Cartels of the Mind: Japan's Intellectual Closed Shop

Overview

As Washington and Tokyo sort out their new power relationship and roles in post-Cold War Asia, Japan continues to block access of foreign professionals, Westerners and Asians alike. These cartels of the mind - market barriers - serve neither the professed goals of Japan nor those of the United States. Despite repeated promises to open up, Japanese legal, media, academic, and research organizations run an intellectual closed shop. American lawyers are stymied in efforts to help U.S. firms enter the Japanese ...
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Overview

As Washington and Tokyo sort out their new power relationship and roles in post-Cold War Asia, Japan continues to block access of foreign professionals, Westerners and Asians alike. These cartels of the mind - market barriers - serve neither the professed goals of Japan nor those of the United States. Despite repeated promises to open up, Japanese legal, media, academic, and research organizations run an intellectual closed shop. American lawyers are stymied in efforts to help U.S. firms enter the Japanese market. Foreign correspondents are systematically walled off from the most important sources. Resident Western and Asian academics in search of stable and productive careers and education find the roads blocked. Foreign scientists and engineers are kept out of Japan's state-of-the-art laboratories. Japan aspires to a permanent seat on the UN Security Council and a larger political voice, but its grand intellectual parsimony, argues the author, is simply not worthy of a world economic power. Cartels of the Mind looks deeply into the causes of these cultural and institutional barriers and examines ineffective past attempts to challenge them. In a time when many American scholars, journalists, and public intellectuals have been fearful of criticizing Japanese practices, Cartels of the Mind provides an insider's perceptive study of Japan's professional barriers, both institutional and psychological, against the entire outside world.
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What People Are Saying

Ezra Vogel
"Ivan Hall is a wonderfully trained scholar... Here he presents the most detailed and informed account of the problems that foreign intellectuals face in a country that is partially open." -- Director of the Fairbank Center for East Asian Research
Akira Iriye
"This book offers a brilliant examination of contemporary Japan's cultural nationalism, and its cultural isolation in the world against the backdrop of the author's rich professional life as a scholar of Japanese history, an administrator of exchange programs, and a teacher in Japanese universities. The book will provoke controversy, but if the controversy produces specific suggestions for the best ways of undermining what Hall calls Japan's 'manipulated dialogue' with other countries and establishing the kind of 'cultural and intellectual interchange as conceived of by the rest of the advanced industrialized democracies,' the book will have served its purpose." -- Professor of History, Harvard University
Eamonn Fingleton
"As Ivan Hall demonstrates over and over again in this important book, Japan's exquisitely aloof and un-Western intelligentsia is evidently more than happy to perpetuate this state of affairs." -- Author of Blindside: Why Japan Is Still on Track to Overtake the U.S. by the Year 2000
Glen S. Fukushima
"A brilliant analysis of the most profound barrier -- the core of the multi-layered onion -- that isolates Japan from the rest of the world. Ivan Hall carefully documents how Japan systematically blocks access by foreign professionals to intellectual discourse and debate. Essential reading to understand the essence of Japanese exclusionism." -- Vice President, American Chamber of Commerce in Japan; Vice Chairman, Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission; and Former Deputy Assistant U.S. trade Representtive for Japan and China
Clyde Prestowitz
"This insightful book by an author with unique experience in Japan's intellectual world provides extraordinary insights into Japan's institutional psychology and is a must read for those who truly want to understand Japan." -- Director of the Economic Strategy Institute
Edward G. Swidensticker
"For those who believe that reciprocity -- the Golden Rule -- is a good thing in international relations, this superbly written book should be required reading. By showing how and why Japan fails to do unto others as it would like them to do unto itself, Ivan Hall provides the knowledge and awareness essential as the first step toward changing these long-entrenched patterns." -- Translator and professor emeritus, Columbia University
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393347760
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 11/1/1997
  • Pages: 210
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.48 (d)

Meet the Author

Ivan Hall has spent nearly three decades in Japan as a correspondent, cultural diplomat, and academic. He was the first associate director of the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission and spent nine years teaching as a professor in Japanese universities. He lives in Tokyo.

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Table of Contents

Introduction: "Normal Country" - Foreign Intellectuals Need Not Apply 7
1 Legal Landing - The Attorneys' Narrow Beachhead 17
2 Segregated Scribes - The Foreign Correspondents 45
3 Academic Apartheid - The Peripheral Professoriate 80
4 Passing Presences - Scientific Researchers and Foreign Students 123
5 Manipulated Dialogue - Cowing the Critics 150
Conclusion: Wake-Up Call: Let the Daylight In 180
Notes 187
Acknowledgments 199
Index 201
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