Catherine's Story

Catherine's Story

5.0 1
by Karin Littlewood, Genevieve Moore
     
 

What makes Catherine so special? She can't talk, she can't walk like her cousin Frances can. But Catherine listens very hard (hardly anyone does that), and she can walk in her special shoes, but when Frances tries, she just falls over! And her claps are so quiet that hardly anyone can hear them. These are the things that make Catherine special and, because her

Overview

What makes Catherine so special? She can't talk, she can't walk like her cousin Frances can. But Catherine listens very hard (hardly anyone does that), and she can walk in her special shoes, but when Frances tries, she just falls over! And her claps are so quiet that hardly anyone can hear them. These are the things that make Catherine special and, because her family knows how special she is, this makes them feel special too. This is the story of a child born with severe additional needs that focusses on the special nature of her abilities. Written from first-hand experience of the author's niece, this is a thoroughly researched and heart-warming book that will enlighten all who read it. Foreword by Jacqueline Wilson.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Michele C. Hughes
Vivid, beautiful watercolor illustrations capture the story of Catherine, a fictional character based on a little girl who suffered from a kind of infant epilepsy that left her unable to speak, care for herself or understand much of what is said to her. Her father is her primary caregiver, and he tells her story by explaining Catherine's specialness to her cousin, Frances. He tells Frances about how only Catherine can walk as well in her special boots, listen as hard as she does or clap her hands so softly they don't make a sound. The author demonstrates the father's appreciation of Catherine's specialness and her family's abiding love for her. At the end of the story, her father reminds Catherine of how special and loved she is, and she responds from her heart. This story shows children the uniqueness and value of each person and the depths of a parent's love. Bright colors in the illustrations convey in the joy that Catherine brings to her family, despite her limitations in life. An author's note in the back of the book explains a bit about Catherine's condition for further understanding. Reviewer: Michele C. Hughes
School Library Journal
Gr 1–3—Catherine, who wears leg braces, has a special walk and a special way of clapping her hands (so quietly, no one ever hears them). Her cousin Frances thinks she can walk like Catherine but when she tries, she falls over. When she says that Catherine can't talk, Catherine's dad says, "lots and lots of people talk....too much....Catherine listens—really, really hard." Catherine is loved and valued. Her father seems to be a single parent with some involvement from a grandmother.The lovely watercolor illustrations capture joy and optimism. With subtlety and grace, they perfectly depict a child with disabilities. It is challenging to present such issues without seeming maudlin, and Moore has done this fairly well. However, in an effort to present some differences as positive abilities, there is sometimes an unrealistic overstatement of the importance of these traits. That said, this picture book is useful because of its value in generating needed discussion. An even better depiction of disabilities is Jane Cowen-Fletcher's Mama Zooms (Scholastic, 1996).—Mary Hazelton, Elementary Schools in Warren & Waldoboro, ME
Kirkus Reviews

An affectionate appreciation of a unique child. "Catherine is a special girl and she can do special things," the story begins. Moore leads the reader through Catherine's distinct attributes and her interactions with her family, using a curious cousin's visit to introduce Catherine to readers. She has a special walk and boots to help her (which her cousin can't help trying on and then discovers it's not so easy walking in them). Catherine can't talk, but it's clear from her reactions that she listens very hard. She claps in a special way, in tiny, quiet claps. And her parents and grandmother are there to support her at every turn. Littlewood's watercolor illustrations depict many warm family tableaux as well as the expressive Catherine alone, showing what makes her special. It's a sympathetic, straightforward and informative look at the world of one disabled child that's both clear and accessible to the very young. A concluding note explains that Catherine's disability is a type of epilepsy. (Picture book. 3-5)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781845076559
Publisher:
Frances Lincoln Children's Books
Publication date:
07/29/2010
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 10.70(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Karin Littlewood's acclaimed picture books include The Color of Home, Home for Christmas, Home Now, Catherine's Story, and When Dad Was Away. Also the author of Immi and Sea Horse, she lives in London.

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Catherine's Story 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Tiges More than 1 year ago
This book is beautiful in every respect from its touching and heart felt words to its dreamy yet no holds barred illustrations. It is important on so many levels and should be in every school and in every home library. Highly recommended.