"Catch 'em Alive Jack": The Life and Adventures of an American Pioneer

by John R. Abernathy
     
 

Best known for catching wolves alive with his bare hands, John R. Abernathy (1876–1941) was born to Scottish ancestors in Texas. Raised in the burgeoning railroad town of Sweetwater, Abernathy considered himself a true son of the Wild West. In his amazing life he worked as a U.S. marshal, sheriff, Secret Service agent, and wildcat oil driller. But it was the

Overview


Best known for catching wolves alive with his bare hands, John R. Abernathy (1876–1941) was born to Scottish ancestors in Texas. Raised in the burgeoning railroad town of Sweetwater, Abernathy considered himself a true son of the Wild West. In his amazing life he worked as a U.S. marshal, sheriff, Secret Service agent, and wildcat oil driller. But it was the accidental discovery of a bold means of catching wolves alive that made Abernathy famous and drew the attention of President Theodore Roosevelt. By forcing his hand deep enough into a wolf's mouth, he could stun the creature long enough to capture it, a service for which he was paid fifty dollars by eager ranchers.
 
This Bison Books edition brings Abernathy's vivid account of his life into print for the first time since its original publication in 1936.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The Wild West sprouted a wide array of characters who could be a lawman one day and a prospector the next. Abernathy fit that profile: he served as a U.S. marshal and sheriff, a secret service agent, and an oil driller. He came to notoriety, however, for accidentally discovering a distinctive way to capture wolves alive by shoving his hand down their throats (I'm not kidding), which somehow stunned the animals. This trick caught the attention of Teddy Roosevelt, and the two became friends. Abernathy recorded his adventures for posterity in 1936. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803259560
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Publication date:
07/01/2006
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
215
Sales rank:
274,356
Product dimensions:
0.50(w) x 8.00(h) x 5.25(d)

Read an Excerpt



"Catch 'em Alive Jack"


The Life and Adventures of an American Pioneer


By John R. Abernathy


University of Nebraska Press


Copyright © 2006

University of Nebraska Press

All right reserved.

ISBN: 0-8032-5956-5



Foreword


Jon T. Coleman

In 1891, at the age of fifteen, Jack Abernathy jammed his
hand in the mouth of a large West Texas "loafer" wolf.
Instead of losing his fingers, he found his life's work. His fist
landed at the very back of the animal's jaw. The wolf tried
to bite him, but with his jowls blocked open by the hand,
he could exert only a stifled chomp. Unhurt but unable
to let go, Abernathy endured the stalemate until a cowboy
colleague found him. They extricated the hand, wired the
wolf's muzzle shut, and carried the animal home. Thus was
born "Catch 'em Alive Jack," the alter ego that would carry
Abernathy from Texas to the White House.

Born in Bosque County, Texas, in 1876, Abernathy
plowed through a series of western personas during his
lifetime. He hired on as a cowboy for the A-K-X Ranch at the
age of nine, and by fifteen he was an accomplished "bronc
buster," riding the first saddle on "308 wild horses" for the ja
outfit (p. 42). A pianist and fiddler, he entertained the saloon
rowdies in Sweetwater, Texas. A hunter, he killed bears
and chased wolves with greyhounds. He rushed for land
in Oklahoma and fought whiskey runners in Arkansas. He
wore the badges ofunder-sheriff, posse member, deputy
marshal, U.S. marshal, and Secret Service agent. He was a
homesteader, a rancher, and a wildcat oil driller. He rode a
loyal steed called Sam Bass and owned a heroic dog named
Catch. Wearing a six shooter, associating with characters
like "Blue" Johnson, "Post Oak" Jim, and "Grasshopper"
Roberts, and uttering phrases like "I am a goner for keeps"
and "Hands up, Keller!," Jack Abernathy could lay claim
to an exquisite dime novel identity: he was a singing, gun-toting
cowboy/lawman who busted broncs, settled wildernesses,
and drilled gushers. Yet, while manly and romantic
western jobs filled his resume, he chose grasping the lower
jaws of predatory canines as his first talent and principal
contribution to human history. It was a peculiar choice,
and unearthing the reasons for Abernathy's odd presentation
of himself is one of the joys of reading his wild,
entertaining, and factually challenged autobiography.

Abernathy captured over a thousand wolves in his lifetime.
He sold the animals to "parks, zoos, traveling shows,
and firms which used them for breeding stock" (p. 60). He
also used the animals in his own shows, catching coyotes,
"loafers," and large wolves in one place and transporting
them to parks and prairies where he would stick his hand
in their mouths again in front of an audience. On Christmas
Day 1904, Abernathy "entertained" crowds at Lyon's
Park in Texas. The owner of the park, Cecil Lyon, was a
prominent Republican, and he told President Theodore
Roosevelt about Abernathy. The next spring, Roosevelt, a
collection of ranchers, Rough Riders, bankers, and an assortment
of cooks, waiters, and manservants gathered at
Big Pasture, Oklahoma, for a hunt with the "bare-handed
wolfer."

Abernathy caught the president's imagination along
with several wolves. After watching him jump from Sam
Bass and secure a coyote "in the usual way," Roosevelt declared,
"This beats anything I have ever seen in my life,
and I have seen a good deal!" (p. 115). Abernathy's skill
as a hunter, his knowledge of animals, his physical vigor,
and his plain manners matched Roosevelt's vision of manliness.
The wolfer embodied the president's West, a rough
place that tested men. After the 1905 hunt, Abernathy performed
for Roosevelt for the next fourteen years, traveling
to Washington dc and New York to dine, box, and regale
the president with colorful western stories.

(Continues...)





Excerpted from "Catch 'em Alive Jack"
by John R. Abernathy
Copyright © 2006 by University of Nebraska Press.
Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author


Kermit Roosevelt (1889–1943) hunted big game with his father, President Theodore Roosevelt, and served in World War I and World War II. Jon T. Coleman is an assistant professor of history at Notre Dame and the author of Vicious: Wolves and Men in America.

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