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Catholic and Feminist: The Surprising History of the American Catholic Feminist Movement

Overview

In 1963, as Betty Friedan's Feminine Mystique appeared and civil rights activists marched on Washington, a separate but related social movement emerged among American Catholics, says Mary Henold. Thousands of Catholic feminists--both lay women and women religious--marched, strategized, theologized, and prayed together, building sisterhood and confronting sexism in the Roman Catholic Church. In the first history of American Catholic feminism, Henold explores the movement from the 1960s through the early 1980s, ...
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Overview

In 1963, as Betty Friedan's Feminine Mystique appeared and civil rights activists marched on Washington, a separate but related social movement emerged among American Catholics, says Mary Henold. Thousands of Catholic feminists--both lay women and women religious--marched, strategized, theologized, and prayed together, building sisterhood and confronting sexism in the Roman Catholic Church. In the first history of American Catholic feminism, Henold explores the movement from the 1960s through the early 1980s, showing that although Catholic feminists had much in common with their sisters in the larger American feminist movement, Catholic feminism was distinct and had not been simply imported from outside.

Catholic feminism grew from within the church, rooted in women's own experiences of Catholicism and religious practice, Henold argues. She identifies the Second Vatican Council (1962-65), an inspiring but overtly sexist event that enraged and exhilarated Catholic women in equal measure, as a catalyst of the movement within the church. Catholic feminists regularly explained their feminism in terms of their commitment to a gospel mandate for social justice, liberation, and radical equality. They considered feminism to be a Christian principle.

Yet as Catholic feminists confronted sexism in the church and the world, Henold explains, they struggled to integrate the two parts of their self-definition. Both Catholic culture and feminist culture indicated that such a conjunction was unlikely, if not impossible. Henold demonstrates that efforts to reconcile faith and feminism reveal both the complex nature of feminist consciousness and the creative potential of religious feminism.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
A splendid history of the American Catholic feminist movement. . . . Highly recommended for all seminary, academic, and public libraries.--Library Journal
Library Journal

Henold (history, Roanoke Coll.) has written a splendid history of the American Catholic feminist movement. According to her extensive and well-documented research, this movement was not primarily an importation of a secular feminist movement into American Catholicism-it grew from sexist conditions within the Roman Catholic Church. Its chief catalyst was the Second Vatican Council (1962-65)-Vatican II-which indeed modernized the church but quite visibly excluded women not simply from ordained ministry but also largely from being consulted about matters of canon law, theology, and praxis. From a feminist point of view, the result was a council that failed to follow its own social justice and equality mandates, mandates traceable back to the Gospels themselves. Henold concludes by emphasizing the way the Catholic feminist movement has empowered women to serve in such influential positions as pastoral administrators and theologians and has had a lasting impact on the Roman Catholic Church. Highly recommended for all seminary, academic, and public libraries.
—Carolyn M. Craft

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780807873533
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
  • Publication date: 9/28/2012
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Mary J. Henold is associate professor of history at Roanoke College.
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Table of Contents

Introduction 1

1 Origins 13

2 Demythologizing Ourselves 35

3 No Cakes in Hands unless Ideas in Heads 63

4 The Spirit Moving 83

5 The Love of Christ Leaves Us No Choice 117

6 Making Feminism Holy 137

7 A Matter of Conversion 167

8 Sustained Ambivalence 197

Epilogue: 1980-1986 233

Notes 245

Bibliography 273

Index 287

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