×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Case of Oscar Slater
     

The Case of Oscar Slater

by Arthur Conan Doyle, Digital Text Publishing Co.
 

See All Formats & Editions

Oscar Slater was a victim of a miscarriage of justice. Arthur Conan Doyle heard about the case and, in 1912, published this book as a plea for a full pardon for Slater. (120 pages).

The Publisher has copy-edited this book to improve the formatting, style and accuracy of the text to make it readable. This did not involve changing the substance of the text.

Overview

Oscar Slater was a victim of a miscarriage of justice. Arthur Conan Doyle heard about the case and, in 1912, published this book as a plea for a full pardon for Slater. (120 pages).

The Publisher has copy-edited this book to improve the formatting, style and accuracy of the text to make it readable. This did not involve changing the substance of the text.

Oscar Slater--The Great Suspect

.....Slater, whose real name was Oscar Leschziner, was a 37-year-old German Jew who had fled Germany to avoid conscription. He was a turn-of-the-century rogue surviving by his wits as a gambler. In 1901 he had married May Curtis, but May had drunk too much, and Slater had left her in 1905. In London, he had met and moved in with Andree Antoine, a prostitute. They traveled frequently, and because the estranged May was always hounding him for money, it became Slater's practice to adopt aliases and false destinations. The day Oscar had left with Andree for America, he had told friends they were going to Monte Carlo for a vacation. (Actually, a friend had invited him to San Francisco on business.) The police discovered that the pawned brooch was Slater's own, but they charged him with murder anyway because of his skulking demeanor and sordid life-style. If Slater had had any idea he would be hewing granite at Peterhead Prison for the next 18 1/2 years, it is doubtful whether he would have so willingly returned to Scotland.

.....Slater was tried in Edinburgh on May 3, 1909, before the Honorable Lord Guthrie and 15 jurymen. Slater sat upright in the dock, tidy and dignified, convinced they would never find an innocent man guilty.

.....Scotland had no legal system for appealing Slater's case, but two days before he was to hand, a petition bearing 20,000 signatures forced his reprieve. Slater disappeared into the granite quarries at Peterhead, but public agitation kept his plight before officials.

.....In 1912 Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, already world-famous for his cocaine-shooting literary sleuth, Sherlock Holmes, espoused Slater's cause in a pamphlet, The Case of Oscar Slater, which blasted Slater's conviction. Still, officials refused to reopen the case.

.....Two years later, a special inquiry was held when a highly respected Glasgow detective, Lt. John Trench, accused Lambie and Barrowman of perjury. Lambie, Barrowman, and the police vehemently denied the accusations, and the case was closed. Trench was immediately dismissed from the force.

Excerpts:

.....It is impossible to read and weigh the facts in connection with the conviction of Oscar Slater in May, 1909, at the High Court in Edinburgh, without feeling deeply dissatisfied with the proceedings, and morally certain that justice was not done. Under the circumstances of Scotch law I am not clear how far any remedy exists, but it will, in my opinion, be a serious scandal if the man be allowed upon such evidence to spend his life in a convict prison. The verdict which led to his condemnation to death, was given by a jury of fifteen, who voted; Nine for "Guilty," five for "Non-proven," and one for "Not Guilty." Under English law, this division of opinion would naturally have given cause for a new trial. In Scotland the man was condemned to death, he was only reprieved two days before his execution, and he is now working out a life sentence in Peterhead convict establishment. How far the verdict was a just one, the reader may judge for himself.......

.....This is a condensation of a very interesting and searching piece of the cross-examination which reveals several things. One is Lambie's qualities as a witness. Another is the very curious picture of the old lady, the book-maker and the servant-maid all at dinner together. The last and most important is the fact, that a knowledge of the jewels had got out.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940012383051
Publisher:
Digital Text Publishing Company
Publication date:
04/10/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
120
File size:
41 KB

Meet the Author

A prolific author of books, short stories, poetry, and more, the Scottish writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930) is best known for the creation of one of literature’s most vivid and enduring characters: Sherlock Holmes. Through detailed observation, vast knowledge, and brilliant deduction, Holmes and his trusted friend, Dr. Watson, step into the swirling fog of Victorian London to rescue the innocent, confound the guilty, and solve the most perplexing puzzles known to literature.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
May 22, 1859
Date of Death:
July 7, 1930
Place of Birth:
Edinburgh, Scotland
Place of Death:
Crowborough, Sussex, England
Education:
Edinburgh University, B.M., 1881; M.D., 1885

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews