Casey at the Bat

( 8 )

Overview

This is an edition that evokes those amazingly languid summers when you were ten or eleven, listening to baseball games on a distant radio in the heat of the day. LeRoy Neiman has created a Mudville team that's large, muscular, present, and very American—with the first Casey to actually breathe at the plate.

A gorgeous collectible volume first printed as a signed limited edition, LeRoy Neiman's Casey at the Bat is illustrated with nearly 100 pages of lush, meticulously detailed ...

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Casey at the Bat

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Overview

This is an edition that evokes those amazingly languid summers when you were ten or eleven, listening to baseball games on a distant radio in the heat of the day. LeRoy Neiman has created a Mudville team that's large, muscular, present, and very American—with the first Casey to actually breathe at the plate.

A gorgeous collectible volume first printed as a signed limited edition, LeRoy Neiman's Casey at the Bat is illustrated with nearly 100 pages of lush, meticulously detailed charcoal drawings that are a rare departure from the vibrantly colored paintings that made him famous. Yankees manage Joe Torre, who some say is the greatest baseball manager of all time, has written an original introduction especially for this edition. Ernest Thayer's quintessential story, beloved throughout the ages, comes to life like never before alongside Neiman's incomparable artistry in an affordable, accessible volume that's sure to be treasured by all generations.

About the Authors:
LeRoy Neiman is best known for his brilliantly colored, stunningly energetic images of sporting events and leisure activities. A member of the New York City Advisory Commission for Cultural Affairs since 1995, Neiman has received four honorary degrees and, among other honors, an Award of Merit from the American Athletic Union (1976), a Gold Plate Award from the American Academy of Achievement (1977), and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Muscular Dystrophy Association (1986). He lives in New York City.

Ernest Thayer (1862-1940) wrote newspaper humor pieces under the pseudonym "Phin." Casey at the Bat first appeared in 1888.

The popular narrative poem about a celebrated baseball player who strikes out at the crucial moment of a game, illustrated with a cast of animal characters.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Penned in 1888, Thayer's classic ballad is still as fresh as a rookie pitcher; it has earned its place in the Read-Aloud Hall of Fame. Though the style is slightly formal and young audiences may not catch every word "upon that stricken multitude grim melancholy sat", no one will miss the gist of the tale. With a few brief strokes of his brush, Fitzgerald captures an era-a hat of a certain style, a pair of glasses, the cut of a suit-and his light-dappled acrylics seem aged by a fine patina. He manipulates perspective to wonderful advantage, bringing a sense of movement to the pages: readers are now in the stands, now at third base, now behind the catcher as the mighty Casey prepares to swing at the ball. A home-run effort. Ages 6-10. Apr.
Children's Literature - Marilyn Courtot
The familiar poem is given a fresh look with Polacco's amusing artwork. It opens with a little girl reminding her brother that the big game will soon start and that he better get moving. Casey is filled with confidence and even though he arrives late and the ensuing game appears in jeopardy, he believes he can save the day. Polacco adds a real twist to the ending that will surely delight Little League and big league fans. 1997 (orig.
Children's Literature
It is interesting when you read about the history of this poem, which has been around for more than one hundred years and is familiar to many. The author did not even want to take credit for it because he felt it was such an inferior example of his writing. How amusing that this is probably the poem that is most frequently associated with his name, and that the rest of his work is relatively unknown. This version is really one for contemporary tastes—it almost looks like a graphic novel. The bold illustrations use just four colors and depict a series of inner city ball players—who indeed look larger than life and are as serious about the game as the fans are. Teachers and librarians who are looking for material that will attract older students, many of whom are already reading graphic novels, may find this one an easy sell. For any baseball fan, this book is definitely one with plenty of appeal. 2006, Kids Can Press, Ages 10 up.
—Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-Thayer's famous poem, presented here in picture-book format, is still fresh and still filled with excitement and suspense. Fitzgerald's colorful, double-spread acrylic illustrations pit the greens and yellows of the field against the bright blue sky. The scenes are softened and blurred by the brushwork, which, along with the players' loose-fitting striped uniforms, infuses the book with the atmosphere of an old-fashioned, hometown game. Casey swaggers through the verses, a Babe Ruth-like figure in command of the crowd until the last terrible moment when he swings and misses. In his illustrations for Jack Norworth's multilayered Take Me Out to the Ballgame Four Winds, 1992, Alex Gillman uses interesting facts from the history of the sport to add meaning to the poem. This new offering simply illustrates an old bit of popular culture, but it captures the thrill of the game, and baseball fans will enjoy it. It's pure entertainment.-Shirley Wilton, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up-Morse updates Thayer's baseball classic to a modern, urban setting with a multiracial cast filling the familiar roles. As tall buildings loom above them, metallic fences confine the players who seem pensive and watchful. The figures are strikingly rendered in oils and acrylics, their features sharply limned in thick black lines and smudges of neutral color. Their baggy jeans and sweatshirts only serve to emphasize the powerful grace of their large, muscular bodies. The artist captures the explosive action in panel drawings and suggests conflict through the placement of figures on the page. The fans watch the game with a fierce intensity, and the crowd seems volatile. This marks a sharp contrast to traditional versions, such as Christopher Bing's Caldecott honor winner (Handprint, 2000) and C. F. Payne's humorous rendition (S & S, 2003). This latest Casey commands the spotlight with his stunning physique and masterful demeanor, but Morse shows readers his vulnerability. In the end, the bereft batter kneels at the plate as the last member of the home crowd adjusts his headphones and ambles off. Featuring an artful design and small size, this version will find a wide audience among older readers. Morse proves once again the timeless appeal of Thayer's classic poem, and extends its relevance to a new generation of readers.-Marilyn Taniguchi, Beverly Hills Public Library, CA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Quill and Quire
[One of the most striking Canadian picture books of the year.
The National Post
Morse’s illustrations ? yank this classic and wonderfully told story out of the realm of nostalgia.
From the Publisher
[One of the most striking Canadian picture books of the year.

