Cases in Management and Organizational Behavior, Vol. 2 / Edition 1

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Overview

Realistic, intermediate-length cases make up this inexpensive casebook. Based on real events but with all names changed, the cases either illustrate theory or describe a recent real-life dilemma requiring a decision. Cases are long enough to require significant analysis from the reader, but short enough that a wide variety of topics can be covered. Describes the full range of management, systems, group, interpersonal, and individual topics; also highlights international business, globalization, diversity, ethics, communications, and human resource decisions. References each case to several leading management and organizational behavior books. Offers a versatile range of material and organization, making book suitable for a variety of uses. An inexpensive, handy reference for trainers, organizational development consultants, and other Human Resources professionals.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780130894649
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 9/17/2001
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 107
  • Sales rank: 845,769
  • Product dimensions: 8.30 (w) x 10.70 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Teri C. Tompkins, the eldest in a large family, was born and raised in southern California, where she has enjoyed the rich diversity of people and geography. She received her bachelor of arts and master of science degrees from California State University, Long Beach in not-for-profit management from the Recreation and Leisure Studies department. Her mother often asked her if she was still majoring in "fun." She held several positions in youth agencies including the Girl Scouts of the U.S.A.

In 1983, she quit her job to train and qualify for the 1984 Olympic archery trials. The experience gave her confidence to change careers. She enrolled in the M.B.A. program at The Claremont Graduate University (CGU). As a research assistant for Professor Vijay Sathe, she began researching and writing cases. She subsequently enrolled in the Ph.D. program, and used cases as part of her dissertation research. Upon graduation from CGU, she joined the faculty at The University of Redlands, and became involved in the Western Casewriters Association, where she became president from 1995 to 1996. She is a member of the North American Case Research Association. After receiving tenure at the University of Redlands in 1999, she served as department chair until 2001. She then joined the faculty at Pepperdine University in 2001.

She consults in the areas of team development and learning. Her interests include writing biographies for children, and anything t8 do with nature including, hiking, biking, and natural science. After delaying parenthood for years, she and her spouse are thoroughly enjoying raising two daughters, ages four and six.

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Read an Excerpt

I've put this book together to fill a void that I think exists in the field of case teaching. There are not enough intermediate-length cases, especially in organizational behavior and management. Most cases available for the classroom are long, messy cases requiring total commitment to "the case method." There is rarely enough time to review and discuss theory or to include classroom exercises. The alternatives are the short cases at the end of the chapter in the textbook. These cases are usually fictional or gleaned from an article, such as found in the Wall Street Journal, not from direct contact with the organization and the people. They require very little thinking from students, with the "problem" and "right answer" clearly drawn from the chapter in question. These end-of-chapter cases provide little challenge for students.

The intermediate-length cases in this book are messy enough that students have to think to analyze them, yet short enough that the instructor can include other teaching methods such as lecture or classroom exercises. The cases are real—the facts of the case have not been altered to make it more illustrative or plausible. Consequently, many of the cases have strong emotional undertones, which draw the students into the case and help them relate to the key characters. Students care about what happens to the people and the organization. Classroom discussion is lively. Students gain mastery of the course content because they have used course-pertinent theories and concepts, along with their own reasoning and relevant experience, to approach genuine organizational problems.

Where Can You Use This Book?

Courses in management or organizational behavior
I've included a detailed matrix referencing each case to 18 different subject chapters. There are numerous cases that would-be ideal for human resources management classes, as well. The teaching notes outline questions and teaching plans that are appropriate for undergraduate, graduate, and executive levels.

As a reference book for entire business programs
The range of material in the casebook makes it an ideal reference book for many courses in a bachelor's or M.B.A. program. Cases could be used in courses of management theory, principles of management, organizational behavior, human resources management, communication, negotiation, international management, power and politics, managing change, managing diversity, ethics and social responsibility, entrepreneurship and small business, and managing conflict.

Training programs
The prepared real-life cases and teaching notes meet learning objectives that improve organizational performance. Organizational development professionals and consultants will find a ready-made source of training materials available in the Casebook and Instructor's Manual of Case Teaching Notes. Since the cases are intermediate length, the training group can read the case during the session without prior preparation.

