BN.com Gift Guide

Case Studies in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $2.10
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 97%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $2.10   
  • New (4) from $73.99   
  • Used (5) from $2.10   

Overview

After an introduction to the current theories and research findings related to brain injury rehabilitation, this text presents 20 case studies of adults who sustained severe brain damage caused by traumatic head injuries, encephalitis, stroke, hypoxia and other conditions. Problems that follow such injuries are analyzed in detail; these include loss of self-care skills, memory impairment, and language, reading, visuoperceptual and behavioral difficulties. The chapters describe the lifestyle of each individual before the onset of brain damage and the subsequent symptoms, neuropsychological assessment, rehabilitation, and long-term outcome of their condition. Most chapters include a report by the patient and/or family member, thus enhancing the reader's understanding of the predicaments faced by brain-injured individuals as they learn to cope with traumatic changes in lifestyle. Although improvement for those with severe brain injuries is slow and limited, the patients described in the book made some progress after their admission to rehabilitation services. The exhaustive analysis of each case and a step-by-step description of management will serve as an inspiring and informative guide for students, professionals and other caregivers.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Sandra Weintraub, PhD (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)
Description: Twenty rehabilitation case studies of patients who sustained brain injury are described in this book, authored by one of the foremost experts in cognitive rehabilitation. Amnesia, aphasia, visual agnosia, and difficulties with behavioral control and self-care are among the target symptoms for treatment.
Purpose: The author's hope that "this book will persuade psychologists, neuropsychologists, neurosurgeons, and therapists that rehabilitation for brain-injured people is not only worthwhile but also essential" is fulfilled.
Audience: This book is useful to a wide range of disciplines working with brain injured patients.
Features: Chapter 1 is a too-cursory introduction to mechanisms of brain injury. Chapter 2 points out benefits and drawbacks to different rehabilitation approaches, including cognitive re-training, compensatory programs, and the "holistic" approach. The efficacy of rehabilitation is not, however, specifically discussed in this book, perhaps due to the relative paucity of evaluative evidence. There are charts for documenting functional examples of different cognitive deficits that are useful. The author's immense creativity in the application of current principles of neurocognitive organization to practical management of cognitive deficits is evident throughout. Rehabilitation strategies are grounded in cognitive science and based directly on formal neuropsychological test results or experimental evidence. The chapter entitled "Ted: The Man Who Could Read 'Astrocytoma' But Not 'Dog'" illustrates the way in which an experimental approach can identify components of complex mental processes that are selectively impaired and those that may be spared, guiding rehabilitation strategies.
Assessment: In some ways, this is a very personal account of the author's journey with each patient from the point of diagnosis to outcome. In these days of managed care, with pressures for ever shorter and fewer sessions with patients, and a clamor for "outcome studies" based on large samples of patients, this book is a fitting example of how the methodical, theory-grounded, individually-tailored approach is something to be aspired to rather than replaced.
Sandra Weintraub
Twenty rehabilitation case studies of patients who sustained brain injury are described in this book, authored by one of the foremost experts in cognitive rehabilitation. Amnesia, aphasia, visual agnosia, and difficulties with behavioral control and self-care are among the target symptoms for treatment. "The author's hope that this book will persuade psychologists, neuropsychologists, neurosurgeons, and therapists that rehabilitation for brain-injured people is not only worthwhile but also essential is fulfilled. "This book is useful to a wide range of disciplines working with brain injured patients. "Chapter 1 is a too-cursory introduction to mechanisms of brain injury. Chapter 2 points out benefits and drawbacks to different rehabilitation approaches, including cognitive re-training, compensatory programs, and the holistic approach. The efficacy of rehabilitation is not, however, specifically discussed in this book, perhaps due to the relative paucity of evaluative evidence. There are charts for documenting functional examples of different cognitive deficits that are useful. The author's immense creativity in the application of current principles of neurocognitive organization to practical management of cognitive deficits is evident throughout. Rehabilitation strategies are grounded in cognitive science and based directly on formal neuropsychological test results or experimental evidence. The chapter entitled Ted: The Man Who Could Read 'Astrocytoma' But Not 'Dog' illustrates the way in which an experimental approach can identify components of complex mental processes that are selectively impaired and those that may be spared, guiding rehabilitation strategies. "In some ways,this is a very personal account of the author's journey with each patient from the point of diagnosis to outcome. In these days of managed care, with pressures for ever shorter and fewer sessions with patients, and a clamor for outcome studies based on large samples of patients, this book is a fitting example of how the methodical, theory-grounded, individually-tailored approach is something to be aspired to rather than replaced.

3 Stars from Doody
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780195065985
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 1/28/1999
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 9.30 (w) x 6.30 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Table of Contents

Part I: Setting the Scene
1. Patients and their Problems
2. Principles and Practices of Rehabilitation
Part II: Living with Memory Disorders
3. Jack: Coming to Terms with Amnesia
4. Jay: Compensating for Amnesia
5. Alex: Some recovery, Return to Work and Marriage Following Anoxic Brain Damage
Part III: Memory and Other Cognitive Problems
6. The Man Who Continues to Have Just Woken Up
7. Martin: A Complete Human Being
8. Lorna: Cognitive Decline and Myotonic Dystrophy
9. Jason: Learning to Be Independent After Encephalitis
Part IV: Language Impairment
10. Bill: Learning to Communicate with Symbols Five Years After a Stroke
11. Laurence: Listening to the Message and Not the Words
12. Ron: Picking Up the Pieces
Part V: Remediation of Acquired Disorders of Reading
13. Ted: The Man Who Could Read "Astrocytoma" But Not "Dog"
14. Derek: Re-learning to Read After a Gunshot Wound
15. Jenny: Regaining Quality of Life Following a Horse Riding Accident
Part VI: Perceptual and Visuospatial Problems
16. Paula: Fear of Physiotherapy and Problems Recognizing Objects After a Severe Head Injury
17. Kirsty: A Case of Optic Aphasia, Associative Agnosia or Semantic Memory Impairment?
18. Richard: A Socially Skilled Young Man Despite Severe Memory and Perceptual Difficulties
19. Dolly: Learning to Attend to the Left Side of Space
Part VII: Behavior and Self-Care Skills
20. Jim: Improving Concentration and Reducing Behavior Problems
21. Improving the Self-Care Skills of a Woman with Quadriplegia and Dysarthria
22. Sarah: Learning Some Self-Care Skills After an Anaesthetic Accident

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)