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Catholic Schools And The Common Good / Edition 1

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Overview


The authors examine a broad range of Catholic high schools to determine whether or not students are better educated in these schools than they are in public schools. They find that the Catholic schools do have an independent effect on achievement, especially in reducing disparities between disadvantaged and privileged students. The Catholic school of today, they show, is informed by a vision, similar to that of John Dewey, of the school as a community committed to democratic education and the common good of all students.
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Editorial Reviews

Contemporary Sociology

A superb study that enhances our understanding not only of Catholic schools but of schools generally.
— James E. Rosenbaum

America

A richly detailed, and documented study...Besides being the best group portrait of today's U.S. Catholic high schools, this is also a formidable testimonial to the virtues and accomplishments of those schools.
— John W. Donohue

New York Times Book Review

Like the schools they write about, the authors of this important book combine scholarship with a mission. The scholarship in this book is a rare blend of case study, number crunching and rumination in social and intellectual history.
— Joseph P. McDonald

Commonweal

The central argument of this clearly written, superbly researched effort is that [American] public high schools need to mimic their Catholic counterparts. Catholic high schools, according to the authors, 'manage simultaneously to achieve relatively high levels of student learning, distribute this learning more equitably with regard to race and class than in the public sector, and sustain high levels of teachers commitment and student engagement.'
— John T. McGreevy

Dayton News

This comprehensive analysis of the effects of Catholic schools, especially on low-income children, concluded that 'Catholic schools function as a public resource.' Catholic schools are able to accomplish this essential task in all communities because, among many important factors, they introduce a spiritual dimension to the student's education.
— Mike McCormick

Teachers College Record

[An] exemplary book...Catholic Schools and the Common Good provides intensive analysis of the distinctive character of Catholic schools...After reading the book, one is not only convinced that Catholic schools have advantages for academic achievement—especially for low-income and minority youth—but one understands the mechanisms through which these advantages accrue.
— Adam Gamoran

Contemporary Sociology - James E. Rosenbaum
A superb study that enhances our understanding not only of Catholic schools but of schools generally.
America - John W. Donohue
A richly detailed, and documented study...Besides being the best group portrait of today's U.S. Catholic high schools, this is also a formidable testimonial to the virtues and accomplishments of those schools.
New York Times Book Review - Joseph P. McDonald
Like the schools they write about, the authors of this important book combine scholarship with a mission. The scholarship in this book is a rare blend of case study, number crunching and rumination in social and intellectual history.
Commonweal - John T. McGreevy
The central argument of this clearly written, superbly researched effort is that [American] public high schools need to mimic their Catholic counterparts. Catholic high schools, according to the authors, 'manage simultaneously to achieve relatively high levels of student learning, distribute this learning more equitably with regard to race and class than in the public sector, and sustain high levels of teachers commitment and student engagement.'
Dayton News - Mike McCormick
This comprehensive analysis of the effects of Catholic schools, especially on low-income children, concluded that 'Catholic schools function as a public resource.' Catholic schools are able to accomplish this essential task in all communities because, among many important factors, they introduce a spiritual dimension to the student's education.
Teachers College Record - Adam Gamoran
[An] exemplary book...Catholic Schools and the Common Good provides intensive analysis of the distinctive character of Catholic schools...After reading the book, one is not only convinced that Catholic schools have advantages for academic achievement--especially for low-income and minority youth--but one understands the mechanisms through which these advantages accrue.
Commonweal
The central argument of this clearly written, superbly researched effort is that [American] public high schools need to mimic their Catholic counterparts. Catholic high schools, according to the authors, 'manage simultaneously to achieve relatively high levels of student learning, distribute this learning more equitably with regard to race and class than in the public sector, and sustain high levels of teachers commitment and student engagement.'
— John T. McGreevy
America
A richly detailed, and documented study...Besides being the best group portrait of today's U.S. Catholic high schools, this is also a formidable testimonial to the virtues and accomplishments of those schools.
— John W. Donohue
New York Times Book Review
Like the schools they write about, the authors of this important book combine scholarship with a mission. The scholarship in this book is a rare blend of case study, number crunching and rumination in social and intellectual history.
— Joseph P. McDonald
Dayton News
This comprehensive analysis of the effects of Catholic schools, especially on low-income children, concluded that 'Catholic schools function as a public resource.' Catholic schools are able to accomplish this essential task in all communities because, among many important factors, they introduce a spiritual dimension to the student's education.
— Mike McCormick
Contemporary Sociology
A superb study that enhances our understanding not only of Catholic schools but of schools generally.
— James E. Rosenbaum
Teachers College Record
[An] exemplary book...Catholic Schools and the Common Good provides intensive analysis of the distinctive character of Catholic schools...After reading the book, one is not only convinced that Catholic schools have advantages for academic achievement--especially for low-income and minority youth--but one understands the mechanisms through which these advantages accrue.
— Adam Gamoran
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674103115
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 1/1/1993
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 418
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.85 (d)

Meet the Author

Anthony S. Bryk is Professor of Education at the University of Chicago.

Valerie E. Lee is Associate Professor of Education at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

Peter B. Holland is Superintendent of the Belmont school system, Belmont, Massachusetts.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Prologue

CONTEXT

The Tradition of Catholic Schools

Research Past and Present

INSTITUTIONAL ANALYSIS

Classroom Life

Curriculum and Academic Organization

Communal Organization

Governance

DIVERSITY AMONG CATHOLIC SCHOOLS

The Transition to High School

Variations in Internal Operations

Single-Sex versus Coeducational Schools

EFFECTS

The Impact of Academic Organization

The Impact of Communal Organization

IMPLICATIONS

Catholic Lessons for America's Schools

Epilogue: The Future of Catholic High Schools

Notes

References

Index

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