The Case Against the Global Economy: And for a Turn Toward the Local by Jerry Mander, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
The Case Against the Global Economy: And for a Turn Toward the Local

The Case Against the Global Economy: And for a Turn Toward the Local

by Jerry Mander
     
 
A great political debate is emerging over the many unexpected and profound consequences of the rush toward the global economy and its effects on jobs, human rights, cultural diversity, democracy, and the natural world. The world's political and corporate leaders are restructuring the planet's economic and political arrangements in ways that directly affect humans and

Overview

A great political debate is emerging over the many unexpected and profound consequences of the rush toward the global economy and its effects on jobs, human rights, cultural diversity, democracy, and the natural world. The world's political and corporate leaders are restructuring the planet's economic and political arrangements in ways that directly affect humans and the environment more than anything since the Industrial Revolution. New, giant globalizing institutions such as the World Trade Organization, GATT, and the World Bank, created with scant public debate or scrutiny, have moved real power away from citizen democracies and nation states to global corporate bureaucracies, with grave results.

The Case Against the Global Economy is the first comprehensive point-by-point analysis of the new global economy, its premise and its full social and ecological implications. The work gathers 43 leading economic, agricultural, cultural, and environmental experts who charge that free trade and economic globalization are producing exactly the opposite results from what has been promised. In the end, it is clear that we need to reverse course, turning away from globalization toward a revitalized democracy, local self-sufficiency, and ecological health. With an introduction by Jerry Mander and David C. Korten.

Essays include: Wendell Berry, "Conserving Communities"; Vandana Shiva and Radha Holla-Bhar, "Piracy by Patent: The Case of the Neem Tree"; Ralph Nader and Lori Wallach, "GATT, NAFTA, and the Subversion of the Democratic Process"; William Greider, "Citizen GE"; Jeremy Rifkin, "New Technology and the End of Jobs"; Helena Norberg-Hodge, "The Pressure toModernize and Globalize"; David Korten, "The Mythic Victory of Market Capitalism"; Kirkpatrick Sale, "Principles of Bioregionalism"; Herman E. Daly, "Free Trade: The Perils of Deregulation"; Richard Barnet and John Cavanaugh, "Homogenization and Global Culture"; and Maude Barlow and Heather-jane Robertson, "Homogenization and Education," among many others.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The contributors to this handbookamong them Jeremy Rifkin, Ralph Nader, Kirkpatrick Sale, Wendell Berry, Richard Barnet, William Greider, ecological economist Herman Daly and World Bank environmental adviser Robert Goodlandargue that the rush toward economic globalization, based on free trade and deregulation, is both harmful and reversible. Its consequences, they contend, include overcrowded cities, widening of the gap between rich and poor, lowering of wages while prices soar, destruction of wilderness, flattening of local traditions and cultures. The contributors recommend pursuing the opposite pathpromoting greater economic localization through cooperatives and small companies that cater to local or regional markets. Essays deal with corporate control of the media and of financial markets; biotechnology's patenting of life forms as neocolonialist exploitation; the worldwide small-farm movement; the emergence of local currencies, barter and work exchange networks; and how global trade agreements (NAFTA, GATT) override decisions on worker safety and environmental standards made democratically by member nations. An important, vital resource for planetary stewardship. Mander (In the Absence of the Sacred) cofounded the International Forum on Globalization; Goldsmith is a founding editor of Britain's Ecologist. (Sept.)
Booknews
Forty-three essays explain the controversial effects of globalization and present an array of alternatives by examining such topics as the pressure to modernize and globalize, global economy and the Third World, homogenization of education and global culture, the environment, sustainable growth, free trade, neo-development, corporate rule, electronic money, local interdependence, conserving communities, and bioregionalism. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780871563521
Publisher:
Sierra Club Books
Publication date:
09/01/1996
Pages:
600
Product dimensions:
6.39(w) x 9.29(h) x 1.72(d)

Meet the Author

Jerry Mander is the author of Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television and In the Absence of the Sacred. He is a senior fellow at the Public Media Center and program director of the Foundation for Deep Ecology. He lives in San Francisco, California. Edward Goldsmith is the founding editor of The Ecologist, Europe's leading environmental journal, and the author of more than fifteen books on ecological issues. He lives in London, England. Both are co-founders of the International Forum on Globalization.

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