The Castle Of Wolfenbach (Dodo Press)

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Overview

Eliza Parsons, nee Phelp, (1739-1811) was an English gothic novelist. She was born in Plymouth to a comfortable middle class family and moved to London when her husband's turpentine business was affected by the American War of Independence. The family's fortunes were further debilitated by a warehouse fire and when he died in 1790, Eliza was left alone with eight children. She turned to novel writing to support her large family and produced 19 two volume novels, many of which were in the romantic or gothic vein ...
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The Castle of Wolfenbach

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More About This Book

Overview

Eliza Parsons, nee Phelp, (1739-1811) was an English gothic novelist. She was born in Plymouth to a comfortable middle class family and moved to London when her husband's turpentine business was affected by the American War of Independence. The family's fortunes were further debilitated by a warehouse fire and when he died in 1790, Eliza was left alone with eight children. She turned to novel writing to support her large family and produced 19 two volume novels, many of which were in the romantic or gothic vein so popular at the time. Her work is generally agreed to be of varying quality, produced as it was out of financial necessity to meet popular tastes but her two most enduring works are The Castle of Wolfenbach in 1793 and The Mysterious Warning: A German Tale in 1796. Her other works include: The History of Miss Meredith (1790), Women as They Are (1797), Anecdotes of Well-Known Families (1798) and The Valley of St. Gothard (1799).
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781409979241
  • Publisher: Dodo Press
  • Publication date: 2/26/2010
  • Pages: 230
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.52 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 22, 2010

    Jane Austen said you should read it

    In Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen gave a list of "horrible" books, Gothic romances well worth reading. One of these was The Castle of Wolfenbach. This book has everything - mysterious, spooky castles, evil villains, and a damsel in distress after distress.

    While Gothic fiction may often seem overdone and overwrought to modern readers, there is something wonderful in the beautifully over-the-top dangers the heroine faces, one after the other.

    However, Wolfenbach, unlike a great deal of Gothic fiction (where ghostly paintings regularly come to life and statues of gigantic saints throw their wagon sized helmets onto evil-doers to crush them), Wolfenbach is willing to give rational explanations for at least some of the spooky happenings. Human enemies are much more to be feared than supernatural ones and dashing heroes should not expect ghosts and statues to come to their aid.

    For modern readers, the melodrama may be more amusing than thrilling, but two centuries hasn't dimmed the sparkle of this book. It can be enjoyed on its own, but Jane Austen fans may be glad to know where some of the origin of some of the wackier ideas of the heroine in Northanger Abbey.

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  • Posted February 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Great gothic romance

    The author does a great job of intertwining the lives of Matilda Weimar and Countess Wolfenbach. Though the ladies are separated by a difference of many years, they are greatly oppressed by similar tyrants and find great comfort in each other. You must read the story to find out what becomes of them. It is an excellent story. If I had to find anything to complain about it would only be that I wish the story had been longer.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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