The Case of the Case of Mistaken Identity (Brixton Brothers Series #1)

The Case of the Case of Mistaken Identity (Brixton Brothers Series #1)

4.1 35
by Mac Barnett, Adam Rex
     
 

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Steve Brixton always wanted to be a detective...
until he found out he already WAS one.

It all starts here: The thrilling story of Steve Bixton's first case. Our hero has a national treasure to recover, a criminal mastermind to unmask, and a social studies report due Monday — all while on the run from cops, thugs, and secret-agent librarians.

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Overview

Steve Brixton always wanted to be a detective...
until he found out he already WAS one.

It all starts here: The thrilling story of Steve Bixton's first case. Our hero has a national treasure to recover, a criminal mastermind to unmask, and a social studies report due Monday — all while on the run from cops, thugs, and secret-agent librarians.

Since when can librarians rappel from helicopters? Does Steve have any brothers or sisters? If not, then why is this series called The Brixton Brothers? You will solve all these mysteries and many more by the time you finish The Case of the Case of Mistaken Identity.

We think you'll agree: Steve Brixton's first adventure is his best adventure yet.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 4–6—Aspiring detective Steve Brixton, 12, gets more than he bargained for when he becomes mixed up with crime-fighting and undercover operatives who are also—librarians! Steve, an avid reader, has been diligently studying The Bailey Brothers' Detective Handbook and has turned into quite a supersleuth. He is working on a social-studies project on early American needlework (definitely not his choice) at the library, and checks out An Illustrated History of American Quilting when a man holds a gun to his head. It seems that all books have coded information in their Library of Congress numbers for the Librarians, who are highly trained intelligence agents. This clandestine society of crime-fighters suspects Steve is working for the mysterious Mr. E., who sells America's secrets. They plan on charging him with treason if he does not come clean about his involvement with the villain and his knowledge about a missing historical quilt that has major information embroidered on it. Barnett's fast-moving plot is sure to hold readers' attention, and children will love Steve's ability to outsmart many of the adults in the story. Incorporating mistaken identities, kidnapping, and a secret underground society, this is a fun, humorous adventure.—Mairead McInnes, Oakdale-Bohemia Middle School, NY
Children's Literature - Patricia Williamson
If you are a fan of the Hardy Boys or enjoy the Sherlock Holmes Trio mysteries, this new series is for you. The cover art is very much modeled after the original Hardy Boys books, with scenes from various adventures scattered across the inside front and back. Steve Brixton dreams of solving the "crime of the century," but little does he know that the crime involves…him? Barnett's novel has many twists and turns. Steve is wanted by the government, chased by the police and has a series of misadventures, one after the other. This thriller is hard to put down. What is the clue that Steve will get from a book on quilting? Why is he being accused of treason? Does he have a brother or sister of whom he is unaware? As Steve works to uncover and unravel all of the excitement and clear his name, The Bailey Brothers' Detective Handbook leads the way in the dark. This page-turner leaves you waiting for book 2! Reviewer: Patricia Williamson

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416978152
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
Publication date:
10/06/2009
Series:
Brixton Brothers Series, #1
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
1,354,842
Product dimensions:
8.46(w) x 5.84(h) x 0.84(d)
Lexile:
590L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

The Case of the Case of Mistaken Identity


  • STEVE BRIXTON, A.K.A. STEVE, was reading on his too-small bed. He was having trouble getting comfortable, and for a few good reasons. His feet were hanging off the edge. Bedsprings were poking his ribs. His sheets were full of cinnamon-graham-cracker crumbs. But the main reason Steve was uncomfortable was that he was lying on an old copy of the Guinness Book of World Records, which was 959 pages long, and which he had hidden under his mattress.

