert D. San Souci, and The Musicians of Bremen by Jane Yolen. His drawings have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Gourmet, and Travel & Leisure, and he is an award-winning designer of greeting cards for the Museum of Modern Art. This is the first book he has both written and illustrated.

John Segal lives in New York City and has two children, Emily and Josh.

John Segal has illustrated many books for children, including Kenneth Grahame's The Reluctant Dragon, retold by Robert D. San Souci, and The Musicians of Bremen by Jane Yolen. His drawings have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, Gourmet, and Travel & Leisure, and he is an award-winning designer of greeting cards for the Museum of Modern Art. This is the first book he has both written and illustrated.

John Segal lives in New York City and has two children, Emily and Josh.

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Customer Reviews

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