Casanova [Bonus Disc]

Casanova [Bonus Disc]

by The Divine Comedy
     
 

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Turning back to a slightly more straightforward rock/pop format turned out to be advantageous for Neil Hannon; Casanova turned into a smash hit in the U.K., while the singles "Something for the Weekend" (at once soaring, cheeky, leering, and truly weird, with lyrics detailing a guy led astray by his lover and attacked by her secret thug companions) and

Overview

Turning back to a slightly more straightforward rock/pop format turned out to be advantageous for Neil Hannon; Casanova turned into a smash hit in the U.K., while the singles "Something for the Weekend" (at once soaring, cheeky, leering, and truly weird, with lyrics detailing a guy led astray by his lover and attacked by her secret thug companions) and "Becoming More Like Alfie" (a sly '60s acoustic pop number with solid percussion, sampling the Michael Caine movie in question and reflecting on how all the wrong people in life seem to get the girls) became Top Ten charters. Recruiting the equivalent of a full orchestra didn't hurt either, fleshing out the classical/art rock/pop Divine Comedy fusion to even more expansive ranges than before, while drummer Darren Allison and Hannon continued overseeing and co-producing everything, again demonstrating their careful collective ear for the proceedings. Hannon's lyrical music fires on all cylinders as well, from the cockeyed vision of romance in "The Frog Princess" (with more than one low-key French reference in both lyrics and sweeping music) to the wickedly funny and elegant "Songs of Love," detailing how boys and girls seem to be in heat everywhere while all the songwriters are stuck alone writing the title objects in question. In the meantime, there are great one-off moments scattered throughout Casanova. For instance, Hannon's impersonation of a modern dandy as fortune teller at the start of "Middle-Class Heroes" is to die for. He also does one of the best Barry White takeoffs yet recorded in the mid-song break of "Charge," packed with Tennyson references and army commands amid swirling strings and an increasingly loud beat. After topping that off with "Theme from Casanova," a slightly tongue-in-cheek number detailing all the basic credits and inspiration for the album, the result is a massive project that hits the jackpot with smiles all around.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/21/1997
Label:
Tristar
UPC:
0766923686324
catalogNumber:
36863

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Divine Comedy   Primary Artist
Darren Allison   Percussion,Drums
Kathy Brown   Cello
Robin Smith   Trumpet
John Allen   Celeste,Human Whistle
Alice Reynolds   Laughs
Padraic Savage   Violin
Joby Talbot   Conductor,Alto Saxophone,Performing Ensemble
Titch Walker   Trumpet
Jane Watkins   Cello
Neil Hannon   Guitar,Percussion,Bass Guitar,Hammond Organ,Human Whistle,Timpani,Wurlitzer
Alison Fletcher   Violin,Viola
Anna Giddey   Violin
Alex McRonald   Flute
Alex Postlethwaite   Violin
Alice Pratley   Violin
Adrian Roach   Oboe
Stuart "Pinkie" Bates   Bass Trombone
Charlotte Glasson   Baritone Saxophone,Tenor Saxophone,Viola
Chris Worsey   Cello
Jane Butterfield   Trombone
Robin Hayward   Tuba
Emile Chitikov   Violin
Eos Counsell   Violin
Rebecca Hayes   Violin
Mary Bellamy   Clarinet
Ruth Goldstein   Cello
Chris Warner   Percussion
Mark Knight   Violin
Laura Samuel   Violin

Technical Credits

Darren Allison   Producer
Mark Eitzel   Composer
John Allen   Contributor
Kevin Westenberg   Art Direction
Alice Reynolds   Contributor
Joby Talbot   Arranger
Neil Hannon   Arranger,Composer,Producer,Art Direction

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