Case For Make-Believe: Saving Play in Our Commercialized World

Case For Make-Believe: Saving Play in Our Commercialized World

by Susan Linn
     
 


In The Case for Make Believe, Harvard child psychologist Susan Linn tells the alarming story of childhood under siege in a commercialized and technology-saturated world. Although play is essential to human development and children are born with an innate capacity for make believe, Linn argues that, in modern-day America, nurturing creative play is not onlySee more details below

Overview


In The Case for Make Believe, Harvard child psychologist Susan Linn tells the alarming story of childhood under siege in a commercialized and technology-saturated world. Although play is essential to human development and children are born with an innate capacity for make believe, Linn argues that, in modern-day America, nurturing creative play is not only countercultural—it threatens corporate profits.

A book with immediate relevance for parents and educators alike, The Case for Make Believe helps readers understand how crucial child’s play is—and what parents and educators can do to protect it. At the heart of the book are stories of children at home, in school, and at a therapist’s office playing about real-life issues from entering kindergarten to a sibling’s death, expressing feelings they can’t express directly, and making meaning of an often confusing world.

In an era when toys come from television and media companies sell videos as brain-builders for babies, Linn lays out the inextricable links between play, creativity, and health, showing us how and why to preserve the space for make believe that children need to lead fulfilling and meaningful lives.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A wonderful look at how playing can heal children, how in “pretend-worlds” they can find their truest selves. [Linn’s] fierce advocacy for kids is on every page of this terrific book."
The Boston Globe

"[A] welcome addition to such books as D.W. Winnicott’s Playing and Reality, Bruno
Bettleheim’s The Uses of Enchantment, and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi’s Flow."
Library Journal

"Linn brings invaluable expertise to this well-organized and straightforward exploration of a neglected subject."
Booklist

Publishers Weekly

A ventriloquist and psychologist, Linn (Consuming Kids) claims that the act of make-believe is disappearing. In her impassioned plea for its survival, Linn reveals that play has many benefits, including helping kids develop problem-solving, critical thinking and social skills. Play also enables children to explore their inner feelings, cope with challenges and promotes emotional healing. Linn reveals how she uses puppets to encourage deeply troubled kids to explore their feelings, pointing out that imaginative play helps all children cope with such issues as separation, anger and fear. Tragically, Linn claims, play is on a downswing, replaced by TV time and highly marketed media-linked toys and electronic media that discourage real creativity. In fact, despite the American Academy of Pediatrics' recommendation to prohibit screen time until the age of two, a study Linn cites reveals that 40% of infants under three months are regular screen viewers. The director of the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, Linn claims that the demise of play is a public health problem requiring an urgent campaign. She concludes with ways parents can incorporate creative play, while acknowledging the challenge of swimming against the powerful media tide. (May)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781565849709
Publisher:
New Press, The
Publication date:
05/01/2008
Pages:
258
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.30(h) x 1.20(d)

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