Support resources
Fully developed teaching notes including detailed answers, analysis, and an explicit teaching plan for long and short teaching sessions are included in the Instructor's Manual Case Teaching Notes, Volume 2. The instructor's manual is indexed by topic so that lesson plans can be quickly organized. Inexperienced case teachers will find it ideal to help them learn how to teach the case. Busy professors, or ones who like to offer spontaneous activities in the classroom, will find the planning in the teaching notes very useful. This high level of support for instructors is unusual for case teaching notes.

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Table of Contents

Case Analysis Guideline.

Critical Incident Case Assignment.

Matrix of Cases and Subjects.

CASES.

1. A Selfish Request in Japan, Tobias M. Lee. 2. Angry Branch Manager, Joe Underwood. 3. Café Latte, LLC, Kim Hui. 4. Changing Quotas, Susan Steele. 5. Computer Services Team at AVIONICS, Teri C. Tompkins. 6. Cost and Schedule Team at AVIONICS, Teri C. Tompkins. 7. Groupware Fiasco, Diane Fiero and Jonnetta Thomas-Chambers. 8. Incident on the USS Whitney, Jeff Balesh. 9. Insubordination or Unclear Loyalties?, Asbjorn Osland and Shannon Shoul. 10. Leading TQM in Panama, Asbjorn Osland. 11. Negotiating Work Hours, Loren Falkenberg and D. Ronald Franklin. 12. Preferential Treatment?, Brian Park. 13. Reputation in Jeopardy, Amber Borden. 14. Richard Prichard and the Federal Triad Programs, Earle Hall. 15. Saving Private Ryan Video Case: Classic Leadership Models, James C. Spee. 16. The Safety Memo, Gordon Baldwin. 17. The Volunteer, Louise A. Palermo. 18. Then There Was One, Susan Pippert. 19. Unprofessional Conduct, Andre Hamilton. 20. Violence at the United States Postal Service: The Killing of James Whooper by Bruce Clark, Dianne R. Layden. 21. When Worlds Collide, Russell Aebig.

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Preface

I've put this book together to fill a void that I think exists in the field of case teaching. There are not enough intermediate-length cases, especially in organizational behavior and management. Most cases available for the classroom are long, messy cases requiring total commitment to "the case method." There is rarely enough time to review and discuss theory or to include classroom exercises. The alternatives are the short cases at the end of the chapter in the textbook. These cases are usually fictional or gleaned from an article, such as found in the Wall Street Journal, not from direct contact with the organization and the people. They require very little thinking from students, with the "problem" and "right answer" clearly drawn from the chapter in question. These end-of-chapter cases provide little challenge for students.

The intermediate-length cases in this book are messy enough that students have to think to analyze them, yet short enough that the instructor can include other teaching methods such as lecture or classroom exercises. The cases are real—the facts of the case have not been altered to make it more illustrative or plausible. Consequently, many of the cases have strong emotional undertones, which draw the students into the case and help them relate to the key characters. Students care about what happens to the people and the organization. Classroom discussion is lively. Students gain mastery of the course content because they have used course-pertinent theories and concepts, along with their own reasoning and relevant experience, to approach genuine organizational problems.

Where Can You Use This Book?

Courses in management or organizational behavior
I've included a detailed matrix referencing each case to 18 different subject chapters. There are numerous cases that would-be ideal for human resources management classes, as well. The teaching notes outline questions and teaching plans that are appropriate for undergraduate, graduate, and executive levels.

As a reference book for entire business programs
The range of material in the casebook makes it an ideal reference book for many courses in a bachelor's or M.B.A. program. Cases could be used in courses of management theory, principles of management, organizational behavior, human resources management, communication, negotiation, international management, power and politics, managing change, managing diversity, ethics and social responsibility, entrepreneurship and small business, and managing conflict.

Training programs
The prepared real-life cases and teaching notes meet learning objectives that improve organizational performance. Organizational development professionals and consultants will find a ready-made source of training materials available in the Casebook and Instructor's Manual of Case Teaching Notes. Since the cases are intermediate length, the training group can read the case during the session without prior preparation.

Support resources
Fully developed teaching notes including detailed answers, analysis, and an explicit teaching plan for long and short teaching sessions are included in the Instructor's Manual Case Teaching Notes, Volume 2. The instructor's manual is indexed by topic so that lesson plans can be quickly organized. Inexperienced case teachers will find it ideal to help them learn how to teach the case. Busy professors, or ones who like to offer spontaneous activities in the classroom, will find the planning in the teaching notes very useful. This high level of support for instructors is unusual for case teaching notes.

Read More Show Less

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