    If for some reason you were looking under Steve’s mattress and found the Guinness Book of World Records, you’d probably think it was just an ordinary book. That was the point. Open it up and you’d see that Steve had cut an identical rectangle out from the middle of every one of its pages. Then he had pasted the pages together. It had taken over two weeks to finish, and Steve had developed an allergic reaction to the paste, but it was worth it. When Steve was done, the book had a secret compartment. It wasn’t just a book anymore. It was a top secret book-box. And inside that top secret book-box was Steve’s top secret notebook. And that top secret notebook was where Steve recorded all sorts of notes and observations, including, on page one, a list of the Fifty-Nine Greatest Books of All Time.

    First on his list was a shiny red book called The Bailey Brothers’ Detective Handbook, written by MacArthur Bart. The handbook was packed with the Real Crime-Solving Tips and Tricks employed by Shawn and Kevin Bailey, a.k.a. America’s Favorite Teenage Supersleuths, a.k.a. the Bailey Brothers, in their never-ending fight against goons and baddies and criminals and crime. The Bailey Brothers, of course, were the heroes of the best detective stories of all time, the Bailey Brothers Mysteries. And their handbook told you everything they knew: what to look for at a crime scene (shoe prints, tire marks, and fingerprints), the ways to crack a safe (rip jobs, punch jobs, and old man jobs), and where to hide a top secret notebook (in a top secret book-box). Basically, The Bailey Brothers’ Detective Handbook told you how to do all the stuff that the Bailey Brothers were completely ace at.

    The Bailey Brothers, of course, were the sons of world-famous detective Harris Bailey. They helped their dad solve his toughest cases, and they had all sorts of dangerous adventures, and these adventures were the subject of the fifty-eight shiny red volumes that made up the Bailey Brothers Mysteries, also written by MacArthur Bart. Numbers two through fifty-nine on Steve Brixton’s list of the Fifty-Nine Greatest Books of All Time were taken up by the Bailey Brothers Mysteries.

    Steve had already read all the Bailey Brothers books. Most of them he had read twice. A few he’d read three times. His favorite Bailey Brothers mystery was whichever one he was reading at the time. That meant that right now, as Steve lay on his lumpy bed, his favorite book was Bailey Brothers #13: The Mystery of the Hidden Secret. Steve was finishing up chapter seventeen, which at the moment was his favorite chapter, and which ended like this:

    “Jumping jackals!” dark-haired Shawn exclaimed, pointing to the back wall of the dusty old parlor. “Look, Kevin! That bookcase looks newer than the rest!”

    “General George Washington!” his blond older brother cried out. “I think you’re right!” Kevin rubbed his chin and thought. “Hold on just a minute, Shawn. This mansion has been abandoned for years. Nobody lives here. So who would have built a new bookshelf?”

    Shawn and Kevin grinned at each other. “The robbers!” they shouted in unison.

    “Say, I’ll bet this bookshelf covers a secret passageway that leads to their hideout,” Shawn surmised.

    “Which is where we’ll find the suitcase full of stolen loot!” Kevin cried.

    The two sleuths crossed over to the wall and stood in front of the suspicious bookcase. Shawn thought quietly for a few seconds.

    “I know! Let’s try to push the bookcase over,” Shawn suggested.

    “Hey, it can’t be any harder than Coach Biltmore’s tackling practice,” joked athletic Kevin, who lettered in football and many other varsity sports.

    “One, two, three, heave!” shouted Shawn. The boys threw their weight into the bookshelf, lifting with their legs to avoid back injuries. There was a loud crash as the bookshelf detached from the wall and toppled over. The dust cleared and revealed a long, dark hallway!

    “I knew it!” whooped Shawn. “Let’s go!”

    “Not so fast, kids,” said a strange voice. “You won’t be recoverin’ the loot that easy.”

    Shawn and Kevin whirled around to see a shifty-eyed man limping toward them, his scarred face visible in the moonlight through the window.

    The man was holding a knife!

    That was where the chapter ended, and when Carol Brixton, a.k.a. Steve’s mom, called him downstairs to dinner.

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