The artist captures the explosive action ? and extends (the poem’s) relevance to a new generation of readers.

Morse’s illustrations ? yank this classic and wonderfully told story out of the realm of nostalgia.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780698115576
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/28/1997
  • Series: All Aboard Books Series
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 65,447
  • Age range: 6 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.94 (w) x 10.48 (h) x 0.09 (d)

Meet the Author

Joe Morse is an award-winning illustrator and the director of Sheridan Institute's illustration degree program in Toronto, Ontario. His first picture book, Casey at the Bat, has received numerous honors.
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Table of Contents


Introduction
Text, Illustrations
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    Casey at the Bat

    This is one of my favorite poems and is definatly worth $1


    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2013

    It's a classic to be read by all.

    My son's name is Casey. He loves it until the part where he strikes out.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    This is so tots hilar..

    You know.. honests ive never tried talking like this but i think that i kinda tots like talkin like this... anyway this poetry was the best.. it taught a few younger kids about big words that sometimes i even had to look up in the dictionary just to find a little meaning to all of the poem. I personally got to take myeffort into putting my time into other peoples lives by reading the younger kids this amazing realistic poem. I even thought that i could make my own little thing or two baseball cards on the trip to the bus. You never know how much fun youll have when you realize that you can make a script and rehearse it in front of an audience or just a small family gathering... or you could think out of the box and do some thing totally unexpected! You can do anything you put your mind too! 5 star rating because it gave children knowledge and very good feedback afterwards, so if you ask me you will think i am a total doofus for making all this up.. but i didnt i read the book at least five million times... this was a great book and i recomend it to people that want knowledge. But not all that boring..( makayla salisbury)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2012

    Good

    Good

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  • Posted January 17, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    You might want to read this...

    This book isn't to my liking but it has a really great overall story and an excellent lesson. It teaches you to build self-confidence and to believe in yourself. I really like how it teaches you that and you can just see it. Not only does it teach self-confidence, but it has a lesson in poetry. I recommend it for teachers, students, and class rooms.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2007

    A rea l confidence builder

    By: Patricia Polacco The book I read was Casey at the Bat. It is a good picture book if you like baseball. It¿s about a boy named Casey that is lazy because he has so much confidence in himself. In the book, his sister tells him to get up or he would be late for his baseball game. He gets there and his team is losing. It¿s Casey¿s turn to bat and with two strikes he swings and misses and they lose again. But it doesn¿t end here it gets more exciting. When he is up again, he swings on his third strike and the picture zooms out to make it look like he hit a home run. If you have confidence and you believe you can achieve, read this book and find out if it is exciting to you! Reviewed by: Calen

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

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